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I am working on an Android app that will record (with GPS) the tracks that a user rides on their dirt bike. After finishing a ride I would like to be able to analyse this data and find the tracks that were ridden.

I will define a track as the travelled area between two intersections. An intersection being two or more points that are close enough to each other to be classified as one point. Obviously I need to decide on some sort of threshold for this.

Obviously I can do this with brute force checking every point against every other point but I think there must be a more efficient approach.

Any ideas on a better way?

Thanks Guys.

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2 Answers 2

Kalman filter is frequently used to reject error (noise) points and to simplify GPS tracks and estimate real trajectories. Wiki page looks rather complex, so it would be nice to find some practical articles about track filtering.

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To be practical:

  1. the GPS points must be in the order of your ridding, so you only need to check some continuous points to be a intersection.
  2. for every point, make it the center of a circle, see how many points stands in the circle, then you can combine these points into one intersection.
  3. the generated intersections will also be in the order of your ridding.
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How would this work in the situation where you come across the same intersection from a different track later in the ride? –  mattjones701 May 8 '12 at 11:31
    
@user1381573 if the points are (a1, a2, b1, b2, c1, c2, a1, a2), the generated intersections will be (a, b, c, a). think (a1, a2), (b1, b2) and (c1, c2) are both very close to each other. –  pengdu May 9 '12 at 6:18

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