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If I have this method:

-(void) methodName
{
    action1;
    action2;
    [self methodName];
}

I want the [self methodName] call to be done only once, therefore the method to be called only twice consecutively. Can this be done? Not sure where in the docs I should be looking.

Whenever method 'methodName' is called, then when action1 and action2 are done, it should call itself again, but only once. The way it is done in the sample code I have written is going on forever (I am guessing).

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No, not during the whole program execution. If the method 'methodName' is called, then when action1 and action2 are done, it should call itself again, but only once.. The way it is done in the sample code I have written is going on forever (I am guessing). –  Kevin May 8 '12 at 9:30
    
Thanks Mat, just edited the question. –  Kevin May 8 '12 at 9:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

If you mean to say only once during the entire lifetime of the application, you can use dispatch_once, like this:

-(void)methodName
{
    action1;
    action2;

    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
       [self methodName];
    });
}

If, however, you meant for the method to execute action1 and action2 twice per invocation, you have two options:

1) Wrap that functionality in another method:

- (void)executeMethod {
    [self methodName];
    [self methodName];
}

2) Even simpler, wrap it in a loop:

- (void)methodName {
   for(int i = 0; i < 2; ++i) {
      action1();
      action2();
   }

   //...
}
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That makes a lot of sense, however I would rather keep the methods down to a minimum, however I will keep this answer is mind. Thanks. –  Kevin May 8 '12 at 9:35
    
@Kevin See my updated answer. –  Jacob Relkin May 8 '12 at 9:36

You can use static variable:

-(void) methodName
{
    static BOOL called = NO;
    if (called == NO)
    {
        called = YES;
        [self methodName];
    }
    else
    {
        called = NO;
    }
}
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Wouldn't this always set the BOOL value to NO? Thanks. –  Kevin May 8 '12 at 9:42
    
No, initialization of static variable happens only once in the program lifetime. –  MByD May 8 '12 at 9:47
    
Yes and No. This code makes the method being called twice. After it's called once the "called" boolean is set to YES preventing a third call. When it's called the second time, the "called" bool is set back to "NO" to prepare it for another call (which will run it twice again)! Nice snippet Binyamin –  Tieme Oct 22 '12 at 14:02
    
@Tieme - I hear you, yet the question specifies that the method should be called only twice, not once. –  MByD Oct 22 '12 at 14:08
    
Yeah of course! By calling the method it now calls itself a second time 'automaticly' :) –  Tieme Oct 22 '12 at 14:19

The simplest thing to do is split that in two methods:

-(void) subMethodName
{
    action1;
    action2;
}

-(void) methodName
{
    [self subMethodName];
    [self subMethodName];
}

Or to use a loop of some form or other.

(What you have in your original code is infinite recursion - not a good thing in general.)

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You need to apply some logic on it. This can be using Bool Variable Or simply a count.

Take

int Count=0; //as a global variable.

Now just modify your method as follows

-(void) methodName
{
    Count++;
    action1;
    action2;
    if(Count==1)
       [self methodName];
}
share|improve this answer
    
How would I reset the counter so that the same logic can be applied the next time that the method is run? –  Kevin May 8 '12 at 9:41
    
The way it is at the moment, I think it would still be an infinite loop kind of situation.. –  Kevin May 8 '12 at 9:44
    
to apply same logic reset count to 0 –  Priya Chhabra May 8 '12 at 10:24

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