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What is the (default) charset for:

  • MySQL database

  • MySQL table

  • MySQL column

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11 Answers 11

Here's how I'd do it -

For Schemas:

SELECT default_character_set_name FROM information_schema.SCHEMATA 
WHERE schema_name = "schemaname";

For Tables:

SELECT CCSA.character_set_name FROM information_schema.`TABLES` T,
       information_schema.`COLLATION_CHARACTER_SET_APPLICABILITY` CCSA
WHERE CCSA.collation_name = T.table_collation
  AND T.table_schema = "schemaname"
  AND T.table_name = "tablename";

For Columns:

SELECT character_set_name FROM information_schema.`COLUMNS` 
WHERE table_schema = "schemaname"
  AND table_name = "tablename"
  AND column_name = "columnname";
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2  
Should be noted that information_schema is only in MySQL 5 onwards I believe. –  Vex Jun 26 '09 at 16:54
3  
As far as I can tell the closest you can get to retrieving column specific character set information in MySQL < 5 is to do SHOW FULL COLUMNS FROM tableName –  Robin Winslow Jun 7 '11 at 18:03
4  
OP: Please mark this as the accepted answer! –  robguinness Sep 13 '12 at 15:42
    
This answer was very helpful, but if you want to trouble shoot a character_set / collation issue you would probably also need to check connection character_set, client_character_set etc... : SHOW VARIABLES LIKE 'character_set%'; SHOW VARIABLES LIKE 'collation%'; –  BenL Feb 6 at 9:54

For columns:

SHOW FULL COLUMNS FROM table_name;
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Great and easy method. thanks –  TheNoble-Coder Jan 28 '13 at 17:48
1  
The best method of all above, needs more upvotes. (particularly for per column information) –  dmitry May 1 '13 at 15:13
14  
Hello, this is the future speaking! For anyone checking this answer, this method only shows Collation, rather than charset. I believe this changed at MySQL 5. (See answer with more points for a better method). –  fideloper Jan 28 '14 at 17:40
    
@fideloper, With the collation you can tell the charset. That is because the first part of collation includes the charset, e.g. if the collation is latin1_swedish_ci, the charset can't be anything else besides latin1. If the collation is utf8mb4_general_ci, the charset can't be anything else besides utf8mb4. –  Pacerier Aug 20 at 3:31

For databases:

USE your_database_name;
show variables like "character_set_database";
-- or:
-- show variables like "collation_database";

Cf. this page. And check out the MySQL manual

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3  
This only answers 1/3 of the question. –  Toby J Aug 3 '13 at 19:02
    
Really good and simple method! –  tonix Nov 28 '14 at 11:26
    
Also see the @@ solution at stackoverflow.com/a/30369693/632951 –  Pacerier Aug 20 at 4:14
    
@TobyJ, I don't see you complaining at stackoverflow.com/a/4805510/632951 –  Pacerier Aug 20 at 4:14
    
what does cf stands for? link does not exist though. @Pacerier –  Yannis Dran 2 days ago

For tables:

SHOW TABLE STATUS will list all the tables.

Filter using:

SHOW TABLE STATUS where name like 'table_123';
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2  
Please note. The collation shown in the show table status is not the character set of the table. The collation tells you how the characters are sorted / compared. e.g. utf8_bin_ci compares data without regarding the case (case insensitive, so "m" and "M" are the same), utf8_bin_cs compares with case sensitivity (so "m" and "M" are distinct). This is not the same as the character set of a table. –  Daan Oct 8 '14 at 7:43
    
@Daan, Stop spreading misinformation. See stackoverflow.com/questions/1049728/… , with the collation you can tell the charset. –  Pacerier Aug 20 at 3:56
SELECT TABLE_SCHEMA,
       TABLE_NAME,
       CCSA.CHARACTER_SET_NAME AS DEFAULT_CHAR_SET,
       COLUMN_NAME,
       COLUMN_TYPE,
       C.CHARACTER_SET_NAME
  FROM information_schema.TABLES AS T
  JOIN information_schema.COLUMNS AS C USING (TABLE_SCHEMA, TABLE_NAME)
  JOIN information_schema.COLLATION_CHARACTER_SET_APPLICABILITY AS CCSA
       ON (T.TABLE_COLLATION = CCSA.COLLATION_NAME)
 WHERE TABLE_SCHEMA=SCHEMA()
   AND C.DATA_TYPE IN ('enum', 'varchar', 'char', 'text', 'mediumtext', 'longtext')
 ORDER BY TABLE_SCHEMA,
          TABLE_NAME,
          COLUMN_NAME
;
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A breakdown would be good.............. –  Pacerier Aug 20 at 4:02

For tables and columns:

show create table your_table_name
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1  
It tells you the full SQL that would be used to create the table as it currently stands, which should include it's character set. –  James Jul 14 '12 at 18:09
    
Also, if the column doesn't state a particular charset, then it is using the table's default charset. –  Pacerier Aug 20 at 4:03

I always just look at SHOW CREATE TABLE mydatabase.mytable.

For the database, it appears you need to look at SELECT DEFAULT_CHARACTER_SET_NAME FROM information_schema.SCHEMATA.

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2  
in mysql databases can have default character sets –  James Jun 26 '09 at 15:28
    
select default_character_set_name from information_schema.schemata is not enough because you can't tell which row correlate with which database. Use select default_character_set_name,schema_name from information_schema.schemata or simply: select*from information_schema.schemata. –  Pacerier Aug 20 at 4:10

For databases:

SHOW CREATE DATABASE "DB_NAME_HERE";

In creating a Database (MySQL), default character set/collation is always LATIN, instead that you have selected a different one on initially creating your database

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Citation needed for "default character set/collation is always LATIN" in MySQL. –  Pacerier Aug 20 at 4:20

For databases:

USE db_name;
SELECT @@character_set_database;
-- or:
-- SELET @@collation_database;
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For databases:

SELECT SCHEMA_NAME 'database', default_character_set_name 'charset', DEFAULT_COLLATION_NAME 'collation' FROM information_schema.SCHEMATA;

Example output:

mysql> SELECT SCHEMA_NAME 'database', default_character_set_name 'charset', DEFAULT_COLLATION_NAME 'collation' FROM information_schema.SCHEMATA;
+----------------------------+---------+--------------------+
| database                   | charset | collation          |
+----------------------------+---------+--------------------+
| information_schema         | utf8    | utf8_general_ci    |
| drupal_demo1               | utf8    | utf8_general_ci    |
| drupal_demo2               | utf8    | utf8_general_ci    |
| drupal_demo3               | utf8    | utf8_general_ci    |
| drupal_demo4               | utf8    | utf8_general_ci    |
| drupal_demo5               | latin1  | latin1_swedish_ci  |

...

+----------------------------+---------+--------------------+
55 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> 
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Isn't this a repeat of the first answer on top and stackoverflow.com/a/1049753/632951 ? –  Pacerier Aug 20 at 4:18

The following worked for me:

ALTER TABLE <table_name> CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_general_ci;
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10  
The question is how to view the currently set default character set, not how to change it. –  lagweezle Jan 23 at 18:46

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