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Here is just an example of the data I need to format.

The first column is simple, the problem the second column.

  1. What would be the best approach to format multiple data fields in one column?
  2. How to parse this data?

Important*: The second column needs to contain multiple values, like in an example below

Name       Details

Alex       Age:25
           Height:6
           Hair:Brown
           Eyes:Hazel
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This format is not CSV - do you want to format it as CSV? Or are you just interested in ways of reading it? –  dash May 8 '12 at 11:25
    
Yes, I would like to format it in CSV and then read it –  user1294187 May 8 '12 at 11:29
    
Will there always be the same number of Column:Value variables? And, crucially, will they always be in the same order? –  dash May 8 '12 at 11:39

3 Answers 3

A CSV file is normally defined using commas as field separators and CR for a row separator. You are using CR within your second column, this will cause problems. You'll need to reformat your second column to use some other form of separator between multiple values. A common alternate separator is the | (pipe) character.

Your format would then look like: Alex,Age:25|Height:6|Hair:Brown|Eyes:Hazel

In your parsing, you would first parse the comma separated fields (which would return two values), and then parse the second field as pipe separated.

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A csv should probably look like this:

Name,Age,Height,Hair,Eyes
Alex,25,6,Brown,Hazel

Each cell should be separated by exactly one comma from its neighbor.

You can reformat it as such by using a simple regex which replaces certain newline and non-newline whitespace with commas (you can easily find each block because it has values in both columns).

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This is an interesting one - it can be quite difficult to parse specific format files which is why people often write specific classes to deal with them. More conventional file formats like CSV, or other delimited formats are [more] easy to read because they are formatted in a similar way.

A problem like the above can be addressed in the following way:

1) What should the output look like?

In your instance, and this is just a guess, but I believe you are aiming for the following:

Name, Age, Height, Hair, Eyes
Alex, 25, 6, Brown, Hazel

In which case, you have to parse out this information based on the structure above. If it's repeated blocks of text like the above then we can say the following:

a. Every person is in a block starting with Name Details

b. The name value is the first text after Details, with the other columns being delimited in the format Column:Value

However, you might also have sections with addtional attributes, or attributes that are missing if the original input was optional, so tracking the column and ordinal would be useful too.

So one approach might look like the following:

public void ParseFile(){

        String currentLine;

        bool newSection = false;

        //Store the column names and ordinal position here.
        List<String> nameOrdinals = new List<String>();
        nameOrdinals.Add("Name"); //IndexOf == 0

        Dictionary<Int32, List<String>> nameValues = new Dictionary<Int32 ,List<string>>(); //Use this to store each person's details

        Int32 rowNumber = 0;

        using (TextReader reader = File.OpenText("D:\\temp\\test.txt"))
        {

            while ((currentLine = reader.ReadLine()) != null) //This will read the file one row at a time until there are no more rows to read
            {

                string[] lineSegments = currentLine.Split(new[] { " " }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

                if (lineSegments.Length == 2 && String.Compare(lineSegments[0], "Name", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) == 0
                    && String.Compare(lineSegments[1], "Details", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) == 0) //Looking for a Name  Details Line - Start of a new section
                {
                    rowNumber++;
                    newSection = true;
                    continue;
                }

                if (newSection && lineSegments.Length > 1) //We can start adding a new person's details - we know that 
                {
                    nameValues.Add(rowNumber, new List<String>());
                    nameValues[rowNumber].Insert(nameOrdinals.IndexOf("Name"), lineSegments[0]);

                    //Get the first column:value item
                    ParseColonSeparatedItem(lineSegments[1], nameOrdinals, nameValues, rowNumber);

                    newSection = false;
                    continue;
                }

                if (lineSegments.Length > 0 && lineSegments[0] != String.Empty) //Ignore empty lines
                {
                    ParseColonSeparatedItem(lineSegments[0], nameOrdinals, nameValues, rowNumber);
                }

            }
        }


        //At this point we should have collected a big list of items. We can then write out the CSV. We can use a StringBuilder for now, although your requirements will
        //be dependent upon how big the source files are.

        //Write out the columns

        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

        for (int i = 0; i < nameOrdinals.Count; i++)
        {
            if(i == nameOrdinals.Count - 1)
            {
                builder.Append(nameOrdinals[i]);
            }
            else
            {
                builder.AppendFormat("{0},", nameOrdinals[i]);
            }
        }

        builder.Append(Environment.NewLine);


        foreach (int key in nameValues.Keys)
        {
            List<String> values = nameValues[key];

            for (int i = 0; i < values.Count; i++)
            {
                if (i == values.Count - 1)
                {
                    builder.Append(values[i]);
                }
                else
                {
                    builder.AppendFormat("{0},", values[i]);
                }
            }

            builder.Append(Environment.NewLine);

        }

        //At this point you now have a StringBuilder containing the CSV data you can write to a file or similar




    }


    private void ParseColonSeparatedItem(string textToSeparate, List<String> columns, Dictionary<Int32, List<String>> outputStorage, int outputKey)
    {

        if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(textToSeparate)) { return; }

        string[] colVals = textToSeparate.Split(new[] { ":" }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);

        List<String> outputValues = outputStorage[outputKey];

        if (!columns.Contains(colVals[0]))
        {
            //Add the column to the list of expected columns. The index of the column determines it's index in the output
            columns.Add(colVals[0]);

        }

        if (outputValues.Count < columns.Count)
        {
            outputValues.Add(colVals[1]);
        }
        else
        {
            outputStorage[outputKey].Insert(columns.IndexOf(colVals[0]), colVals[1]); //We append the value to the list at the place where the column index expects it to be. That way we can miss values in certain sections yet still have the expected output
        }
    }

After running this against your file, the string builder contains:

"Name,Age,Height,Hair,Eyes\r\nAlex,25,6,Brown,Hazel\r\n"

Which matches the above (\r\n is effectively the Windows new line marker)

This approach demonstrates how a custom parser might work - it's purposefully over verbose as there is plenty of refactoring that could take place here, and is just an example.

Improvements would include:

1) This function assumes there are no spaces in the actual text items themselves. This is a pretty big assumption and, if wrong, would require a different approach to parsing out the line segments. However, this only needs to change in one place - as you read a line at a time, you could apply a reg ex, or just read in characters and assume that everything after the first "column:" section is a value, for example.

2) No exception handling

3) Text output is not quoted. You could test each value to see if it's a date or number - if not, wrap it in quotes as then other programs (like Excel) will attempt to preserve the underlying datatypes more effectively.

4) Assumes no column names are repeated. If they are, then you have to check if a column item has already been added, and then create an ColName2 column in the parsing section.

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