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I am currently building something in JS and have run into the following scenario:

// these are set programmatically, not like this, just using as an example
var data = {'someData':'blah'};
var widget = 'NameOfWidget';
var command = 'someFunctionName';

// there is a base object that has all widgets and their commands as child objects
// format would be like: UBER.WidgetName.command(data);
// here is how I have tried to call it thus far
UBER[widget][command](data);
window['UBER'][widget][command](data);

I feel like I am close to figuring it out, just need a little help in figuring out exact syntax! Thanks!

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closed as not a real question by casperOne May 9 '12 at 13:46

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
    
Tell me what var_dump(UBER.widget.command) gives you? –  Starx May 8 '12 at 12:15
    
All of those attempts are correct syntax, assuming that your UBER object is structured like that. So if it's not working, clearly your object is not structured like that. Try doing a console.log(UBER) in something like the Chrome developer console, and explore that object a bit to see what it's like inside. If you still can't figure it out, report back what you see after the console.log –  LukeGT May 8 '12 at 12:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try:

UBER['widget']['command'](data); 
window['UBER']['widget']['command'](data);

or

UBER.widget.command(data);
window.UBER.widget.command(data);

This assumes command is a function, widget and UBER are objects, and window['UBER'] = UBER.

When you are referencing object properties using bracket syntax, you need to use a string. If using . syntax, you must use a legal string literal that is not a reserved word in Javascript.

For example:

var command = function(){return 5},
    widget = {},
    UBER = {};
UBER.widget = widget;
widget.command = command;
console.log(UBER['widget']['command']()); // prints 5 to Chrome's developer console or firebug
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Is there a reason you're not doing this?

window[UBER.widget.command](data);

Edit: I see what you're trying to do, this answer is currently incorrect should work, given that I understand what you're attempting to do.

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