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Is this class thread-safe?

class Counter {
  private ConcurrentMap<String, AtomicLong> map = 
    new ConcurrentHashMap<String, AtomicLong>();
  public long add(String name) {
    if (this.map.get(name) == null) {
      this.map.putIfAbsent(name, new AtomicLong());
    }
    return this.map.get(name).incrementAndGet();
  }
}

What do you think?

share|improve this question
    
Have you quantified the cost of creating AtomicLongs? Unless you create zillions of them it will most likely be unnoticeable. –  assylias May 8 '12 at 12:24
    
@assylias you're right, Aaron explained the problem below already (+1 to your answer) –  yegor256 May 8 '12 at 12:27
    
See my updated answer with timing (to be adjusted to your use case). –  assylias May 8 '12 at 13:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, provided you make the map final. The if is not necessary but you can keep it for performance reasons if you want, although it will most likely not make a noticeable difference:

public long add(String name) {
  this.map.putIfAbsent(name, new AtomicLong());
  return this.map.get(name).incrementAndGet();
}

EDIT

For the sake of it, I have quickly tested both implementation (with and without the check). 10 millions calls on the same string take:

  • 250 ms with the check
  • 480 ms without the check

Which confirms what I said: unless you call this method millions of time or it is in performance critical part of your code, it does not make a difference.

EDIT 2

Full test result - see the BetterCounter which yields even better results. Now the test is very specific (no contention + the get always works) and does not necessarily correspond to your usage.

Counter: 482 ms
LazyCounter: 207 ms
MPCounter: 303 ms
BetterCounter: 135 ms

public class Test {

    public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException {
        Counter count = new Counter();
        LazyCounter lazyCount = new LazyCounter();
        MPCounter mpCount = new MPCounter();
        BetterCounter betterCount = new BetterCounter();

        //WARM UP
        for (int i = 0; i < 10_000_000; i++) {
            count.add("abc");
            lazyCount.add("abc");
            mpCount.add("abc");
            betterCount.add("abc");
        }

        //TEST
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10_000_000; i++) {
            count.add("abc");
        }
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println((end - start) / 1000000);

        start = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10_000_000; i++) {
            lazyCount.add("abc");
        }
        end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println((end - start) / 1000000);

        start = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10_000_000; i++) {
            mpCount.add("abc");
        }
        end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println((end - start) / 1000000);

        start = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10_000_000; i++) {
            betterCount.add("abc");
        }
        end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println((end - start) / 1000000);        
    }

    static class Counter {

        private final ConcurrentMap<String, AtomicLong> map =
                new ConcurrentHashMap<String, AtomicLong>();

        public long add(String name) {
            this.map.putIfAbsent(name, new AtomicLong());
            return this.map.get(name).incrementAndGet();
        }
    }

    static class LazyCounter {

        private final ConcurrentMap<String, AtomicLong> map =
                new ConcurrentHashMap<String, AtomicLong>();

        public long add(String name) {
            if (this.map.get(name) == null) {
                this.map.putIfAbsent(name, new AtomicLong());
            }
            return this.map.get(name).incrementAndGet();
        }
    }

    static class BetterCounter {

        private final ConcurrentMap<String, AtomicLong> map =
                new ConcurrentHashMap<String, AtomicLong>();

            public long add(String name) {
                AtomicLong counter = this.map.get(name);
                if (counter != null)
                    return counter.incrementAndGet();

                AtomicLong newCounter = new AtomicLong();
                counter = this.map.putIfAbsent(name, newCounter);

                return (counter == null ? newCounter.incrementAndGet() : counter.incrementAndGet());
            }
    }

    static class MPCounter {

        private final ConcurrentMap<String, AtomicLong> map =
                new ConcurrentHashMap<String, AtomicLong>();

        public long add(String name) {
            final AtomicLong newVal = new AtomicLong(),
                    prevVal = map.putIfAbsent(name, newVal);
            return (prevVal != null ? prevVal : newVal).incrementAndGet();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Without if we instantiate a lot of AtomicLong objects, which is time consuming and redundant –  yegor256 May 8 '12 at 12:13
    
@yegor256: It might feel redundant but that doesn't prove that it's time consuming. Depending on the names that you use, creating too many AtomicLongs could be cheaper than searching the map 3-4 times. –  Aaron Digulla May 8 '12 at 12:24
    
@MarkoTopolnik You are right. I have edited. –  assylias May 8 '12 at 12:26
    
@assylias: putIfAbsent() returns the current instance, so you can also get rid of the call to get() –  Aaron Digulla May 8 '12 at 12:29
1  
@AaronDigulla no, putIfAbsent() returns previous value, which is NULL –  yegor256 May 8 '12 at 12:33

EDIT

Yes if you make the map final. Otherwise, it's not guaranteed that all threads see the most recent version of the map data structure when they call add() for the first time.

Several threads can reach the body of the if(). The putIfAbsent() will make sure that only a single AtomicLong is put into the map.

There should be no way that putIfAbsent() can return without the new value being in the map.

So when the second get() is executed, it will never get a null value and since only a single AtomicLong can have been added to the map, all threads will get the same instance.

[EDIT2] The next question: How efficient is this?

This code is faster since it avoids unnecessary searches:

public long add(String name) {
    AtomicLong counter = map.get( name );
    if( null == counter ) {
        map.putIfAbsent( name, new AtomicLong() );
        counter = map.get( name ); // Have to get again!!!
    }
    return counter.incrementAndGet();
}

This is why I prefer Google's CacheBuilder which has a method that is called when a key can't be found. That way, the map is searched only once and I don't have to create extra instances.

share|improve this answer
    
How do you figure? –  David Schwartz May 8 '12 at 12:12
1  
@PéterTörök With putIfAbsent ? –  assylias May 8 '12 at 12:14
    
@assylias, hmmm, yes, I was a bit too fast :-) Comment removed. –  Péter Török May 8 '12 at 12:16
2  
In your [EDIT2] you are commiting the common fallacy of assuming that putIfAbsent returns the new value under key wheras in fact it returns the previous value -- which is null when the key was absent. It's kind of retarded API, rarely useful, but there it is. –  Marko Topolnik May 8 '12 at 12:30
1  
BTW I don't think you are forced to get it again. If the return value of putIfAbsent is null, then use the instance you tried to put, otherwise use the instance returned from putIfAbsent. Performance-wise this makes an important difference. –  Marko Topolnik May 8 '12 at 12:40

No one seems to have the complete solution, which is:

  public long add(String name) {
    AtomicLong counter = this.map.get(name);
    if (counter == null) {
      AtomicLong newCounter = new AtomicLong();
      counter = this.map.putIfAbsent(name, newCounter);
      if(counter == null) {
        counter = newCounter;
      }
    }

    return counter.incrementAndGet();
  }
share|improve this answer

What about this:

class Counter {

  private final ConcurrentMap<String, AtomicLong> map = 
    new ConcurrentHashMap<String, AtomicLong>();

  public long add(String name) {
    this.map.putIfAbsent(name, new AtomicLong());
    return this.map.get(name).incrementAndGet();
  }
}

Edit: Added a quote from the Java Language Specification:

share|improve this answer
    
if is there for performance reasons –  yegor256 May 8 '12 at 12:14
    
OK, just make sure entries aren't removed once added. –  Matthias Meid May 8 '12 at 12:18
    
Each call to your add instantiates an AtomicLong. That's avoided in OP's example. –  Marko Topolnik May 8 '12 at 12:24
    
Making the map final would be good practise (and would prevent someone from later accidentially adding a method that recreates the map) but wouldn't actually effect the visibility (since it's created when the class is instantiated). –  Jens Borgland May 8 '12 at 12:29
1  
@Jens: There is no memory barrier when the constructor returns. So other threads could have stale memory in their caches. –  Aaron Digulla May 8 '12 at 12:31

This solution (note that I am showing only the body of the add method -- the rest stays the same!) spares you of any calls to get:

final AtomicLong newVal = new AtomicLong(), 
                 prevVal = map.putIfAbsent(name, newVal);
return (prevVal != null? prevVal : newVal).incrementAndGet();

In all probability an extra get is much costlier than an extra new AtomicLong().

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually slightly slower than the OP's version. –  assylias May 8 '12 at 12:56
    
True, if you go with OP's version, that's the fastest since putIfAbsent still implies a get. –  Marko Topolnik May 8 '12 at 13:05

I think you would be better off with something like this:

class Counter { 
  private ConcurrentMap<String, AtomicLong> map = new ConcurrentHashMap<String, AtomicLong>();

  public long add(String name) {
    AtomicLong counter = this.map.get(name);
    if (counter == null) {
      AtomicLong newCounter = new AtomicLong();
      counter = this.map.putIfAbsent(name, newCounter);
      if (counter == null) {
        // The new counter was added - use it
        counter = newCounter;
      }
    }

    return counter.incrementAndGet();
  }
}

Otherwise multiple threads may add simultaneously and you wouldn't notice (since you ignore the value returned by putIfAbsent).

I assume that you never recreate the map.

share|improve this answer
1  
You example is just longer, not better –  yegor256 May 8 '12 at 12:22
    
That works but I'm not sure I understand your comment "Otherwise multiple threads may add simultaneously and you wouldn't notice" - what do you mean? –  assylias May 8 '12 at 12:22
    
It's a bit faster since it searches the map only 2 times at most. The code in the question searches the map at least three times. –  Aaron Digulla May 8 '12 at 12:25
1  
Sorry, I just realized that your original solution actually is thread safe... What I meant was that you don't use the value returned by putIfAbsent but since you always retrieve the counter from the map right before incrementing it it doesn't matter. My solution has the benefit of avoiding one get operation however. –  Jens Borgland May 8 '12 at 12:26
1  
@JensBorgland It contains the same error as in other posts: putIfAbsent will return null the first time and the add method will throw a NPE. –  assylias May 8 '12 at 12:58

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