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I'm trying to implement the best code re-usability. The problem is that I can't access the base method located in the Base Abstract class form the Main Program through the repository.

If you go through the example below you will see a sample code of my situation.

So my question is how can I access methods located in the base abstract class from the main program.

Classes/Interfaces

public abstract class BaseEntity
{
    public override abstract String ToString();
}

public abstract class BaseClass<T> where T : BaseEntity
{
    public T GetById(int id)
    {
        //Dummy Code
        return new T();
        //
    }
}

public interface IFooRepository
{
    IList<Foo> GetOrderedObjects();
}

public interface FooRepository : BaseClass<Foo>, IFooRepository
{
    public IList<Foo> GetOrderedObjects()
    {
        //GetById method is accessible from the repository - Fine
        var obj = this.GetById(5);

        //Dummy Code
        return new List<Foo>();
        //
    }
}

//Main App

public class void Main()
{
    private IFooRepository _fooRepository;

    public void ProgramStartsHere()
    {
         //This is ok.
         var list = _fooRepository.GetOrderedObjects();

         //Problem is here - GetById method is not accessible from the main program through the FooRepository
         var obj = _fooRepository.GetById(10);
    }
}
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1  
Are you sure that your code is OK? I mean that interface with implemented method is wrong. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/87d83y5b(v=vs.80).aspx –  besworland May 8 '12 at 13:15
    
public interface FooRepository : BaseClass<Foo> how this can compile ? you can't derive an interface from a class –  Felice Pollano May 8 '12 at 13:49
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6 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

GetById isn't defined in the interface

I would make an

public interface IBaseRepository<T> where T : BaseEntitiy {
 T GetById<T>(int id);
}

Then BaseClass implements IBaseRepository<T>

and IFooRepository inherits from IBaseRepository<Foo>

EDIT :

A full example, similar to @Olivier J-D one, with idea (maybe wrong), that GetOrderedObject may be same for all your entities.

public abstract class BaseEntity
{
    public override abstract String ToString();
}

//all generic methods
public interface IRepositoryBase<T>
    where T : BaseEntity, new()
{
    T GetById(int id);
    IList<T> GetOrderedObjects();

}

//all methods specific to foo, which can't be in a generic class
public interface IFooRepository :IRepositoryBase<Foo>
{
    void Update(Foo model);
}

//implementation of generic methods
public abstract class BaseClass<T> : IRepositoryBase<T>
    where T : BaseEntity, new() // ===> Add new() constraint here
{
    public T GetById(int id)
    {
        return new T();
    }
    public IList<T> GetOrderedObjects() {
        var obj = this.GetById(5);

        //Dummy Code
        return new List<Foo>();
        //
    }
}

//implementation of Foo specific methods
public class FooRepository : BaseClass<Foo>, IFooRepository
{
    public void Update(Foo model) {
    //bla bla
    }
}
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I second that answer! This is the way I want to do it.. clean and reduce redundant code.. –  ŁukaszW.pl May 8 '12 at 13:17
    
Do you have a full example? Cause i got confused :/ –  user1382086 May 8 '12 at 13:43
    
Done, or look @Olivier one, they both can be used, depending on your specific needs... –  Raphaël Althaus May 8 '12 at 14:20
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Add a new Interface which declares the GetById method and let IFooRepository and BaseClass<T> inherit from it. You will have to add a generic type parameter to IFooRepository as well. (I renamed IFooRepository to IRepository<T>, since it is generic now.)

public abstract class BaseEntity
{
    public override abstract String ToString();
}

public interface IRetriever<T>
    where T : BaseEntity, new()
{
    T GetById(int id);
}

public interface IRepository<T> : IRetriever<T>
    where T : BaseEntity, new()
{
    IList<T> GetOrderedObjects();
}

public abstract class BaseClass<T> : IRetriever<T>
    where T : BaseEntity, new() // ===> Add new() constraint here
{
    public T GetById(int id)
    {
        return new T();
    }
}

public class FooRepository : BaseClass<Foo>, IRepository<Foo>
{
    public IList<Foo> GetOrderedObjects()
    {
        var obj = this.GetById(5);
        return new List<Foo>();
    }
}

This will work fine then

IRepository<Foo> _fooRepository = new FooRepository();
var list = _fooRepository.GetOrderedObjects();
var obj = _fooRepository.GetById(10);
share|improve this answer
    
Nice one... But one remark : what's the interest of two separate interfaces in your example ? If all is generic, IList<T> GetOrderedObjects() should be in IRetriever<T>, no ? and GetOrderedObject should be in BaseClass<T> as it's also generic ? –  Raphaël Althaus May 8 '12 at 13:55
    
@RaphaëlAlthaus: A separate interface makes sense, since BaseClass<T> implements GetById. Although it would work without it. If IRepository<T> declared GetById directly, FooRepository would automatically implement it by inheriting it from BaseClass<T>. However, it appears cleaner to me like this. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes May 8 '12 at 14:01
1  
@RaphaëlAlthaus: It was user1382086's decision to implement GetById in BaseClass<T> and GetOrderedObject in FooRepository. Probably because he has several repositories that can inherit the same implementation of GetById but need to implement different GetOrderedObjects methods. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes May 8 '12 at 14:07
    
That make sense, thx for argument. But "avocat du diable", why do you make it generic, then ? –  Raphaël Althaus May 8 '12 at 14:16
    
@RaphaëlAlthaus: Simply because GetById has a generic return type of T. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes May 8 '12 at 14:26
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Your _fooRepository inherits from IFooRepository, not FooRepository, so it doesn't have access to GetById(10);

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You must expose the GetById method in your repository interface.

public interface IFooRepository
{  
    IList<Foo> GetOrderedObjects();
    Foo GetById(int id);
}

Alternatively you can use a type parameter constraint, as stated by Raphaël Althaus

share|improve this answer
    
Replace T by Foo ! –  Raphaël Althaus May 8 '12 at 13:54
    
Oops! Thank you! –  JotaBe May 8 '12 at 13:56
    
replace T by Foo, not Foo by T ;) –  Raphaël Althaus May 8 '12 at 13:56
    
Oops, oops, oops!!! –  JotaBe May 8 '12 at 13:58
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IFooRepository doesn't inherit from BaseClass, so you have to cast _fooRepository to FooRepository. Then you can access GetById()

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Cast it to the base class.

var obj = ((BaseClass<Foo>)_fooRepository).GetById(10);
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9  
Casting is always a bad idea - in most cases using it shows that your OOP structure is wrong.. –  ŁukaszW.pl May 8 '12 at 13:14
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