Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to make plots on 4 axes, first three individual plot on each axes, and the last all 3 plots on last axes. Here is the code:

from numpy import *
from matplotlib.pyplot import *
fig=figure()
data=arange(0,10,0.01)
ax1=fig.add_subplot(2,2,1)
ax2=fig.add_subplot(2,2,2)
ax3=fig.add_subplot(2,2,3)
ax4=fig.add_subplot(2,2,4)

line1=ax1.plot(data,data)
line2=ax2.plot(data, data**2/10, ls='--', color='green')
line3=ax3.plot(data, np.sin(data), color='red')
#could I somehow use previous plots, instead recreating them all?
line4=ax4.plot(data,data)
line4=ax4.plot(data, data**2/10, ls='--', color='green')
line4=ax4.plot(data, np.sin(data), color='red')
show()

The resulting picture is:
enter image description here
Is there a way to define plots first and then add them to axes, and then plot them? Here is the logic I had in mind:

#this is just an example, implementation can be different
line1=plot(data, data)
line2=plot(data, data**2/10, ls='--', color='green')
line3=plot(data, np.sin(data), color='red')
line4=[line1, line2, line3]

Now plot line1 on ax1, line2 on ax2, line3 on ax3 and line4 on ax4.

share|improve this question
    
But what's wrong with calling plot again? Is that causing some problem? –  wim May 8 '12 at 13:27
    
@wim it's not causing any problems in this case. But I'm always skeptical about the code if I need to use copy paste. Or if I wanted for example to send a plots of lines to some function that arranges the plots in some way on different axes. –  enedene May 8 '12 at 13:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is one possible solution. I'm not sure that it's very pretty, but at least it does not require code duplication.

import numpy as np, copy
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt, matplotlib.lines as ml

fig=plt.figure(1)
data=np.arange(0,10,0.01)
ax1=fig.add_subplot(2,2,1)
ax2=fig.add_subplot(2,2,2)
ax3=fig.add_subplot(2,2,3)
ax4=fig.add_subplot(2,2,4)

#create the lines
line1=ml.Line2D(data,data)
line2=ml.Line2D(data,data**2/10,ls='--',color='green')
line3=ml.Line2D(data,np.sin(data),color='red')
#add the copies of the lines to the first 3 panels
ax1.add_line(copy.copy(line1))
ax2.add_line(copy.copy(line2))
ax3.add_line(copy.copy(line3))

[ax4.add_line(_l) for _l in [line1,line2,line3]] # add 3 lines to the 4th panel

[_a.autoscale() for _a in [ax1,ax2,ax3,ax4]] # autoscale if needed
plt.draw()
share|improve this answer

I think your usage is fine, but you can pass all of the x,y data pairs to plot like this (although it makes it very horrible to read!):

ax4.plot(data, data, data, data**2 / 10, data, np.sin(data))

An amusing different way to do it is like this:

graph_data = [(data, data), (data, data**2 / 10), (data, np.sin(data))]
[ax4.plot(i,j) for i,j in graph_data]
share|improve this answer
    
I usually do things the wrong way, I must be getting better. :) I upvoted both solutions, the selection for accepted answer was arbitrary. –  enedene May 8 '12 at 23:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.