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I have a project, call it 'foobar', that when I checkout has all its source in the folder "foobar/foobar". Because the top level foobar directory contains nothing except for the inner foobar directory, it's pointless, but that's how things were originally checked into the project and it's outside my control. This has the unfortunate effect of making paths longer and harder to read, so I rename the toplevel foobar to "foobar-checkout" and then make a symlink called "foobar" that links to "foobar-checkout/foobar". This way I can open "foobar/source.c" instead of "foobar/foobar/source.c".

This works for when I'm in the shell, and when I first open the file in emacs, but after that emacs will resolve the symlink. So if I have source.c open and I press Ctrl+x Ctrl+f to open a new file, the path it lists is "foobar-checkout/foobar/" rather than "foobar/". Is there a way to get emacs to not resolve the symlink so I can enjoy the shorter path?

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2 Answers 2

You might like to use directory-abbrev-alist or maybe vc-follow-symlinks.

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I've just tried this on GNU Emacs 22.2.1, and it doesn't seem to resolve my symlinks. Is it possible that the resolving of symlinks is not vanilla emacs behavior and is rather something unintentionally introduced with a file opening module, such as ffap.el?

Either way, I couldn't test my idea, but it occured to me that you might override file-symlink-p, described currently as:

file-symlink-p is a built-in function in `C source code'.

(file-symlink-p FILENAME)

Return non-nil if file FILENAME is the name of a symbolic link.
The value is the link target, as a string.
Otherwise it returns nil.

This function returns t when given the name of a symlink that
points to a nonexistent file.

If you modify that to always return nil, perhaps emacs won't resolve the symlinks:

(defun file-symlink-p (FILENAME)

Of course, this will probably break some other stuff, but maybe it's worth a shot.

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very possible it's not a vanilla emacs behavior, I do have ido mode and a million other things on, I'll try with a vanilla config and write back... – Joseph Garvin May 9 '12 at 17:35

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