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I want to give a parameter to a method and i want my method to return data by looking the parameter. Data can be in type of boolean, string, int or etc. How can i return a variable type from a method? I don't want to return an object type and then cast it to another type. For example:

BlaBla VariableReturnExampleMethod(int a)
{
    if (a == 1)
        return "Demo";
    else if (a == 2)
        return 2;
    else if (a == 3)
        return True;
    else
        return null;
}

The reason why i want that is i have a method that reads a selected column of a row from the database. Types of columns are not same but i have to return every column's information.

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2  
on a side note instead of all these if elses i say do a little research into a switch msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/06tc147t(v=vs.80).aspx –  RhysW May 8 '12 at 13:44
    
@RhysW +1 for the switch, but also in this case the else isn't required, if will suffice. –  Adam Houldsworth May 8 '12 at 13:45
    
are u sure if you have to return only a few standard types like int, string etc? or is it more classes from ur code? –  nawfal May 8 '12 at 13:49
1  
Why not use object with reflection? Usually the best choice when you don't know the data you will be dealing with in advance. –  svinja May 8 '12 at 13:49
    

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

How can i return a variable type from a method? I don't want to return an object type and then cast it to another type.

Well that's basically what you do have to do. Alternatively, if you're using C# 4 you could make the return type dynamic, which will allow the conversion to be implicit:

dynamic VariableReturnExampleMethod(int a)
{
    // Body as per question
}

...

// Fine...
int x = VariableReturnExampleMethod(2);

// This will throw an exception at execution time
int y = VariableReturnExampleMethod(1);

Fundamentally, you specify types to let the compiler know what to expect. How can that work if the type is only known at execution time? The reason the dynamic version works is that it basically tells the compiler to defer its normal work until execution time - so you lose the normal safety which would let the second example fail at compile time.

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I don't know, i am waiting your advices. –  blabla May 8 '12 at 13:45
    
@petre: It's hard to give any more advice without knowing why you wanted to do this in the first place. –  Jon Skeet May 8 '12 at 13:47
1  
I like how Jon Skeet's answer had three +1s within 1 minute of answering - even before he elaborated. Must be nice :) –  Tim May 8 '12 at 13:52
1  
@Tim Irritating more like :-) I don't think he sees the benefit from most of the +1s he gets in a day, reaches the max a lot so far as I've heard. –  Adam Houldsworth May 8 '12 at 13:55

Use dynamic Keyword in place of BlahBlah if you are targeting .Net 4.0 but if lesser one then object is your safest bet because it is the base class for every other class you can think of.

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It sounds like this might be a good case for generics. If you know what data type you're expecting when you call it, you can call that particular generic version of the function.

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Although generics can help in other situations, it won't help in the situation provided by the OP unless the caller knows the type going to be returned by the argument provided at compile time... unlikely. –  Adam Houldsworth May 8 '12 at 13:46
    
@Adam Houldsworth - Based on his description of the problem (the fact that this was a call that returned values from a database) it seemed like the calling code might actually know what it is expecting. It sounds like maybe he has a ReadFromDatabase(fieldname) function, and you probably would actually know the datatype of the field in that case. That's not a good design, in my opinion, but generics would make it easier. –  Tim May 8 '12 at 13:48
    
Consider Field<T> from DataTable as an example of this. The only good options are this or just returning object, and as OP ruled out the other option, this is what remains. –  Servy May 8 '12 at 13:49
    
@Tim Agreed, but removing the option of casting may extend to something like this. It really depends what the calling code looks like and what the intended usage is afterwards. Using generics just moves the casting inside the method, the caller still needs to state a type. –  Adam Houldsworth May 8 '12 at 13:50

Consider using something like Dapper-dot-net (written by Marc Gravell and Sam Saffron at our very own Stack Overflow) to pull things out of the DB. It handles the database to object mapping for you.

Furthermore, if you don't want to use a tool, and you're pulling from a Database, and you know the data types of the various columns at compile time (like it sounds you do), you should probably be working row-by-row rather than column-by-column.

//Pseudo-code:
List<DatabaseObject> objects = new List<DatabaseObject>();
foreach(var row in DatabaseRows)
{
    var toAdd = new DatabaseObject();
    toAdd.StringTypeVariable = "Demo";
    toAdd.IntTypeVariable = 2;
    toAdd.BoolTypeVariable = true;
    object.Add(toAdd);
}

Note: you could use object initializer syntax, and linq here but this is the most basic way I could think of demoing this without using a ton of extra stuff.

Also note, that here I'm assuming that you don't actually want to return "Demo", 2, and true, but values that use the row. That just means you'd change the hard coded values to: row.GetStringType(stringColumnIdx) or something similar.

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+1 for the recommendation for row-by-row rather than column-by-column –  Bob2Chiv May 8 '12 at 14:58

Use return type as object, then you are able to get any return type. you have to handle the return type ether through reflection or other method.

check this:

void Main()
{
    object aa = VariableReturnExampleMethod(3);
    Console.WriteLine(aa.ToString());
}

object VariableReturnExampleMethod(int a)
{
    if (a == 1)
        return "Demo";
    else if (a == 2)
        return 2;
    else if (a == 3)
        return true;
    else
        return null;
}

Edit: I am in the favor of strongly typed objects and you can implement it easily on .net platform.

if(returnedValue !=null)
{

string currentDataType = returnedValue.GetType().Name;
object valueObj = GetValueByValidating(currentDataType, stringValue);
}


 public object GetValueByValidating(string strCurrentDatatype, object valueObj)
        {
            if (valueObj != "")
            {
                if (strCurrentDatatype.ToLower().Contains("int"))
                {
                    valueObj = Convert.ToInt32(valueObj);
                }
                else if (strCurrentDatatype.ToLower().Contains("decimal"))
                {
                    valueObj = Convert.ToDecimal(valueObj);
                }
                else if (strCurrentDatatype.ToLower().Contains("double") || strCurrentDatatype.ToLower().Contains("real"))
                {
                    valueObj = Convert.ToDouble(valueObj);
                }
                else if (strCurrentDatatype.ToLower().Contains("string"))
                {
                    valueObj = Convert.ToString(valueObj);
                }
                else
                {
                    valueObj = valueObj.ToString();
                }
            }
            else
            {
                valueObj = null;
            }
            return valueObj;
        }
share|improve this answer
    
He explicitly asked for a solution that didn't casting –  Christopher Pfohl May 8 '12 at 13:56

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