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OK, file contents:

asdasd0
**asdasd1**
asdasd2
asdasd3
asdasd4
**asdasd5**
asdasd6

I want to move "^asdasd5" RegEx matched line before "^asdasd1" RegEx matched line:

asdasd0
**asdasd5**
**asdasd1**
asdasd2
asdasd3
asdasd4
asdasd6

Howto?

Thanks

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This is obviously not what you really want to do. You shouldn't "dumb down" your example to a point where any answer you can get isn't going to work with your real data. Please show what your actual requirements are (and also what approaches you have already tried). –  Tim Pietzcker May 8 '12 at 14:00
    
I think the question is not well edited, because the bold doesn't work inside code tags. I didn't fix it because I'm not sure. Do it yourself to avoid confusion. –  Birei May 8 '12 at 14:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's not clear what your pattern is - what is constant, and what is changing.

sed "/.*5/d;/.*1/i"$(sed -n '/.*5/p' FILE)  FILE

I delete the line containing a 5, and insert that line behind the line containing the 1.

You can't work with -i here, since the file is his own reference.

sed "/.*5/d;/.*1/i"$(sed -n '/.*5/p' FILE)  FILE > FILE.tmp 
mv FILE.tmp FILE
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That's it, great! –  GioMac May 8 '12 at 14:48

One way using perl:

s/^(asdasd1.*)(^asdasd5(?:\n|$))/$2$1/sm

An example. Content of script.pl:

use warnings;
use strict;

my $data;

## Read all DATA content into $data variable.
do { 
    $/ = undef;
    $data = <DATA>;
};

## Last 's' flag lets '.*' match newlines.
## 'm' flag lets '^' and '$' match at the beginning or end of each line.
$data =~ s/^(asdasd1.*)(^asdasd5(?:\n|$))/$2$1/sm;

print $data;

__DATA__
asdasd0
asdasd1
asdasd2
asdasd3
asdasd4
asdasd5
asdasd6

Run it like:

perl script.pl

With following output:

asdasd0
asdasd5
asdasd1
asdasd2
asdasd3
asdasd4
asdasd6
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, worked well! Let's see other solutions... –  GioMac May 8 '12 at 14:21

This might work for you:

sed '/asdasd1/,/asdasd5/{/asdasd5/{G;b};/asdasd1/{h;d};H;d}' file
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Thanks, but got same output –  GioMac May 8 '12 at 14:21

Since this is line-oriented, you don't really need a regular expression for this. When you see the start line, begin to capture the lines. When you see the ending line, print it, print the captured lines, and then print the rest of the file:

awk -v start=asdasd1 -v end=asdasd5 '
    match($0,start) {capture=1}
    match($0,end)   {print $0 captured; capture=0; next}
    capture         {captured = captured RS $0; next}
    1
'
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Here's a way to do it using ex:

ex inputfile <<'EOF'
/^asdasd5
d
/^asdasd1
-
put
wq
EOF

The same thing all on one line:

printf '%s\n' '/^asdasd5' 'd' '/^asdasd1' '-' 'put' 'wq' | ex inputfile
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use sed's command 'i' to insert before pattern. See http://www.grymoire.com/Unix/Sed.html#uh-41

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