Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Instead of using keywords like FULL OUTER JOIN or FULL JOIN, how can I perform full outer join using 'where' clause with the help of '+' operator?!

share|improve this question
4  
You would have to UNION together the results of 2 outer join queries (one for A -> B and one for B -> A) –  Tony Andrews May 8 '12 at 13:56
2  
why would you want to? Use explicit joins, it's the preferred method. Implicit joins area SQL antipattern. –  HLGEM May 8 '12 at 14:23
3  
Why would you want to do that? Just use the FULL OUTER JOIN syntax (using explicit ANSI style joins over implict joins is highly recommended anyway) –  a_horse_with_no_name May 8 '12 at 14:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can't (at least directly). Oracle only supports a full outer join using SQL:1999 syntax.

You can fake it by unioning two outer joins:

select a.field1, b.field2
from table_a a, table_b b
where a.id = b.id(+)
union all 
select a.field1, b.field2
from table_a a, table b b
where a.id(+) = b.id
      and a.id is null

It's a lot more readable using the SQL:1999 syntax:

select a.field1, b.field2
from table_a a full outer join table_b b
on a.id = b.id
share|improve this answer
    
thanks Allan... –  Munna89 May 8 '12 at 15:45

Here's an example you can run in oracle to see the results for yourself as well.

with 
a as 
   (select 'A' tbl, level id from dual connect by level < 1000),
b as 
   (select 'B' tbl, level + 500 id from dual connect by level < 1000)
select a.tbl, a.id, b.tbl, b.id from a, b where a.id = b.id(+)
union all
select a.tbl, a.id, b.tbl, b.id from a, b where a.id(+) = b.id and a.id is null

Is the same as:

with 
a as 
   (select 'A' tbl, level id from dual connect by level < 1000),
b as 
   (select 'B' tbl, level + 500 id from dual connect by level < 1000)
select a.tbl, a.id, b.tbl, b.id from a full outer join b on a.id = b.id
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.