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I have a square div of fixed size and wish to place an arbitrary size image inside so that it is centred both horizontally and vertically, using CSS. Horizontally is easy:

.container { text-align: center }

For the vertical, the common solution is:

.container {
    height: 50px;
    line-height: 50px;
}
img {
    vertical-align: middle;
}

But this is not perfect, depending on the font size, the image will be around 2-4px too far down.

To my understanding, this is because the "middle" used for vertical-align is not really the middle, but a particular position on the font that is close to the middle. A (slightly hacky) workaround would be:

container {
    font-size: 0;
}

and this works in Chrome and IE7, but not IE8. We are hoping to make all font lines the same point, in the middle, but it seems to be hit-and-miss depending on the browser and, probably, the font used.

The only solution I can think of is to hack the line-height, making it slightly shorter, to make the image appear in the right location, but it seems extremely fragile. Is there a better solution?

See a demo of all three solutions here: http://jsfiddle.net/usvrj/3/

Those without IE8 may find this screenshot useful:

IE8 screenshot when font-size is set to 0

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2  
+1 just for asking a well written question with a very neat demo! –  bPratik May 8 '12 at 14:13
    
I achieved something similar by using jQuery and calculating the margins on page load. Not pretty, but it worked in IE6+ & Co. –  lexalizer May 8 '12 at 14:22
    
Have you tried adding display: table-cell; to the container? It is my understanding that the vertical-align property can have two different meanings, one for table cell content, and one for inline elements. –  MrSlayer May 8 '12 at 14:23
    
display: table-cell looks to be the same, example 4 at jsfiddle.net/usvrj/6 –  Steve May 8 '12 at 15:14
    
What about the table itself? It also has this problems? –  Cesar Canassa May 9 '12 at 21:58
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about using your image as a background? This way you could center it consistently everywhere. Something along these lines:

margin:5px;
padding:0;
background:url(http://dummyimage.com/50) no-repeat center center red;
height:60px;
width:60px;
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This isn't an exact solution to the problem, but it seems to be the only way to get a perfect position, so I'll accept it. It's either this, or accept a small line-height hack in the CSS. –  Steve Oct 11 '12 at 22:35
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This is REALLY hacky, but it is what we used to do in the ie6 days.

.container {
     position: relative;
}
img {
     position: absolute;
     top: 50%;
     left: 50%;
     margin-top: -12px; // half of whatever the image's height is, assuming 24px
     margin-left: -12px; // half of whatever the image's width is, assuming 24px
}

I may be missing something in this example, but you get the idea.

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This is a great way to center things, not a IE6 hack. But this solution doesn't works for him since the image size is arbitrary, so there is no way to calculate the margins. –  Cesar Canassa May 9 '12 at 21:39
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Have you tried the following:

img {
    display: block;
    line-height: 0;
}

I usually use this hack, but I haven't really checked it that thoroughly in IE8.

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Can you give an example of it working in any browser? Vertical align doesn't work with display: block, so I'm not seeing how this would work. –  Steve May 8 '12 at 15:13
    
You're right, you would also need a display: table-cell on the parent container. Maybe try just the line-height: 0 ? –  Mateusz Hajdziony May 8 '12 at 15:17
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