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I'm trying to compare my highscore that I saved in A file to compare with an integer. So I always will get three characters out of my file, butt if I control it it doesn't put my new score in it.

try{
                String FILENAME = "HanoiScore1File";
                FileInputStream fos = openFileInput(FILENAME);
                byte[] b = new byte[2];
                fos.read(b);
                fos.close();
                Data = new String(b);
                Score2 = Integer.parseInt(Data);
            }catch (java.io.FileNotFoundException e) {
              } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            if(Score2>Score){
                try{
                    String FILENAME="HanoiScore1File";
                    Data=Integer.toString(Score);
                    FileOutputStream fostemp = openFileOutput(FILENAME, Context.MODE_PRIVATE);
                    fostemp.write(Data.getBytes());
                    fostemp.close();
                } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                } catch (IOException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
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closed as not a real question by casperOne May 9 '12 at 15:05

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
The code byte[] b = new byte[2]; fos.read(b); only reads 2 bytes from the file, not 3 as you write in your question. Also, what is the current content of the file? What is the "high score" that you are comparing it to? –  David Wasser May 8 '12 at 15:15
    
It was only A type mistake because in an other file its 3 bytes. the high score I comparing with is Score, and in Score2 comes the one out of the file –  stevedc May 9 '12 at 14:40
    
What is the current content of the file "HanoiScore1File"? Can you post that please? Also, just add some debug logging so that you see what the value of "Score2" and "Score" are before you compare them. –  David Wasser May 9 '12 at 14:44
    
It is solved it was A combination of the answer, and my own stupid mistake. I posted an answer for it –  stevedc May 9 '12 at 15:01

2 Answers 2

If you are really concerned with storing the score as two bytes to save on space, you'll need to use a combination of bit shifting and bitwise operators like:

    int score = 2839;
    byte a = (byte)(score & 255);
    byte b = (byte)(score >> 2);

However, if you are a litte more lenient on space, you can do something simple like:

    String FILENAME = "HanoiScore1File";

    //Read the score
    Scanner scanner = new Scanner(new File(FILENAME));
    int Score = scanner.nextInt();
    scanner.close();

    //Write the score
    PrintWriter printWriter = new PrintWriter(new File(FILENAME));
    printWriter.println(Score);
    printWriter.close();
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I tryed the second method because I don't worry about space problem. In score the first time comes A 0, but it's stayed A 0, it never change. –  stevedc May 9 '12 at 14:39
up vote 0 down vote accepted
String FILENAME = "HanoiScore1File";

//Read the score
Scanner scanner = new Scanner(new File(FILENAME));
int Score = scanner.nextInt();
scanner.close();

//Write the score
PrintWriter printWriter = new PrintWriter(new File(FILENAME));
printWriter.println(Score);
printWriter.close();

This Works but the mistake I made was

if (Score2>Score)

Score2 was always 0, which will never be bigger than Score, so It didn't save the high score.

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