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I am writing an object that must always have certain values. Most notably, it must always have a value for Name property.

public class User
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public User(string name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }
}

Now, there are a couple of business rules that I need to implement in this class. One of which is that the Name property must be a unique name. So, I would think that the initializer for this object would look something this:

    public User(string name, IQueryable<User> allUsers)
    {
        var matches = allUsers.Where(q => q.Name == name).ToList();
        if(matches.Any())
        {
            // abort object initialization
        }
        Name = name;
    }

But I'm not sure how I would abort the object initialization. In fact, is that even possible?

Is there a way to abort an object initialization (ie: set object to null) or is there a better way of accomplishing this?

share|improve this question
    
a brute force way, set all fields to null, add the object with null fields, remove the object –  RhysW May 8 '12 at 15:00
2  
This may just be sample code but in case it isn't: You can supply a predicate to Any, so you don't have to go through Where. –  Brian Rasmussen May 8 '12 at 15:01
    
@BrianRasmussen Both have the exact same result, so it's really personal preference which you use. The ToList call on the other hand prevents Any's short circuiting from not evaluating the entire query. –  Servy May 8 '12 at 15:11
    
@Servy: Sure, I'm not saying he must use Any, but it's an option and if the list is not needed, it's simpler and possibly faster too. –  Brian Rasmussen May 8 '12 at 16:08
    
Thanks for the tip about .Any() –  quakkels May 9 '12 at 14:28

9 Answers 9

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Aborting initialization of an object is done by throwing an exception in the constructor, and is recommended to reject invalid input.

public class User
{
    public User(String name) {
        if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(name)) {
            if (name == null) {
                throw new System.ArgumentNullException("Cannot be null.", "name");
            }
            else {
                throw new System.ArgumentException("Cannot be empty.", "name");
            }
        }
    }
}

The business logic you wish to define in the constructor doesn't fit there. Constructors should be lightweight, and instantiation only. Querying some data source is too expensive for a constructor. Because of this, you should use the factory pattern instead. With the factory pattern, a caller might expect there to be some heavy lifting involved with object creation.

public class User
{
    private User(String name) {
        if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(name)) {
            if (name == null) {
                throw new System.ArgumentNullException("Cannot be null.", "name");
            }
            else {
                throw new System.ArgumentException("Cannot be empty.", "name");
            }
        }
    }

    public static User CreateUser(String name) {
        User user = new User(name); // Lightweight instantiation, basic validation

        var matches = allUsers.Where(q => q.Name == name).ToList();

        if(matches.Any())           
        {           
            throw new System.ArgumentException("User with the specified name already exists.", "name");         
        }     

        Name = name;
    }

    public String Name {
        get;
        private set; // Optionally public if needed
    }
}

You can see that the factory pattern fits better, and because it's a method a caller might expect there to be some work going on by invoking it. Whereas with a constructor one would expect it to be lightweight.

If you wanted to go the constructor route, then you would want to try some other method of enforcing your business rules such as when the actual insert into the data source is attempted.

public class User
{
    public User(String name) {
        if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(name)) {
            if (name == null) {
                throw new System.ArgumentNullException("Cannot be null.", "name");
            }
            else {
                throw new System.ArgumentException("Cannot be empty.", "name");
            }
        }
    }
}

public class SomeDataSource {
    public void AddUser(User user) {
        // Do your business validation here, and either throw or possibly return a value
        // If business rules pass, then add the user
        Users.Add(user);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for such a detailed answer! I've been persuaded to go the Factory Pattern route that you outlined. –  quakkels May 9 '12 at 14:28
    
You're very welcome, glad I could help. –  David Anderson - DCOM May 9 '12 at 14:47

Well, you'd just throw an exception. But I don't like this way of handling this problem at all. Rather, you should be creating the user through the service, and have the service check if the name is valid or not.

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I suppose you could check and throw an exception in the object's constructor or Name setter, but eeeehhhh that can come with a host of issues and mixed concerns. I say create the object through a factory that does this check and returns null (or a nicely named exception). Or create the POCO object and do the validation via a separate class/method.

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Instead of having a public constructor, have a method like this and a private constructor:

public static User CreateUser(string name)
{
      // Check whether user already exists, if so, throw exception / return null

      // If name didn't exist, record that this user name is now taken.
      // Construct and return the user object
      return new User(name);
}

private User(string name)
{
       this.Name = name;
}

Then your calling code could use User myUser = User.CreateUser("Steve"); and handle null return / exception accordingly.

It's worth adding that whatever method you are using that stores which usernames are taken, should be updated to say that this name is taken within the CreateUser method. Otherwise, if you wait a while before storing this object in a database or something, you will still have problems. I've updated the code above to make this clearer.

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1  
This way you can use a static IQueryable to hold all users (or a reference to a all users repository) and avoid race conditions with locking. –  SWeko May 8 '12 at 15:04
    
@SWeko Both this method and using a constructor have race conditions if there are no locks, and both can remove the race conditions by adding the appropriate locks. –  Servy May 8 '12 at 15:13

You should probably check for the duplicate name before creating the User.

share|improve this answer
1  
You could get a race condition. –  jason May 8 '12 at 14:58
    
You always can get race conditions :-) –  Steven May 8 '12 at 15:02

Personally, I run logic checks before I instantiate. For example:

if(UserLogic.PreInsertValidation(string username)){
   User newUser = new User(username);
}
else{
  // Handling - maybe show message on client "The username is already in use."
}

The PreInsertValidation would have all business logic checks based on your requirements.

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What you are looking for is the identity map pattern, or a sort of this. It is probably wrong to leave this responsibility in the object itself, it should be done in the component creating the entities. of course the map shoul be thread safe if required, to avoid race conditions.

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I would handle this in the commit of having the user in the collection. For example, if you were editing a collection of users and then persistent them to the database, the persistence layer would be responsible for the validation. I have always considered it bad practice to have an object be responsible for maintaining all other objects just like it. It introduces a parent child relationship with the object itself when there is none. I suggest implementing a validation engine of some sorts to handle this.

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Instead of doing this validation inside the object itself, put the creation, validation and saving of this entity in a service. This service can throw an ValidationException when the user name is not unique, and could even begin a transaction to ensure that no race condition can occur. A good model I use is the command / handler pattern. Here's an example:

public class CreateNewUserCommand
{
    public string UserName { get; set; }
}

internal class CreateNewUserCommandHandler
    : ICommandHandler<CreateNewUserCommand>
{
    private readonly IUnitOfWork uow;

    public CreateNewUserCommandHandler(
        IUnitOfWork uow)
    {
        this.uow = uow;
    }

    public void Handle(CreateNewUserCommand command)
    {
        // TODO Validation

        var user = new User { Name = command.Name };

        this.uow.Users.InsertOnSubmit(user);
    }
}

You could even extra the validation into its own class.

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