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How can I load a CSV file into a System.Data.DataTable, creating the datatable based on the CSV file?

Is there a class library for this or can I use ADO.net to connect to the file?

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16 Answers 16

up vote 52 down vote accepted

Here's an excellent class that will copy CSV data into a datatable using the structure of the data to create the DataTable:

A portable and efficient generic parser for flat files

It's easy to configure and easy to use. I urge you to take a look.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent indeed. It worked perfectly for me out of the box, without even reading the documentation. –  smirkingman May 29 '13 at 10:24
    
Will this work on CSV files where each row may be of a different structure? I have a log file with different types of logged event that would need to be separated out into multiple tables. –  gonzobrains Dec 27 '13 at 18:18

I have been using OleDb provider. However, it has problems if you are reading in rows that have look like numeric values but you want them treated as text. However you can get around that issue by creating a schema.ini file. Here is my method I used:

// using System.Data;
// using System.Data.OleDb;
// using System.Globalization;
// using System.IO;

static DataTable GetDataTableFromCsv(string path, bool isFirstRowHeader)
{
    string header = isFirstRowHeader ? "Yes" : "No";

    string pathOnly = Path.GetDirectoryName(path);
    string fileName = Path.GetFileName(path);

    string sql = @"SELECT * FROM [" + fileName + "]";

    using(OleDbConnection connection = new OleDbConnection(
              @"Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;Data Source=" + pathOnly + 
              ";Extended Properties=\"Text;HDR=" + header + "\""))
    using(OleDbCommand command = new OleDbCommand(sql, connection))
    using(OleDbDataAdapter adapter = new OleDbDataAdapter(command))
    {
        DataTable dataTable = new DataTable();
        dataTable.Locale = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture;
        adapter.Fill(dataTable);
        return dataTable;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks buddy. That helped for me. I had a CSV file in which commas weren't only separators, they were everywhere inside many columns values, so coming up with a regex that would split the line was kinda challenging. The OleDbProvider inferred the schema correctly. –  Galilyou Jan 14 '12 at 10:41
    
The implementation makes sense but how do we deal with cells containing mixed data types. For example, 40C and etc.? –  GKED Feb 16 '12 at 2:12

We always used to use the Jet.OLEDB driver, until we started going to 64 bit applications. Microsoft has not and will not release a 64 bit Jet driver. Here's a simple solution we came up with that uses File.ReadAllLines and String.Split to read and parse the CSV file and manually load a DataTable. As noted above, it DOES NOT handle the situation where one of the column values contains a comma. We use this mostly for reading custom configuration files - the nice part about using CSV files is that we can edit them in Excel.

string CSVFilePathName = @"C:\test.csv";
string[] Lines = File.ReadAllLines(CSVFilePathName);
string[] Fields;
Fields = Lines[0].Split(new char[] { ',' });
int Cols = Fields.GetLength(0);
DataTable dt = new DataTable();
//1st row must be column names; force lower case to ensure matching later on.
for (int i = 0; i < Cols; i++)
    dt.Columns.Add(Fields[i].ToLower(), typeof(string));
DataRow Row;
for (int i = 1; i < Lines.GetLength(0); i++)
{
    Fields = Lines[i].Split(new char[] { ',' });
    Row = dt.NewRow();
    for (int f = 0; f < Cols; f++)
        Row[f] = Fields[f];
    dt.Rows.Add(Row);
}
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I have decided to use Sebastien Lorion's Csv Reader.

Jay Riggs suggestion is a great solution also, but I just didn't need all of the features that that Andrew Rissing's Generic Parser provides.

UDPATE 10/25/2010

After using Sebastien Lorion's Csv Reader in my project for nearly a year and a half, I have found that it throws exceptions when parsing some csv files that I believe to be well formed.

So, I did switch to Andrew Rissing's Generic Parser and it seems to be doing much better.

UDPATE 9/22/2014

These days, I mostly use this extension method to read delimited text:

https://github.com/Core-Techs/Common/blob/master/CoreTechs.Common/Text/DelimitedTextExtensions.cs#L22

https://www.nuget.org/packages/CoreTechs.Common/

share|improve this answer
    
I agree that Sebastien Lorien's CSV reader is great. I use it for heavy CSV processing, but I've also used Andrew's Rissing's for small jobs and it's served me well. Have fun! –  Jay Riggs Jun 26 '09 at 17:36
public DataTable CsvFileToDatatable(string path, bool IsFirstRowHeader)//here Path is root of file and IsFirstRowHeader is header is there or not
        {
            string header = "No";
            string sql = string.Empty;
            DataTable dataTable = null;
            string pathOnly = string.Empty;
            string fileName = string.Empty;

            try
            {

                pathOnly = Path.GetDirectoryName(path);
                fileName = Path.GetFileName(path);

                sql = @"SELECT * FROM [" + fileName + "]";

                if (IsFirstRowHeader)
                {
                    header = "Yes";
                }

                using (OleDbConnection connection = new OleDbConnection(
                        @"Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;Data Source=" + pathOnly +
                        ";Extended Properties=\"Text;HDR=" + header + "\""))
                {
                    using (OleDbCommand command = new OleDbCommand(sql, connection))
                    {
                        using (OleDbDataAdapter adapter = new OleDbDataAdapter(command))
                        {
                            dataTable = new DataTable();
                            dataTable.Locale = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture;
                            adapter.Fill(dataTable);

                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            finally
            {

            }

            return dataTable;

        }
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this is the code i use it but your apps must run with net version 3.5

private void txtRead_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
           // var filename = @"d:\shiptest.txt";

            openFileDialog1.InitialDirectory = "d:\\";
            openFileDialog1.Filter = "txt files (*.txt)|*.txt|All files (*.*)|*.*";
            DialogResult result = openFileDialog1.ShowDialog();
            if (result == DialogResult.OK)
            {
                if (openFileDialog1.FileName != "")
                {
                    var reader = ReadAsLines(openFileDialog1.FileName);

                    var data = new DataTable();

                    //this assume the first record is filled with the column names
                    var headers = reader.First().Split(',');
                    foreach (var header in headers)
                    {
                        data.Columns.Add(header);
                    }

                    var records = reader.Skip(1);
                    foreach (var record in records)
                    {
                        data.Rows.Add(record.Split(','));
                    }

                    dgList.DataSource = data;
                }
            }
        }

        static IEnumerable<string> ReadAsLines(string filename)
        {
            using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(filename))
                while (!reader.EndOfStream)
                    yield return reader.ReadLine();
        }
share|improve this answer
    
This is pretty much what I wanted to present. –  Juann Strauss Feb 12 '13 at 18:25

I came across this piece of code that uses Linq and regex to parse a CSV file. The refering article is now over a year and a half old, but have not come across a neater way to parse a CSV using Linq (and regex) than this. The caveat is the regex applied here is for comma delimited files (will detect commas inside quotes!) and that it may not take well to headers, but there is a way to overcome these). Take a peak:

Dim lines As String() = System.IO.File.ReadAllLines(strCustomerFile)
Dim pattern As String = ",(?=(?:[^""]*""[^""]*"")*(?![^""]*""))"
Dim r As System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex = New System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(pattern)
Dim custs = From line In lines _
            Let data = r.Split(line) _
                Select New With {.custnmbr = data(0), _
                                 .custname = data(1)}
For Each cust In custs
    strCUSTNMBR = Replace(cust.custnmbr, Chr(34), "")
    strCUSTNAME = Replace(cust.custname, Chr(34), "")
Next
share|improve this answer

Modified from Mr ChuckBevitt

Working solution:

string CSVFilePathName = APP_PATH + "Facilities.csv";

        string[] Lines = File.ReadAllLines(CSVFilePathName);
        string[] Fields;
        Fields = Lines[0].Split(new char[] { ',' });
        int Cols = Fields.GetLength(0);
        DataTable dt = new DataTable();
        //1st row must be column names; force lower case to ensure matching later on.
        for (int i = 0; i < Cols-1; i++)
            dt.Columns.Add(Fields[i].ToLower(), typeof(string));
        DataRow Row;
        for (int i = 0; i < Lines.GetLength(0)-1; i++)
        {
            Fields = Lines[i].Split(new char[] { ',' });
            Row = dt.NewRow();
            for (int f = 0; f < Cols-1; f++)
                Row[f] = Fields[f];
            dt.Rows.Add(Row);
        }
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public class Csv
{
    public static DataTable DataSetGet(string filename, string separatorChar, out List<string> errors)
    {
        errors = new List<string>();
        var table = new DataTable("StringLocalization");
        using (var sr = new StreamReader(filename, Encoding.Default))
        {
            string line;
            var i = 0;
            while (sr.Peek() >= 0)
            {
                try
                {
                    line = sr.ReadLine();
                    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(line)) continue;
                    var values = line.Split(new[] {separatorChar}, StringSplitOptions.None);
                    var row = table.NewRow();
                    for (var colNum = 0; colNum < values.Length; colNum++)
                    {
                        var value = values[colNum];
                        if (i == 0)
                        {
                            table.Columns.Add(value, typeof (String));
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            row[table.Columns[colNum]] = value;
                        }
                    }
                    if (i != 0) table.Rows.Add(row);
                }
                catch(Exception ex)
                {
                    errors.Add(ex.Message);
                }
                i++;
            }
        }
        return table;
    }
}
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Here's a solution that uses ADO.Net's ODBC text driver:

Dim csvFileFolder As String = "C:\YourFileFolder"
Dim csvFileName As String = "YourFile.csv"

'Note that the folder is specified in the connection string,
'not the file. That's specified in the SELECT query, later.
Dim connString As String = "Driver={Microsoft Text Driver (*.txt; *.csv)};Dbq=" _
    & csvFileFolder & ";Extended Properties=""Text;HDR=No;FMT=Delimited"""
Dim conn As New Odbc.OdbcConnection(connString)

'Open a data adapter, specifying the file name to load
Dim da As New Odbc.OdbcDataAdapter("SELECT * FROM [" & csvFileName & "]", conn)
'Then fill a data table, which can be bound to a grid
Dim dt As New DataTableda.Fill(dt)

grdCSVData.DataSource = dt

Once filled, you can value properties of the datatable, like ColumnName, to make utilize all the powers of the ADO.Net data objects.

In VS2008 you can use Linq to achieve the same effect.

NOTE: This may be a duplicate of this SO question.

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The best option I have found, and it resolves issues where you may have different versions of Office installed, and also 32/64-bit issues like Chuck Bevitt mentioned, is FileHelpers.

It can be added to your project references using NuGet and it provides a one-liner solution:

CommonEngine.CsvToDataTable(path, "ImportRecord", ',', true);
share|improve this answer
    
can u tell what is CommonEngine? Is NuGet same with NuGet.Core. I found only NuGet.Core in references –  sindhu jampani May 14 at 11:51
    
It is FileHelpers you need. If you have NuGet, add it with NuGet. Otherwise, just add it as an assembly in your project. CommonEngine is part of FileHelpers. –  Neo May 14 at 15:28

For those of you wishing not to use an external library, and prefer not to use OleDB, see the example below. Everything I found was either OleDB, external library, or simply splitting based on a comma! For my case OleDB was not working so I wanted something different.

I found an article by MarkJ that referenced the Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser method as seen here. The article is written in VB and doesn't return a datatable, so see my example below.

public static DataTable LoadCSV(string path, bool hasHeader)
    {
        DataTable dt = new DataTable();

        using (var MyReader = new Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser(path))
        {
            MyReader.TextFieldType = Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FieldType.Delimited;
            MyReader.Delimiters = new String[] { "," };

            string[] currentRow;

            //'Loop through all of the fields in the file.  
            //'If any lines are corrupt, report an error and continue parsing.  
            bool firstRow = true;
            while (!MyReader.EndOfData)
            {
                try
                {
                    currentRow = MyReader.ReadFields();

                    //Add the header columns
                    if (hasHeader && firstRow)
                    {
                        foreach (string c in currentRow)
                        {
                            dt.Columns.Add(c, typeof(string));
                        }

                        firstRow = false;
                        continue;
                    }

                    //Create a new row
                    DataRow dr = dt.NewRow();
                    dt.Rows.Add(dr);

                    //Loop thru the current line and fill the data out
                    for(int c = 0; c < currentRow.Count(); c++)
                    {
                        dr[c] = currentRow[c];
                    }
                }
                catch (Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.MalformedLineException ex)
                {
                    //Handle the exception here
                }
            }
        }

        return dt;
    }
share|improve this answer

You can achieve it by using Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser dll in C#

static void Main()
        {
            string csv_file_path=@"C:\Users\Administrator\Desktop\test.csv";

            DataTable csvData = GetDataTabletFromCSVFile(csv_file_path);

            Console.WriteLine("Rows count:" + csvData.Rows.Count);

            Console.ReadLine();
        }


private static DataTable GetDataTabletFromCSVFile(string csv_file_path)
        {
            DataTable csvData = new DataTable();

            try
            {

            using(TextFieldParser csvReader = new TextFieldParser(csv_file_path))
                {
                    csvReader.SetDelimiters(new string[] { "," });
                    csvReader.HasFieldsEnclosedInQuotes = true;
                    string[] colFields = csvReader.ReadFields();
                    foreach (string column in colFields)
                    {
                        DataColumn datecolumn = new DataColumn(column);
                        datecolumn.AllowDBNull = true;
                        csvData.Columns.Add(datecolumn);
                    }

                    while (!csvReader.EndOfData)
                    {
                        string[] fieldData = csvReader.ReadFields();
                        //Making empty value as null
                        for (int i = 0; i < fieldData.Length; i++)
                        {
                            if (fieldData[i] == "")
                            {
                                fieldData[i] = null;
                            }
                        }
                        csvData.Rows.Add(fieldData);
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
            }
            return csvData;
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Please do not attempt to re-invent the wheel with CSV processing. There's so many great open source alternatives out there that are very robust. –  Mike Cole Jan 14 at 23:38
    
Thanks Brad, useful tip in relation to the TextFieldParser for handling embedded quotes. –  mattpm Mar 6 at 11:37

Can't resist adding my own spin to this. This is so much better and more compact than what I've used in the past.

This solution:

  • Does not depend on a database driver or 3rd party library.
  • Will not fail on duplicate column names
  • Handles commas in the data
  • Handles any delimiter, not just commas (although that is the default)

Here's what I came up with:

  Public Function ToDataTable(FileName As String, Optional Delimiter As String = ",") As DataTable
    ToDataTable = New DataTable
    Using TextFieldParser As New Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser(FileName) With
      {.HasFieldsEnclosedInQuotes = True, .TextFieldType = Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FieldType.Delimited, .TrimWhiteSpace = True}
      With TextFieldParser
        .SetDelimiters({Delimiter})
        .ReadFields.ToList.Unique.ForEach(Sub(x) ToDataTable.Columns.Add(x))
        ToDataTable.Columns.Cast(Of DataColumn).ToList.ForEach(Sub(x) x.AllowDBNull = True)
        Do Until .EndOfData
          ToDataTable.Rows.Add(.ReadFields.Select(Function(x) Text.BlankToNothing(x)).ToArray)
        Loop
      End With
    End Using
  End Function

It depends on an extension method (Unique) to handle duplicate column names to be found as my answer in How to append unique numbers to a list of strings

And here's the BlankToNothing helper function:

  Public Function BlankToNothing(ByVal Value As String) As Object 
    If String.IsNullOrEmpty(Value) Then Return Nothing
    Return Value
  End Function
share|improve this answer

Here is a solution to handle inner commas in case you have the value: "Google, Inc" as a single value.

I have a method which get file path(string) and return DataTable.

private System.Data.DataTable ParsCSV(string filePath)
        {
StreamReader oStreamReader = new StreamReader(filePath);//reading the data from the File filePath=the pathe for the file
        string[] temp = oStreamReader.ReadToEnd().Split('\"');//assuming the first value will never be quatation ("), but if so we can always check with simple if
        //now we have an array which every 2nd value is what comes between the quoatations
        for (int i = 0; i < temp.Length; i++)//looping on every 2nd value in the array
        {
            if (i % 2 != 0)
            {
                temp[i]=temp[i].Replace(",", "");// replacing the comma with nothing - however we can replace it with unique character combination and restore it after we have all the data in the datatable object
            }
        }
        oStreamReader = new StreamReader(GenerateStreamFromString(string.Join("", temp))); // the StreamReader constrauctor can accept stream, so we will Join all back together without the neasty commas.
            //string.Join("", temp);
        //now the StreamReader is only have commas which seperate columns - no inner commas


    System.Data.DataTable oDataTable = null;
    int RowCount = 0;
    string[] ColumnNames = null;
    string[] oStreamDataValues = null;
    //using while loop read the stream data till end
    while (!oStreamReader.EndOfStream)
    {


        String oStreamRowData = oStreamReader.ReadLine().Trim();




        if (oStreamRowData.Length > 0)
        {

            oStreamDataValues = oStreamRowData.Split(',');
            //oStreamDataValues = oStreamRowData.Split(new string[] {";"}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
            //Bcoz the first row contains column names, we will poluate 
            //the column name by
            //reading the first row and RowCount-0 will be true only once
            if (RowCount == 0)
            {
                RowCount = 1;
                ColumnNames = oStreamRowData.Split(new string[] { "," }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
                oDataTable = new System.Data.DataTable();

                //using foreach looping through all the column names
                foreach (string csvcolumn in ColumnNames)
                {
                    DataColumn oDataColumn = new DataColumn(csvcolumn.ToUpper(), typeof(string));

                    //setting the default value of empty.string to newly created column
                    oDataColumn.DefaultValue = string.Empty;

                    //adding the newly created column to the table
                    oDataTable.Columns.Add(oDataColumn);
                }
            }
            else
            {
                //creates a new DataRow with the same schema as of the oDataTable            
                DataRow oDataRow = oDataTable.NewRow();

                //using foreach looping through all the column names
                for (int i = 0; i < ColumnNames.Length; i++)
                {
                    oDataRow[ColumnNames[i]] = oStreamDataValues[i] == null ? string.Empty : oStreamDataValues[i].ToString();
                    //for monitoring --mark when not debuging
                    // Response.Write(oDataRow[ColumnNames[i]].ToString());
                }

                //adding the newly created row with data to the oDataTable       
                oDataTable.Rows.Add(oDataRow);
            }
        }
    }
    //close the oStreamReader object
    oStreamReader.Close();
    //release all the resources used by the oStreamReader object
    oStreamReader.Dispose();

    //Top print, unmark it for testing
    //foreach (DataRow oDataRow in oDataTable.Rows)
    //{

    //    string RowValues = string.Empty;

    //    //Looping through all the columns in a row

    //    foreach (string csvcolumn in ColumnNames)
    //    {
    //        //concatenating the values for display purpose
    //        RowValues += csvcolumn + "=" + oDataRow[csvcolumn].ToString() + ";  ";
    //    }
    //    //Displaying the result on the console window
    //    Response.Write(RowValues);
    //}


    return oDataTable;


}

Here is the method which generate stream from string

public Stream GenerateStreamFromString(string s)
        {
            MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream();
            StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(stream);
            writer.Write(s);
            writer.Flush();
            stream.Position = 0;
            return stream;
        }
share|improve this answer
    
I would not recommend that anyone use this code for general purpose. I put it under test using the same tests I use for my parser (github.com/Core-Techs/Common/blob/master/Tests/Text/…;. Mainly it fails to handle jagged records and nested quotes but there are more problems. It may work fine for the author's unique scenario, but there are better options for general purpose use. I hope this is constructive criticism. –  Ronnie Overby Nov 23 at 14:50
    
Well, it helps in my specific problem were I know what type of file to expect, assuming the file have no inner quotations. I appreciate you response. The idea is to split it for the first time according to the wrapper character (") and then handling the inner delimiter characters. and then join it back together. –  Gil Allen 2 days ago
    
That reminds me of something else I forgot to point out: This approach is wasteful of memory. First the entire file contents are read and then copied it into a memory stream. So there's about 2x the file size in memory before even starting to write the data into the DataTable (and about 3x after). That may be perfectly fine for you're scenario, just not for general purpose where really big files are being consumed (but then again buffering into a DataTable probably isn't the best idea either in that case). –  Ronnie Overby 2 days ago

You need to parse the file line by line and pull out every column value.

CSV is tricky because you cannot just split the line on comma's. Some columns have comma's in the data like: "Overby, Ronnie".

share|improve this answer
2  
I'm not looking to write the code to do this. I'm sure it's been done before. I am currently look at this: codeproject.com/KB/database/CsvReader.aspx –  Ronnie Overby Jun 26 '09 at 16:53
    
And years later... I wrote one :) github.com/Core-Techs/Common/blob/master/CoreTechs.Common/Text/… –  Ronnie Overby Nov 23 at 14:50

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