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I have a dict of words. For each key in the dict, I want to find its frequency in an article.

After I open an article, I do

for k, v in sourted_key.items():
    for token in re.findall(k, data)
        token[form] += 1

in 're.findall(k, data)' key must be strings. But the keys in this dict are not. I want to search the keys. Any other solutions? Notice that the KEYS contain many PUNCTUATIONS.

e.g. if the key is 'hand.' it matches only hand. not handy, chandler.

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2  
Are you sure you want token[form] += 1? re.findall() returns a list() of matched strings, so token should be a string –  Mike Pennington May 8 '12 at 15:08
1  
what do you mean by "don't work here"? You get an error/invalid results? –  uhz May 8 '12 at 15:10
    
The question in unclear, e.g. given the text abac and keys ab, ba what exactly should it return? –  georg May 8 '12 at 15:37

7 Answers 7

In Python 2.7+ you could use collections.Counter for this:

import re, collections

text = '''Nullam euismod magna et ipsum tristique suscipit. Aliquam ipsum libero, cursus et rutrum ut, suscipit id enim. Maecenas vel justo dolor. Integer id purus ante. Aliquam volutpat iaculis consectetur. Suspendisse justo sapien, tincidunt ut consequat eget, fringilla id sapien. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Praesent mattis velit vitae libero luctus posuere. Vestibulum ac erat nibh, vel egestas enim. Ut ac eros ipsum, ut mattis justo. Praesent dignissim odio vitae nisl hendrerit sodales. In non felis leo, vehicula aliquam risus. Morbi condimentum nunc sit amet enim rutrum a gravida lacus pharetra. Ut eu nisi et magna hendrerit pharetra placerat vel turpis. Curabitur nec nunc et augue tristique semper.'''

c = collections.Counter(w.lower() for w in re.findall(r'\w+|[.,:;?!]', text))
words = set(('et', 'ipsum', ',', '?'))
for w in words:
  print('%s: %d' % (w, c.get(w, 0)))
share|improve this answer
    
The keys include something like proclaimation, stop, semicolon. I cannot just split the whole article. –  juju May 8 '12 at 15:17
    
@juju Why not exactly? If the keys include punctuation marks it wont matter if they are attached to words –  Hunter McMillen May 8 '12 at 15:24
    
@juju: I've updated the code to handle punctuation characters. –  NPE May 8 '12 at 15:37
    
@juju: Split the article then strip punctuation from ends of word. I've implemented that in my answer. –  Steven Rumbalski May 8 '12 at 15:41
    
@HunterMcMillen e.g If the keys contain '?.' and if the token in the article is 'where?' I want token['?'] increased by 1. Otherwise, since I don't have 'where?', token['?'] will not. –  juju May 8 '12 at 15:42
my_text = 'abc,abc,efr,sdgret,er,ttt,'

my_dict = {'abc':0, 'er': 0}

for word in my_text.split(','):
    if word in my_dict:
        my_dict[word] += 1

Result:

>>> my_dict
{'abc': 2, 'er': 1}

EDIT: More general solution

For normal article we need to use regex:

import re

my_string = "Wow! Is this true? Really!?!? This is crazy!"
my_dict = {'IS': 0, 'TRUE': 0}

words = re.findall(r'\w+', my_string)
cap_words = [word.upper() for word in words]

for word in cap_words:
    if word in my_dict:
        my_dict[word] += 1

Result:

>>> my_dict
{'IS': 2, 'TRUE': 1}
share|improve this answer
    
Obviously I have a 'normal' article, where words are splited by spaces and punctuations. –  juju May 8 '12 at 15:20
    
My solution is only a special case solution; I'll try to come up with a more general one. –  Akavall May 8 '12 at 15:24

I would do like that

tokens = {} 
d= {"a":1,"b":2}
data = "abca"
for k in d.keys():
    tokens[k] = data.count(k)
share|improve this answer
    
or simply tokens = {key:data.count(key) for key in d} –  georg May 8 '12 at 15:35
    
@thg435: Nice, but do note that count iterates over the entire string. This would perform badly if there were many keys or if the article were long or if there were many articles to review. –  Steven Rumbalski May 8 '12 at 15:55
    
@StevenRumbalski This is damn slow. Does it iterates over the entire string for each token? –  juju May 8 '12 at 17:06
    
@juju. Yes, it iterates over the entire string for each token. –  Steven Rumbalski May 8 '12 at 17:14

Try re.findall( re.escape( k ), data ) to make sure that special characters in the "words" don't cause problems.

But my guess is that this isn't your problem. The result of findall() is a list of matches, not strings. re.MatchObject doesn't define __getitem__ which means [form] won't work.

You probably meant counts[token.group()] += 1 where counts is a dictionary with default value 0.

share|improve this answer
    
re.findall returns a list of strings. –  Steven Rumbalski May 8 '12 at 15:25
    
Why link to a recipe for DefaultDict when there is a defaultdict in the collections module? And also a Counter class which is even more applicable. –  Steven Rumbalski May 8 '12 at 15:28
    
@StevenRumbalski: What if my pattern contains groups? As for the collections module: I know that it's way too long since I spent some quality time with Python :-( –  Aaron Digulla May 8 '12 at 15:30
    
From the docs: "Return all non-overlapping matches of pattern in string, as a list of strings. The string is scanned left-to-right, and matches are returned in the order found. If one or more groups are present in the pattern, return a list of groups; this will be a list of tuples if the pattern has more than one group." So yes, it's not always a list of strings. My bad. –  Steven Rumbalski May 8 '12 at 15:44

Option A

import re

text = """Now is the time for all good men to come to the aid of their country.  A man is only as good as all his thoughts."""
words = dict()

for word in re.findall('[^ .;]+', text):
    if words.get(word.lower(), False):
        words[word.lower()] += 1
    else:
        words[word.lower()] = 1

print words

This yields...

{'a': 1, 'all': 2, 'good': 2, 'for': 1, 'their': 1, 'of': 1, 
'is': 2, 'men': 1, 'as': 2, 'country': 1, 'to': 2, 'only': 1, 
'his': 1, 'time': 1, 'aid': 1, 'the': 2, 'now': 1, 'come': 1, 
'thoughts': 1, 'man': 1}

Option B: with a defaultdict

import re
from collections import defaultdict

text = """Now is the time for all good men to come to the aid of their country.  A man is only as good as all his thoughts."""
words = defaultdict(int)

for word in re.findall('[^ .;]+', text):
    words[word.lower()] += 1

print words

This results in...

defaultdict(<type 'int'>, {'a': 1, 'all': 2, 'good': 2, 'for': 1, 
'their': 1, 'of': 1, 'is': 2, 'men': 1, 'as': 2, 'country': 1, 'to': 2, 
'only': 1, 'his': 1, 'time': 1, 'aid': 1, 'the': 2, 'now': 1, 'come': 1, 
'thoughts': 1, 'man': 1})
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1  
If words were defined as defaultdict(int) the body of your for loop could be reduced to one line. Use collections.Counter to be even more concise: words = Counter(re.findall('[^ .;]+', text) –  Steven Rumbalski May 8 '12 at 15:32
    
@StevenRumbalski, collections.Counter is available in 2.7; however, I only have 2.6. Thank you for the defaultdict suggestion. –  Mike Pennington May 8 '12 at 15:41

Since everyone is taking a swing...

The difference with this one is the regex to separate the text from punctuation. I use \b\w+\b

import re 

article='''Richard II (13671400) was King of England, a member of the House of Plantagenet and the last of its main-line kings. He ruled from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. Richard was a son of Edward, the Black Prince, and was born during the reign of his grandfather, Edward III. Richard was tall, good-looking and intelligent. Although probably not insane, as earlier historians believed, he may have suffered from one or several personality disorders that may have become more apparent toward the end of his reign. Less of a warrior than either his father or grandfather, he sought to bring an end to the Hundred Years' War that Edward III had started. He was a firm believer in the royal prerogative, which led him to restrain the power of his nobility and rely on a private retinue for military protection instead. He also cultivated a courtly atmosphere where the king was an elevated figure, and art and culture were at the centre, in contrast to the fraternal, martial court of his grandfather. Richard's posthumous reputation has to a large extent been shaped by Shakespeare, whose play Richard II portrays Richard's misrule and Bolingbroke's deposition as responsible for the 15th-century Wars of the Roses. Most authorities agree that the way in which he carried his policies out was unacceptable to the political establishment, and this led to his downfall.'''
words = {}

for word in re.findall(r'\b\w+\b', article):
    word=word.lower()
    if word in words:
        words[word]+=1
    else:
        words[word]=1    

print [(k,v) for v, k in sorted(((v, k) for k, v in words.items()), reverse=True)] 

Prints out a list of tuples of (word, count) sorted by frequency:

[('the', 15), ('of', 11), ('was', 8), ('and', 8), ('to', 7), ('his', 7), ('he', 7), 
 ('a', 7), ('richard', 6), ('in', 4), ('that', 3), ('s', 3), ('grandfather', 3), 
 ('edward', 3), ('which', 2), ('reign', 2), ('or', 2), ('may', 2), ('led', 2), 
 ('king', 2), ('iii', 2), ('ii', 2), ('have', 2), ('from', 2), ('for', 2), ('end', 2), 
 ('as', 2), ('an', 2), ('years', 1), ('whose', 1), ('where', 1), ('were', 1), ('way', 1), ('wars', 1), ('warrior', 1), ('war', 1), ('until', 1), ('unacceptable', 1), ('toward', 1), ('this', 1), ('than', 1), ('tall', 1), ('suffered', 1), ('started', 1), ('sought', 1), ('son', 1), ('shaped', 1), ('shakespeare', 1), ('several', 1), ('ruled', 1), ('royal', 1), ('roses', 1), ('retinue', 1), ('restrain', 1), ('responsible', 1), ('reputation', 1), ('rely', 1), ('protection', 1), ('probably', 1), ('private', 1), ('prince', 1), ('prerogative', 1), ('power', 1), ('posthumous', 1), ('portrays', 1), ('political', 1), ('policies', 1), ('play', 1), ('plantagenet', 1), ('personality', 1), ('out', 1), ('one', 1), ('on', 1), ('not', 1), ('nobility', 1), ('most', 1), ('more', 1), ('misrule', 1), ('military', 1), ('member', 1), ('martial', 1), ('main', 1), ('looking', 1), ('line', 1), ('less', 1), ('last', 1), ('large', 1), ('kings', 1), ('its', 1), ('intelligent', 1), ('instead', 1), ('insane', 1), ('hundred', 1), ('house', 1), ('historians', 1), ('him', 1), ('has', 1), ('had', 1), ('good', 1), ('fraternal', 1), ('firm', 1), ('figure', 1), ('father', 1), ('extent', 1), ('establishment', 1), ('england', 1), ('elevated', 1), ('either', 1), ('earlier', 1), ('during', 1), ('downfall', 1), ('disorders', 1), ('deposition', 1), ('deposed', 1), ('culture', 1), ('cultivated', 1), ('courtly', 1), ('court', 1), ('contrast', 1), ('century', 1), ('centre', 1), ('carried', 1), ('by', 1), ('bring', 1), ('born', 1), ('bolingbroke', 1), ('black', 1), ('believer', 1), ('believed', 1), ('been', 1), ('become', 1), ('authorities', 1), ('atmosphere', 1), ('at', 1), ('art', 1), ('apparent', 1), ('although', 1), ('also', 1), ('agree', 1), ('15th', 1), ('1399', 1), ('1377', 1), ('13671400', 1)]
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article = "I have a dict of words. For each key in the dict, I want to find its frequency in an article"

words = {"dict", "i", "in", "key"} # set of words


wordsFreq = {}

wordsInArticle = tuple(word.lower() for word in atricle.split(" "))

for word in wordsInArticle:
  if word in wordsFreq:
    wordsFreq[word]= wordsFreq[word] + 1 if word in wordsFreq else 1
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