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I want to create a shape, which i would describe as "inverse circle":

CSS Shape

The image is somehow inaccurate, because the black line should continue along the outer border of the div element.

Here is a demo of what i have at the moment: http://jsfiddle.net/n9fTF/

Is that even possible with CSS without images?

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1  
My only thought was to use a box-shadow to simulate the curve, but it's severely imperfect since the border of div b doesn't follow the contour. jsfiddle.net/n9fTF/4 –  MetalFrog May 8 '12 at 15:22
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6 Answers 6

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Update: CSS3 Radial Background Gradient Option

(For those browsers supporting it--tested in FF and Chrome--IE10, Safari should work too).

One "problem" with my original answer is those situations where one does not have a solid background that they are working against. This update creates the same effect allowing for a transparent "gap" between the circle and it's inverse cutout.

See example fiddle.

CSS

.inversePair {
    border: 1px solid black;
    display: inline-block;    
    position: relative;    
    height: 100px;
    text-align: center;
    line-height: 100px;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

#a {
    width: 100px;
    border-radius: 50px;
    background: grey;
    z-index: 1;
}

#b {
    width: 200px;
    /* need to play with margin/padding adjustment
       based on your desired "gap" */
    padding-left: 30px;
    margin-left: -30px;
    /* real borders */
    border-left: none;
    -webkit-border-top-right-radius: 20px;
    -webkit-border-bottom-right-radius: 20px;
    -moz-border-radius-topright: 20px;
    -moz-border-radius-bottomright: 20px;
    border-top-right-radius: 20px;
    border-bottom-right-radius: 20px;
    /* the inverse circle "cut" */
    background-image: -moz-radial-gradient(
        -23px 50%, /* the -23px left position varies by your "gap" */
        circle closest-corner, /* keep radius to half height */
        transparent 0, /* transparent at center */
        transparent 55px, /*transparent at edge of gap */
        black 56px, /* start circle "border" */
        grey 57px /* end circle border and begin color of rest of background */
    );
    background-image: -webkit-radial-gradient(-23px 50%, circle closest-corner, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0) 0, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0) 55px, black 56px, grey 57px);
    background-image: -ms-radial-gradient(-23px 50%, circle closest-corner, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0) 0, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0) 55px, black 56px, grey 57px);
    background-image: -o-radial-gradient(-23px 50%, circle closest-corner, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0) 0, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0) 55px, black 56px, grey 57px);
    background-image: radial-gradient(-23px 50%, circle closest-corner, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0) 0, rgba(0, 0, 0, 0) 55px, black 56px, grey 57px);
}

Original Answer

Took more effort than I expected to get the z-indexing to work (this seems to ignore the negative z-index), however, this gives a nice clean look (tested in IE9, FF, Chrome):

HTML

<div id="a" class="inversePair">A</div>
<div id="b" class="inversePair">B</div>

CSS

.inversePair {
    border: 1px solid black;
    background: grey;
    display: inline-block;    
    position: relative;    
    height: 100px;
    text-align: center;
    line-height: 100px;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

#a {
    width: 100px;
    border-radius: 50px;
}

#a:before {
    content:' ';
    left: -6px;
    top: -6px;
    position: absolute;
    z-index: -1;
    width: 112px; /* 5px gap */
    height: 112px;
    border-radius: 56px;
    background-color: white;
} 

#b {
    width: 200px;
    z-index: -2;
    padding-left: 50px;
    margin-left: -55px;
    overflow: hidden;
    -webkit-border-top-right-radius: 20px;
    -webkit-border-bottom-right-radius: 20px;
    -moz-border-radius-topright: 20px;
    -moz-border-radius-bottomright: 20px;
    border-top-right-radius: 20px;
    border-bottom-right-radius: 20px;
}

#b:before {
    content:' ';
    left: -58px;
    top: -7px;
    position: absolute;
    width: 114px; /* 5px gap, 1px border */
    height: 114px;
    border-radius: 57px;
    background-color: black;
} 
share|improve this answer
    
this is great, i like this solution –  Alp May 8 '12 at 22:35
    
@Alp--great! Glad it met approval. –  ScottS May 8 '12 at 22:42
1  
@Alp--I added an update that would allow for a transparent gap between circle and inverse on browsers supporting radial gradient background. –  ScottS May 13 '12 at 9:17
    
awesome, this is real css mastery. almost wizardry :) –  Alp May 13 '12 at 10:32
    
Amazing - been looking for ages to find a way to get a small circle chopped out of a div and this is exactly the trick I needed –  Fijjit Oct 24 '13 at 21:03
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I can't really tell from your drawing how rounded you want the points, but here's one possibility: http://jsfiddle.net/n9fTF/6/

If the points need to be more rounded, you'll need to put some circles on the ends so they blend with the big scoop.

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best solution so far, thank you. nevertheless the "white gap" between both div elements should have exactly the same width everywhere, which is not the case here –  Alp May 8 '12 at 15:49
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Different approach : Box-shadows

This approach uses CSS box shadows which are supported by IE9+ (canIuse)

DEMO

Output :

CSS shape with inset curve using box-shadows

HTML :

<div id="a">
    <div id="b"></div>
</div>

CSS :

#a{
    overflow:hidden;
    border-radius:20px;
    position:relative;
    display:inline-block;
}
#a:before, #a:after{
    content:'';
    width: 100px;
    border-radius: 50%;
}
#a:before {
    height: 100px;
    float:left;    
    border: 1px solid black;
    background: grey;
}
#a:after {
    position:absolute;
    left:14px; top:-6px;
    height:114px;
    box-shadow: 1px 0px 0px 0px #000, 110px 0px 0px 68px #808080;
    background:none;
    z-index:-1;
}
#b {
    width: 200px;
    height: 100px;
    background:none;
    margin-left:-15px;
    border: 1px solid black;
    border-left:none;
    float:left;
    border-top-right-radius: 20px;
    border-bottom-right-radius: 20px;
}
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1  
That's beautiful, nicely done! –  David Thomas Jul 14 at 11:19
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This is a very interesting question. I've recently posted a tutorial on how to make Inverse Border Radius in CSS (here) and I think this could easily be adapted for your case.

The trick is to create a span that generates the inverse border using a very simple concept - very thick borders. And use the inside section by hiding them. What you would have to do in addition to my script provided is add another border-radius to the top-left corner as I am only using the top-right one. Make the span aligned to the left of the item you want by absolute positioning, and increase the height/width of span accordingly and voila you have your inverse border-radius.

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Someone else done it somewhere from what I found...

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/ajeN7/

and the question: CSS3 Inverted Rounded Corner

Hopefully that helps!

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this does not seem to work in chrome –  Alp May 8 '12 at 15:41
    
@alp Just remove the -moz- from border-radius and you should be okay. It's not quite the correct effect, though. –  MetalFrog May 8 '12 at 17:08
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Introduce an absolutely positioned borderless white circle which sits behind the gray circle at an offset. You will need to set the z-index of the dark circle to ensure that it sits above the white circle:

#c {
    position: absolute;
    border: 0;
    left: 30px;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    border-radius: 50px;
    background: white;
}

Demo.

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this is not optimal because of the missing black border –  Alp May 8 '12 at 15:48
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