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My question is about Linq to SQL Performance, I have an SQL string and convert it to Linq to sql:

SQL query:

SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), ClockIn, 103) AS ClockDate, MIN(ClockIn) AS ClockIn, MAX(ClockOut) AS ClockOut, SUM(DATEDIFF(MINUTE, ClockIn, ClockOut)) AS [TotalTime]
FROM TimeLog
WHERE (EmployeeId = 10)
GROUP BY CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), ClockIn, 103)
ORDER BY ClockIn DESC

LINQ query:

From u In objDC.TimeLogs
Where u.EmployeeId = 10
Group By Key = New With {u.ClockIn.Year, u.ClockIn.Month, u.ClockIn.Day} Into G = Group
Order By G.First.ClockIn Descending
Select New With {.ClockDate = Key.Day & "/" & Key.Month & "/" & Key.Year,
 .ClockIn = G.Min(Function(p) p.ClockIn),
 .ClockOut = G.Max(Function(p) p.ClockOut),
 .TotalTime = G.Sum(Function(p) SqlMethods.DateDiffMinute(p.ClockIn, p.ClockOut))}

The generated query string from the LINQ in SQL profiler was:

SELECT [t4].[value] AS [ClockDate], [t4].[value2] AS [ClockIn2], [t4].[value22] AS [ClockOut], [t4].[value3] AS [TotalTime]
 FROM (
 SELECT ((((CONVERT(NVarChar,[t3].[value32])) + '/') + (CONVERT(NVarChar,[t3].[value222]))) + '/') + (CONVERT(NVarChar,[t3].[value22])) AS [value], [t3].[value] AS [value2], [t3].[value2] AS [value22], [t3].[value3], [t3].[value22] AS [value222], [t3].[value222] AS [value2222], [t3].[value32]
 FROM (
 SELECT MIN([t2].[ClockIn]) AS [value], MAX([t2].[ClockOut]) AS [value2], SUM([t2].[value]) AS [value3], [t2].[value2] AS [value22], [t2].[value22] AS [value222], [t2].[value3] AS [value32]
 FROM (
 SELECT DATEDIFF(Minute, [t1].[ClockIn], [t1].[ClockOut]) AS [value], [t1].[EmployeeId], [t1].[value] AS [value2], [t1].[value2] AS [value22], [t1].[value3], [t1].[ClockIn], [t1].[ClockOut]
 FROM (
 SELECT DATEPART(Year, [t0].[ClockIn]) AS [value], DATEPART(Month, [t0].[ClockIn]) AS [value2], DATEPART(Day, [t0].[ClockIn]) AS [value3], [t0].[ClockIn], [t0].[ClockOut], [t0].[EmployeeId]
 FROM [dbo].[TimeLog] AS [t0]
 ) AS [t1]
 ) AS [t2]
 WHERE [t2].[EmployeeId] = 10
 GROUP BY [t2].[value2], [t2].[value22], [t2].[value3]
 ) AS [t3]
 ) AS [t4]
 ORDER BY (
 SELECT [t6].[ClockIn]
 FROM (
 SELECT TOP (1) [t5].[ClockIn]
 FROM [dbo].[TimeLog] AS [t5]
 WHERE ((([t4].[value222] IS NULL) AND (DATEPART(Year, [t5].[ClockIn]) IS NULL)) OR (([t4].[value222] IS NOT NULL) AND (DATEPART(Year, [t5].[ClockIn]) IS NOT NULL) AND ((([t4].[value222] IS NULL) AND (DATEPART(Year, [t5].[ClockIn]) IS NULL)) OR (([t4].[value222] IS NOT NULL) AND (DATEPART(Year, [t5].[ClockIn]) IS NOT NULL) AND ([t4].[value222] = DATEPART(Year, [t5].[ClockIn])))))) AND ((([t4].[value2222] IS NULL) AND (DATEPART(Month, [t5].[ClockIn]) IS NULL)) OR (([t4].[value2222] IS NOT NULL) AND (DATEPART(Month, [t5].[ClockIn]) IS NOT NULL) AND ((([t4].[value2222] IS NULL) AND (DATEPART(Month, [t5].[ClockIn]) IS NULL)) OR (([t4].[value2222] IS NOT NULL) AND (DATEPART(Month, [t5].[ClockIn]) IS NOT NULL) AND ([t4].[value2222] = DATEPART(Month, [t5].[ClockIn])))))) AND ((([t4].[value32] IS NULL) AND (DATEPART(Day, [t5].[ClockIn]) IS NULL)) OR (([t4].[value32] IS NOT NULL) AND (DATEPART(Day, [t5].[ClockIn]) IS NOT NULL) AND ((([t4].[value32] IS NULL) AND (DATEPART(Day, [t5].[ClockIn]) IS NULL)) OR (([t4].
 [value32] IS NOT NULL) AND (DATEPART(Day, [t5].[ClockIn]) IS NOT NULL) AND ([t4].[value32] = DATEPART(Day, [t5].[ClockIn])))))) AND ([t5].[EmployeeId] = 10)
 ) AS [t6]
 ) DESC

The LINQ to SQL was too slow, and the execution plan for the generated query compared with the SQL Query was 7% for the human written SQL query and 97% for the Linq generated query.

What's wrong with my Linq to SQL query? or is it a Linq performance and limitation?

share|improve this question
    
Welcome to the world of leaky abstractions. –  Robaticus May 8 '12 at 15:41
    
Compiled Query is available,Compiled Query can. –  Berat Bilgin May 8 '12 at 15:46
3  
With that much difference in performance, have you considered using a stored procedure for the query? How to: Use Stored Procedures to Return Rowsets (LINQ to SQL): msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb386975.aspx –  Andrew Morton May 8 '12 at 15:53
    
Thanks @BeratBilgin, no in such case compiled query can't, because I'm comparing the generated query vs written query not linq query vs sql query, compiled query does not affect the generated query. –  Sameh May 8 '12 at 15:54
    
Thanks @AndrewMorton, I can directly use the written query from datacontext, no need for stored procedure, but my question was about how Linq is useful and can be replacement of regular queries. seems no, you have to monitor the generated queries and replace Linq with String query sometime. –  Sameh May 8 '12 at 15:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think the problem is that you access the rows of each group in your OrderBy G.First statement and triggering a N+1 behavior in Linq-to-SQL, can you try something like:

var query = objDC.TimeLogs
            .Where(c => c.EmployeeId == 10)
            .GroupBy(c => c.ClockIn.Date)
            .OrderBy(g => g.Key)
            .Select(g => new
            {
                Date = g.Key,
                ClockIn = g.Min(c => c.ClockIn),
                ClockOut = g.Max(c => c.ClockOut),
            })
            .Select(g => new 
            {
                g.Date,
                g.ClockIn,
                g.ClockOut,
                TotalTime = g.ClockOut - g.ClockIn
            });
share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks Guillaume it solved the problem, I agree with you the problem was related to G.First, I changed my Linq query according to your answer. I will post the new linq query, I got the same result but the query was much faster, and the profiler gave me 55% for written query and 45% for the newly generated query, it was even faster from the original string query. Many thanks for your help. –  Sameh May 8 '12 at 17:29
    
no problem, glad I could help –  Guillaume86 May 8 '12 at 20:59

Again, this is the linq query based on Guillaume recommendation.

Many thanks Guillaume it solved the problem, I agree with you the problem was related to G.First.

I changed my Linq query according to your answer to:

From u In objDC.TimeLogs
Where u.EmployeeId = 10
Group By key = New With {u.ClockIn.Date} Into G = Group
Order By key.Date Descending
Select New With {
    .ClockDate = key.Date,
    .ClockIn = G.Min(Function(p) p.ClockIn),
    .ClockOut = G.Max(Function(p) p.ClockOut),
    .TotalTime = G.Sum(Function(p) SqlMethods.DateDiffMinute(p.ClockIn, p.ClockOut)) / 60}

I got the same result but the query was much faster, and the profiler gave me 55% for written query and 45% for the newly generated query, it was even faster from the original string query.

Many thanks for your help.

share|improve this answer

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