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I am trying to use .Net WebRequest to POST a form. The form contains fields that are XML. (Among other things) I have tried the following code:

WebRequest req = WebRequest.Create(ctx.SvcUrl);
req.Method = "POST";
req.ContentType = "application/x-www-form-urlencoded";
using (var writer = new StreamWriter(req.GetRequestStream(), System.Text.Encoding.ASCII))
{
    string reqBody = "first=<bill/>&last=smith"; //(embedded <>) - 500 Internal Server Error
    writer.Write(reqBody);
}
rsp = req.GetResponse();

var strm = rsp.GetResponseStream();
var rdr = new StreamReader(strm);
string input = rdr.ReadToEnd();

The <> in reqBody causes a 500 - Internal Server error.

What's the right way to encode this? Or are multi-part forms the answer??

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1  
Try &gt; and &lt; to replace the '<' and '>' characters in the string. Might do the trick? –  Jason Evans May 8 '12 at 16:10

3 Answers 3

Try using:

 string reqBody = string.Format("first={0}&last={1}", HttpUtility.HtmlEncode("<bill/>"), "smith");
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It works for all .NET versions. –  Coder May 8 '12 at 16:29
    
That won't work. It will encode the = and the &, which should remain unencoded. If you want to use this, you'll have to use: string reqBody = "first=" + HttpUtility.HtmlEncode("<bill/>") + "&last=" + HttpUtility.HtmlEncode("smith") –  Charlie Kilian May 8 '12 at 16:45
    
Note that you don't technically have to encode the string "smith" because it doesn't contain any special characters. But I still think it is a good idea to encode all values in the name-value pairs, in case the value changes later. –  Charlie Kilian May 8 '12 at 16:55
    
It seems HtmlEncoding has 2 problems, 1) the receiving side must decode -- this is not transparent, and 2) when "first=<bill>&last=smith" gets HtmlEncoded we have "first=&lt;bill&gt;&last=smith", which now has 3 '&' field separators -- the receiver won't parse this correctly. –  Chris May 8 '12 at 17:38
    
Try HttpUtility.UrlEncode() instead. If that works, I'll update my answer. –  Charlie Kilian May 8 '12 at 17:47

You need to encode the request. Use the HttpEncoder class.

using System.Web.Util;

WebRequest req = WebRequest.Create(ctx.SvcUrl);
req.Method = "POST";
req.ContentType = "application/x-www-form-urlencoded";
using (var writer = new StreamWriter(req.GetRequestStream(), 
    System.Text.Encoding.ASCII))
{
    var encoder = new HttpEncoder();
    string reqBody = String.Format("first={0}&last={1}",
        encoder.HtmlEncode("<bill/>"), 
        encoder.HtmlEncode("smith") ); 
    writer.Write(reqBody);
}
rsp = req.GetResponse();

var strm = rsp.GetResponseStream();
var rdr = new StreamReader(strm);
string input = rdr.ReadToEnd();

I used String.Format() because I thought it looked nicer and made it clearer what I was doing, but it isn't necessary. You can build the string through string concatenation, too, as long as you pass it through HttpEncoder.HtmlEncode() first.

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I guess HttpEncoder works for .NET 4.0 and above only. –  Coder May 8 '12 at 16:24
    
.Net 4.0 API works fine for me. However, HtmlEncode doesn't seem to be the solution. See my comment about the problem with &lt;, above. –  Chris May 8 '12 at 17:45

It turns out that UrlEncoding is being done automatically, so doing it myself can cause trouble. Also, the server I was connecting to couldn't handle any encoding. This muddied the water and made it difficult to see what was failing.

Bottom line solution was to get the server fixed to handle UrlEncoding.

As 'cheong00 on Microsoft's Forums' points out, to avoid the automatic, use TcpClient. But the encoding should be there.

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