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I have a row in a table that I do not want to be changed (ever).

Is it possible to set a MySQL row to READ-ONLY so that it cannot be updated in any way? If so, how?

If not, is it possible to set a permanent value in one of the columns of that row so that it cannot be changed? If so, how?

Thanks.

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3  
No, there's no such thing as a read-only row. But you can set up MySQL accounts such that a particular user does not have update/delete permissions. –  Marc B May 8 '12 at 16:10
    
Poss dup : stackoverflow.com/questions/3878672/… –  Kris.Mitchell May 8 '12 at 16:11
    
@Marc B: So neither of the options I mentioned are available? Please confirm, because the user-permissions solution you mentioned won't solve my problem unfortunately. –  ProgrammerGirl May 8 '12 at 16:12
2  
@Kris: Not a duplicate of that question at all. My question is entirely different. –  ProgrammerGirl May 8 '12 at 16:12
1  
@Rahul: I need to update the other rows in the table, so that's not an option. –  ProgrammerGirl May 8 '12 at 17:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You can create a BEFORE UPDATE trigger that raises an error if a "locked" record is about to be updated; since an error occurs before the operation is undertaken, MySQL ceases to proceed with it. If you also want to prevent the record from being deleted, you'd need to create a similar trigger BEFORE DELETE.

To determine whether a record is "locked", you could create a boolean locked column:

ALTER TABLE my_table ADD COLUMN locked BOOLEAN NOT NULL DEFAULT FALSE;

UPDATE my_table SET locked = TRUE WHERE ...;

DELIMITER ;;

CREATE TRIGGER foo_upd BEFORE UPDATE ON my_table FOR EACH ROW
IF OLD.locked THEN
  SIGNAL SQLSTATE '45000' SET MESSAGE_TEXT = 'Cannot update locked record';
END IF;;

CREATE TRIGGER foo_del BEFORE DELETE ON my_table FOR EACH ROW
IF OLD.locked THEN
  SIGNAL SQLSTATE '45000' SET MESSAGE_TEXT = 'Cannot delete locked record';
END IF;;

DELIMITER ;

Note that SIGNAL was introduced in MySQL 5.5. In earlier versions, you must perform some erroneous action that causes MySQL to raise an error: I often call an non-existent procedure, e.g. with CALL raise_error;


I cannot create an additional column on this table, but the row has a unique id in one of the columns, so how would I do this for that scenario?

In this case, you could do without the locked column and instead hard-code the test into your trigger; for example, to "lock" the record with id_column = 1234:

DELIMITER ;;

CREATE TRIGGER foo_upd BEFORE UPDATE ON my_table FOR EACH ROW
IF OLD.id_column <=> 1234 THEN
  SIGNAL SQLSTATE '45000' SET MESSAGE_TEXT = 'Cannot update locked record';
END IF;;

CREATE TRIGGER foo_del BEFORE DELETE ON my_table FOR EACH ROW
IF OLD.id_column <=> 1234 THEN
  SIGNAL SQLSTATE '45000' SET MESSAGE_TEXT = 'Cannot delete locked record';
END IF;;

DELIMITER ;
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Thanks for a very interesting solution. I cannot create an additional column on this table, but the row has a unique id in one of the columns, so how would I do this for that scenario? –  ProgrammerGirl May 8 '12 at 17:08
    
@Programmer: Just test on that id in the IF statement of the trigger: IF OLD.column <=> 'unique_id' THEN .... –  eggyal May 8 '12 at 17:09
2  
Now there's an unorthodox solution. I like it. +1 keep in mind though that you can only have one trigger (per event per table) in mysql so if you already have or need one another trigger in the future... you'd have to combine them into one. –  Kris May 8 '12 at 17:11
    
@eggyal: OK. Three questions: 1) What is "<=>"? 2) What is "OLD."? 3) What is "DELIMITER;;" ? Thanks again! –  ProgrammerGirl May 8 '12 at 17:31
2  
@Programmer: <=> is the NULL-safe equality comparison operator; OLD and NEW are keywords available in triggers which provide access to the affected record's values before/after the operation - see Trigger Syntax; DELIMITER specifies a new statement delimiter in order that commands which themselves contain the usual ; delimiter are treated as a single statement - you can choose character sequences other than ;; if you prefer. –  eggyal May 8 '12 at 17:35

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