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I have a schema "control" having a field named "tag" (text type) . Now I have created a component with this schema and fill the "tag" field as :

<RegForm:MyRegisteration runat="server" />

and updated web config file.

<add src="~/WebUserControl.ascx" tagName="MyRegisteration" tagPrefix="RegForm" />

I have added the Component to the Page.

Now I want to know is this the way to render the controls or any other better approach to do so.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

As I mentioned in some other posts, Tridion doesn't really care about what you're outputting. If your template writes the code that your ASP.NET or Java application needs to run, then it will run.

I wonder if you need to have this has a component, do you expect editors to create the control as part of their content? Do you need to translate it?

Normally this type of "content" goes in the template, not in the components.

The important thing to keep in mind is always: what will be written to the application server?

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Actually I have sometimes seen and created the so called "Code Components" based on a simple schema with only one multiline textfield and only usable by the System Administrators or Developers. In this component you could write code or references to Usercontrols. I admit it is not pretty, and potentially dangerous, but I do see those constructions around as well –  Hendrik Beenker May 8 '12 at 20:15

I have used the "Code Component" approach for publishing .net pages on a client site that did not have any version control code management software.

The components were used to store the current working version from the dev server.

To use this approch you must make sure that only developers have access rights to these components.

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