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Apparently, I'm not understanding how to use the ContinueWith method. My goal is to execute a task, and when complete, return a message.

Here's my code:

    public string UploadFile()
    {
        if (Request.Content.IsMimeMultipartContent())
        {
            //Save file
            MultipartFormDataStreamProvider provider = new MultipartFormDataStreamProvider(HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath("~/Files"));
            Task<IEnumerable<HttpContent>> task = Request.Content.ReadAsMultipartAsync(provider);

            string filename = "Not set";

            task.ContinueWith(o =>
            {
                //File name
                filename = provider.BodyPartFileNames.First().Value;
            }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext()); 

            return filename;
        }
        else
        {
            return "Invalid.";
        }
    }

The variable "filename" always returns "Not set". It seems the code within the ContinueWith method is never called. (It does get called if I debug through it line by line in VS.)

This method is being called in my ASP.NET Web API controller / Ajax POST.

What am I doing wrong here?

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2  
it's because you are doing an async operation. –  Daniel A. White May 8 '12 at 16:16
    
also, apart from the tasks being async, I think they are not even started. –  w0lf May 8 '12 at 16:22
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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you're using an asynchronous operation, the best approach would be to make your operation asynchronous as well, otherwise you'll lose on the advantages of the async call you're making. Try rewriting your method as follows:

public Task<string> UploadFile()
{
    if (Request.Content.IsMimeMultipartContent())
    {
        //Save file
        MultipartFormDataStreamProvider provider = new MultipartFormDataStreamProvider(HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath("~/Files"));
        Task<IEnumerable<HttpContent>> task = Request.Content.ReadAsMultipartAsync(provider);

        return task.ContinueWith<string>(contents =>
        {
            return provider.BodyPartFileNames.First().Value;
        }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext()); 
    }
    else
    {
        // For returning non-async stuff, use a TaskCompletionSource to avoid thread switches
        TaskCompletionSource<string> tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<string>();
        tcs.SetResult("Invalid.");
        return tcs.Task;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, thank you! This worked for me. Thanks to everyone else too - appreciate all your help. –  Rivka May 8 '12 at 22:16
    
I have a question about the TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext - my understanding is that's really a UI method (synching with the UI thread), but I am wondering whether there are any reasons that might be used within a webapi method. Are there any? –  AlexGad May 9 '12 at 5:05
    
The synchronization context can also be used to store some thread-local variables, and make sure they're repopulated when the control returns to the continuation. An example would be the Thread.CurrentPrincipal. If I remember correctly, the ASP.NET runtime defines a synchronization context for that case as well. –  carlosfigueira May 9 '12 at 13:47
    
If you are using .Net 4.0 - see this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/15201255/… –  Daniel Leiszen Apr 18 at 10:40
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The reasons for your variable not being set are:

  • the tasks are instantiated, but not run.
  • even if the tasks ran, the function would probably return before they finished running so, it would still return "Not set". The fix for this is waiting for the final task (the one setting fileName) to finish.

Your code could be fixed like this:

public string UploadFile()
{
    if (Request.Content.IsMimeMultipartContent())
    {
        //Save file
        MultipartFormDataStreamProvider provider = new MultipartFormDataStreamProvider(HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath("~/Files"));
        Task<IEnumerable<HttpContent>> task = Request.Content.ReadAsMultipartAsync(provider);

        string filename = "Not set";

        var finalTask = task.ContinueWith(o =>
            {
                //File name
                filename = provider.BodyPartFileNames.First().Value;
            }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext()); 

        task.Start();

        finalTask.Wait();

        return filename;
    }
    else
    {
        return "Invalid.";
    }
}

The additions are the following:

  • assigned the return value of task.ContinueWith to a variable called finalTask. We need this task, because we'll wait for it to finish
  • started the task (the task.Start(); line)
  • waited for the final task to finish before returning (finalTask.Wait();)

If possible, please consider not implementing this asynchronously, because in the end it's synchronous (you're waiting for it to finish) and the current implementation adds complexity that could probably be avoided.

Consider doing something along these lines (if possible):

public string UploadFile()
{
    if (Request.Content.IsMimeMultipartContent())
    {
        //Save file
        MultipartFormDataStreamProvider provider = new MultipartFormDataStreamProvider(HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath("~/Files"));

        Request.Content.ReadAsMultipart(provider); // don't know if this is really valid.

        return provider.BodyPartFileNames.First().Value;
    }
    else
    {
        return "Invalid.";
    }
}

Disclaimer: I have not actually executed the above code; I just wrote it to illustrate what should be done.

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2  
You should not be calling Wait() as it will result in blocking the thread. Instead this UploadFile() function itself should be asynchronous. –  marcind May 8 '12 at 17:14
    
I tried your first suggestion, but got an error on the start method: Start may not be called on a task with null action. Regarding non-asynchronously - I'm not sure. I don't think there's such a method called ReadAsMultipart (AFAIK). –  Rivka May 8 '12 at 17:38
    
@marcind You are right, it's an awkward construct. This is why I suggested the synchronous alternative, if possible. That's because we have two tasks executed sequentially and we need control back when they are finished - I think there's nothing asynchronous here. –  w0lf May 8 '12 at 19:29
    
@Rivka yes, I didn't say it works, I just suggested that you try to find a simpler alternative. Asynchronous code is not needed and only adds complexity in this case. –  w0lf May 8 '12 at 19:32
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You should return the type Task<T> from the method, in this case it would be a Task<string>.

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I tried this, but I having the same issue - the "filename" isn't being set. –  Rivka May 8 '12 at 17:49
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You are using an asynch operation. If you want to wait for its completion, you have to use the Wait method otherwise of your task:

task.ContinueWith(o =>
        {
            //File name
            filename = provider.BodyPartFileNames.First().Value;
        ).Wait();

return filename;

Edit: Some asynch methods start the task as soon as it is created, whereas other ask you to explicitly start them. You have to consult the documentation for each to be sure. In this case, it appears the task does start automatically.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried this. It doesn't seem to return anything (not even "Not Set") using Wait(). –  Rivka May 8 '12 at 17:58
    
Then it means the tasks are not run when they are created. I edited my answer accordingly. –  Falanwe May 8 '12 at 19:07
    
Get the error Start may not be called on a task with null action. The status of task was "RanToCompletion". –  Rivka May 8 '12 at 19:19
    
It means the task was already started (and completed...). The continuation should begin right away. If it does not, maybe the used scheduler cannot schedule the continuation. I would try removing the scheduler from the ContinueWith call. –  Falanwe May 8 '12 at 19:27
    
Wait will block the thread in this case and hence the continuation will not execute. –  Daniel Leiszen Apr 18 at 9:57
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