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I'm working on a server that returns character separated lists to its' client. In order to build these lists I have to detect the first iteration through a for-each loop:

    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder() ;
    boolean firstIterationFlag = true ;

    for ( String s : list ){
        if ( firstIterationFlag) {
            firstIterationFlag = false ;
        } else {
            builder.append(separator);
        }
        builder.append(s) ;         
   }
   return builder.toString() ;

Is there a way of doing this without the flag?

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Why do you have to detect the first iteration of the loop? –  BeRecursive May 8 '12 at 16:26
    
instead of a forEach loop, you could manually do a normal for loop, starting with index 1 instead of 0. –  Sheriff May 8 '12 at 16:26
1  
Have a look at this SO question: stackoverflow.com/questions/63150/… - it may be a better solution that yours. –  Aleks G May 8 '12 at 16:27
    
...or user list.indexOf(s) to get index... –  vilo May 8 '12 at 16:27
1  
@vilo: that is potentially a linear-time hit to each iteration, so a O(n^2) hit to the routine just to glue some text together. –  andersoj May 8 '12 at 16:29

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One simpler way for this situation is to note that you can always append an empty string:

// For the first iteration, use a no-op separator
String currentSeparator = "";
for (String s : list) {
    builder.append(currentSeparator);
    builder.append(s);
    // From the second iteration onwards, use this
    currentSeparator = separator;
}

Alternatively (and preferrably) use Guava's Joiner class to start with :)

This "joiner" scenario is almost always the one given for this requirement - so just use Joiner. For other scenarios, either use a regular for loop or use the condition as per your code.

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1  
+1 for Joiner, -1 for currentSeparator = +0 :-) –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 8 '12 at 16:28
1  
The if eliminated, but more difficult to grasp –  CodeChords man May 8 '12 at 16:29
1  
+1 for currentSeparator ;) –  Peter Lawrey May 8 '12 at 17:09
    
I use StringUtils.join from Apache commons-lang. –  Ravi Wallau May 8 '12 at 18:01
    
@raviWallau so did I, before I knew Guava's Joiner :-) –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 8 '12 at 18:05

Not using foreach, but by using the iterator manually:

Iterator<String> it = list.iterator();
if(it.hasNext()){
    doSomeThingForTheFirstTime(it.next());
    while(it.hasNext()){
        doSomethingElse(it.next);
    }
}

(btw, this is pretty much what Guava's Joiner class does internally, though on a higher level)

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In the specific case you cite, use Guava's Joiner instead of rolling your own...

An object which joins pieces of text (specified as an array, Iterable, varargs or even a Map) with a separator. It either appends the results to an Appendable or returns them as a String. Example:

Joiner joiner = Joiner.on(separator).skipNulls();
return joiner.join(list);
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1  
+1 (Guava's Joiner is far superior to anything in apache commons) –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 8 '12 at 16:31

Just for the fun here is a different option.

    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    for (String s : list) {
        builder.append(separator);
        builder.append(s);
    }
    builder.deleteCharAt(0);
    return builder.toString();
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I would use commons.lang StringUtils.join function (see http://commons.apache.org/lang/api-2.4/org/apache/commons/lang/StringUtils.html). I strongly recommend that you get acquainted with this and other helper libraries to avoid re-inventing the wheel.

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You could also use the following method:

public static String toString(List<?> list, String separator) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    Iterator<?> it = list.iterator();
    while (it.hasNext()) {
        Object next = it.next();
        sb.append(next);
        if (it.hasNext()) {
            sb.append(separator);
        }
    }
    return sb.toString();
}

The enhanced for statement is equivalent to a basic for statement of the form:

for (I #i = Expression.iterator(); #i.hasNext(); ) {
    VariableModifiersopt TargetType Identifier =
        (TargetType) #i.next();
    Statement
}

#i is an automatically generated identifier

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Well, this will not detect the first iteration in the loop, but solve the problem. Just append the seperator at the end of each string and cut off the last seperator.

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder() ;

for ( String s : list ) {
    builder.append(s) ;         
    builder.append(separator);
}
builder.setLength(builder.length() - separator.length());
return builder.toString() ;
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