Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have studied (and I keep studying) C++ language (I read Accelerated c++ and cplusplus.com tutorial) but now I'm tired to use it to make console applications. All the examples I have read so far explain how to make console applications.

Following a step by step tutorial online I made a web browser (in C++ under Visual Studio 2010). That was a funny experience but I prefer to know why for example I have to click that option in VS instead of follow a video with no explanation at all.

So I'd like to know which kind of book should I buy to learn how to develop similar and other applications of any kind in c++ (being a versatile language) with visual studio 2010 (I don't want to study other languages at the moment)

Any suggestions pls?

Sincerely yours

Fabio

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by AJ., Joe, Steve, Bo Persson, John Dibling May 9 '12 at 4:46

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Careful, you probably developed a browser in C++/CLI (C++ with extensions to integrate it in CLI/.NET Framework), which is not what usually people call C++. –  Matteo Italia May 8 '12 at 16:50
1  
Obligatory comment: Definitive C++ Book List –  AJG85 May 8 '12 at 16:51
    
You also didn't make a web browser. You took an existing browser component, and put it in your own window. :) –  jalf May 8 '12 at 16:51

2 Answers 2

Take a step back. Those tutorials, examples and text books did not teach you how to write console applications.

They taught you how to program C++.

The console applications were just convenient shells, something to put your C++ code in to allow it to compiler and run as easily as possible.

The point you need to learn is that it doesn't matter what type of program your code is running in. C++ is C++ is C++. Whether it runs in a console application, a graphical GUI application, or perhaps some full-screen 3d-rendered thing (such as a game), C++ is exactly the same.

All the (good) guides and tutorials just use the simplest possible wrapper, so that they can easily focus on what matters.

Following a step by step tutorial online I made a web browser (in C++ under Visual Studio 2010). That was a funny experience but I prefer to know why for example I have to click that option in VS instead of follow a video with no explanation at all.

That is the choice you made. You chose that you didn't want to write the actual code for your program, but instead wanted something that looked flashy. And that is what your tutorial showed you: how to glue together a few ready-made parts, to create something that looks cool.

But it didn't explain anything, because there's nothing to explain.

But all this fluff is ultimately just libraries. Whether your C++ code calls a library function which puts a character on the screen in the console, or renders a teapot on a Direct3D surface, or gives a textbox focus, it's just calling library code written by someone else. There's nothing to explain, other than "go read the documentation for the library in question, it explains how to use it".

If you want to learn how to use C++, you need a good C++ textbook. Good C++ textbooks generally use console applications as their examples, to avoid bogging you down in irrelevant details. Of course, the skills learned from these can be applied to all sorts of other applications as well.

In any case, it just so happens that SO has what is probably the best list of C++ textbooks on the entire internet: go check it out

share|improve this answer

Following a step by step tutorial online I made a web browser (in C++ under Visual Studio 2010). That was a funny experience but I prefer to know why for example I have to click that option in VS instead of follow a video with no explanation at all.

You didn't "make" a web browser. You used existing browser component - written by somebody else.

All the examples I have read so far explain how to make console applications.

Everything you learn by writing "console" application is applicable to "non-console" applications as well.

Any suggestions pls?

If you want to write "non-console" GUI applications, you need to study some GUI toolkit (will take time). I'd advise to study Qt 4, because with this toolkit you won't be permanently locked into windows platform. To study Qt 4, go to doc.qt.nokia.com and start reading (tutorials, "how to learn", "features", etc).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your comments. I guess Qt 4 could be my winning card. Do you guys think is a valid and better option compared to Visual Studio 2010 if I write my apps only in c++? Can you make iphone apps and simple games with qt4? (I mean without SDL or OpenGl - I will study SDL soon)What are the pros/cons between qt4 and vs2010? Sorry if I made too many questions, just feel free to answers the ones you like –  Fabio Moro May 8 '12 at 23:22

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.