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I've got a semi-complex inheritance structure that I'm having difficulty with on overriding a constructor on a base class. The following code can show the error:

public abstract class MyBaseObject
{
    public MyBaseObject(MyBaseCollection<MyBaseObject> parent)
    {
        this.Parent = parent;
    }

    public MyBaseCollection<MyBaseObject> Parent { get; set; }
}

public abstract class MyBaseCollection<T>
    where T : MyBaseObject
{ }

public class MyRealObject : MyBaseObject
{
    public MyRealObject(MyRealCollection parent)
        : base(parent)
    { }

    public new MyRealCollection Parent { get { return (MyRealCollection)base.Parent; } }
}

public class MyRealCollection : MyBaseCollection<MyRealObject>
{ }

So, specifically, I can't override the constructor in the MyBaseObject class. Trying to pass in MyRealCollection in place of MyBaseCollection isn't acceptable. If I get rid of the generics arguments, it works; MyRealCollection is accepted in place of MyBaseCollection. But I really need the generics argument to make my collection classes work the way I need them to.

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If you are using C#4 You may want to take a look this question and answer. May not be a direct answer to your problem, but might help if you decide to refactor your code slightly: stackoverflow.com/q/9203352/250725 –  psubsee2003 May 8 '12 at 17:26
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I suggest you look into contravariance and covariance. Here might be a good start http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd799517.aspx

In short, the CLR can't assume what you want it to assume with respect to the type inheritance for some very well-defined reasons that are way above my pay grade.

However, you can do something like this if you play with the type hierarchy a little. I used IEnumerable to help.

public abstract class MyBaseObject
{
    public MyBaseObject(IEnumerable<MyBaseObject> parent)
    {
        this.Parent = parent;
    }

    public IEnumerable<MyBaseObject> Parent { get; set; }
}

public class MyRealObject : MyBaseObject
{ 
    public MyRealObject(MyRealCollection parent)
        : base(parent)
    { }

    public new MyRealCollection Parent { get { return (MyRealCollection)base.Parent; } }
}

public class MyRealCollection : IEnumerable<MyRealObject>
{ }
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2  
+1. Specifically you can do this with IEnumerable<T> because T is defined as an out type parameter- it is only ever used as the output of an operation on the interface, and therefore can't be meddled with by outside forces (as in my answer's example) –  Chris Shain May 8 '12 at 17:16
    
@Chris +1, thanks for the clarification. –  Squirrelsama May 8 '12 at 17:26
1  
The key to this was to use the interfaces (which my actual project is using, I'd just simplified it for this example), and then declare the T generics on the collection as out. –  Random May 8 '12 at 17:35
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MyRealCollection is not accepted in the place of MyBaseCollection because it is a collection of MyRealObject, not MyBaseObject. For an idea of why, imagine if the constructor for MyBaseObject did this:

public MyBaseObject(MyBaseCollection<MyBaseObject> parent)
{
    this.Parent = parent;
    parent.Add(new SomeOtherRealObject());
}

That would be perfectly legal from the perspective of MyBaseObject, but not if you had passed in an instance of MyRealCollection

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