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I created an abstract class A that implements methods that are commonly used. Now I realized that a new class has to use the same methods but with different attribute values. Below is a quick summary:

public abstract class A implement IUtils {
  protected final String LOGIN_XPATH = "xpathA";

  public String getLoginName() {
    return getXpath(LOGIN_XPATH);
  }
}

public class B extends A {
  private final String LOGIN_XPATH = "xpathB";
}

Calling B.getXpath() will result in the super method being called, thus using "xpathA". I would want it to use "xpathB". I thought about using the following composition in class A:

public abstract class A implement IUtils {
  protected IXpaths xpaths = null;

  public A() {
    xpaths = new XPathsClass();
  }  

  public String getLoginName() {
    return getXpath(xpaths.getXpath(StaticString.LOGIN_XPATH));
  }
}

public class StaticString {
  public final String LOGIN_XPATH = "LOGIN_XPATH";
}

public class XPathsClass implements IXpaths {
  private static final Map<String, String> conversionMap = new HashMap<String, String>();

  static {
    conversionMap.put(StaticString.LOGIN_XPATH, "xpathA");
  }

  public String getValue(String query) {
    return conversionMap.get(query);
  }
}

public class XPathsClassB implements IXpaths {
  private static final Map<String, String> conversionMap = new HashMap<String, String>();

  static {
    conversionMap.put(StaticString.LOGIN_XPATH, "xpathB");
  }

  public String getValue(String query) {
    return conversionMap.get(query);
  }
}

public class B extends A {
  public B() {
    super();
    xpaths = new XPathsClassB();
  }
}

This seems to work but it makes it very long and way more difficult to read. What would be a better way?

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Well, did you try removing the final keyword? –  Second Rikudo May 8 '12 at 17:22

2 Answers 2

Yeah, I don't really like the way statics work across sub-classes in Java. We had an argument ... I mean discussion ... about this on another post here on SO somewhere.

But anyway, I think the cleanest solution is:

public abstract class A implement IUtils { 
  public String getXpathValue() {
    return "xpathA";
  }

  public String getLoginName() { 
   return getXpath(getXpathValue()); 
  } 
} 

public class B extends A { 
  public String getXpathValue() {
    return "xpathB";
  }
} 

If every subclass should have its own Xpath value, then make the getXpath function in A abstract. Then if you forget to implement it in a subclass you'll get a compile-time error.

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You really have 2 choices:

  1. Have a variable in your base class, and add a protected setter method so that subclasses can set it to a new value
  2. Have no variable at all, and override the method in each subclass so that it returns the right String.

I recommend solution 2 - solve by overriding the method

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