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How can I check the index of a char within a string?

var str = 'alabama';
alert(str.indexOf('a'));

The "indexOf" method seems to work only at the first occurrence of the char. Any ideas?

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What are you trying to do? Find all occurrences of 'a'? Count how many 'a's? –  Zero21xxx May 8 '12 at 17:17
    
I´m trying to get the indexes of the 'a's. In fact, I need to learn the process so I can use it to identify the position of the char and wrap it with a div. –  darksoulsong May 8 '12 at 17:46
    
If you have to wrap it with a div why don't you use str.replace(/a/g, "<div>a</div>"); ? –  user1150525 May 8 '12 at 17:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can write your own function:

function charIndexes(string, char) {
    var i, j, indexes = []; for(i=0,j=string.length;i<j;++i) {
        if(string.charAt(i) === char) {
            indexes.push(i);
        }
    }

    return indexes;
}
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var str = 'alabama',i=0, ci=[];

while((i=str.indexOf('a',i))!=-1)  ci.push(i++);

alert(ci.join(', '));
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To find subsequent occurrences, you need to supply the second parameter to .indexOf, repeatedly starting from one higher than the last occurrence found.

String.prototype.allIndexesOf = function(c, n) {
    var indexes = [];
    n = n || 0;
    while ((n = this.indexOf(c, n)) >= 0) {
        indexes.push(n++);
    }
    return indexes;
}

Test:

> "alabama".allIndexesOf("a")
[0, 2, 4, 6]

EDIT function updated to allow specification of a fromIndex, per String.indexOf.

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution looks cleaner, but mine is faster :) jsperf.com/indexofso –  user1150525 May 8 '12 at 17:30
    
yeah, there's a bad performance overhead adding to the prototype of built-in types in Chrome - jsperf.com/indexofso/2 –  Alnitak May 8 '12 at 17:40
    
Note also that this version preserves the semantics of String.indexOf() - the search string doesn't have to be a single character. –  Alnitak May 8 '12 at 17:41
    
that's true, but the question was just about chars. So charAt will be ok, too. –  user1150525 May 8 '12 at 17:44
    
Thx, this will do just fine. o/ But I´ll use Bennika´s because I felt a little slowdown in the page using yours (I´m doing this search in a blog post. So its a really huge string). –  darksoulsong May 8 '12 at 21:31

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