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Alright, so we know functions in the STL like

std::fill(boolContainer.begin(), boolContainer.end(), false);

I'm working on a class with a method which also works on a container, and I've realized that I just as well might template it like in the example above The non-templated version is like this:

class SomeClass {
public:
    // ...
    int containerMethod(std::vector<int> &v);
    // ...  
private:
    // ...
};

And I'm aiming to change it into:

class SomeClass {
public:
    // ...
    template <class InputIterator>
    int containerMethod(const InputIterator &begin, const InputIterator &end);
    // ...  
private:
    // ...
};

However I'm having trouble working out the details for the implementation:

template <class Iter> int SomeClass::containerMethod
(const Iter &begin, const Iter&end) {
    // Here I need to instantiate an iterator for the container.
    Iter iter;
    for (iter = begin; iter != end; ++iter) {
        // This does not seem to work.
    }
    return 0;
}

So the question is how does one correctly instantiate a templated iterator, based on the templated parameters of a method? Note that I only need an input iterator.

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2  
How it doesn't work? Compiler error, crash, something else? –  jrok May 8 '12 at 17:32
    
Works for me. –  Robᵩ May 8 '12 at 17:36
3  
It is also common in the standard library to pass iterators by value since they are usually very lightweight objects and you often need a copy of them anyways (as you do in this example with begin). –  David Brown May 8 '12 at 17:42
    
We seem to get this question every 2-3 days, if I had a pound for every time this pops up.... –  EdChum May 8 '12 at 17:52
    
@DavidBrown you're right, good insight. –  rwols May 8 '12 at 17:55
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your test case is incomplete, so I have to consult my crystal ball.

You have placed your template definition in a source code file, when it should have been in a header file.

See: Why can templates only be implemented in the header file?

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Well, now I feel stupid... That was actually the problem. Thanks. –  rwols May 8 '12 at 17:53
    
Where can I find a crystal ball like yours? It's been extremely accurate lately. –  chris May 8 '12 at 18:06
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