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I have two tables where I'm trying to select rows where a common field between those tables matches exactly, however it's proving difficult to write the query. Here is a simplified version:

The tables look like this (simplified):

T1:
  id, name, sn

T2:
  id, location, sn

I'm trying to get t1.name and t2.loc together only where t1.sn=t2.sn. The sn field is unique in both, and so at the most, only 1 record will match between tables. In t1, all records have a sn field value, however in t2 about 30% of them have NULL for sn. So, I an expecting the join to produce somewhat fewer rows than t1 has.

How would I do the join?

Thanks.

Sample data:

t1:
+---+--------+-------+-----+
| id| name   | sn    | ... |
+---+--------+-------+-----+
| 1 | thing1 | 12345 |     |
| 2 | thing2 | 10000 |     |
| 3 | thing3 | 33445 |     |
| 4 | thing4 | 99223 |     |
+---+--------+-------+-----+

T2:
+----+--------+-------+-----+
| id | loc    | sn    | ... |
+----+--------+-------+-----+
| 90 | here   | 12345 |     |
| 92 | there  | NULL  |     |
| 96 | near   | 33445 |     |
| 99 | far    | 99223 |     |
+----+--------+-------+-----+

Result:
+--------+-------+-------+
| name   | loc   | sn    |
+--------+-------+-------+
| thing1 | here  | 12345 |
| thing3 | near  | 33445 |
| thing4 | far   | 99223 |
+--------+-------+-------+
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1  
What have you tried? –  eggyal May 8 '12 at 17:56
    
In this example above, something akin to: "select name, loc, t1.sn from t1 join t2 on t1.sn=t2.sn". The thinking being the query would return rows where the sn values matched. My actual DB has 30k rows in it, and when I set it running and wait, the results table has about 400k rows before I finally kill off the query. –  MikeC May 8 '12 at 17:57
    
try this to verify your unicity of t2.sn: select t1.id, count(1) as nb from t1 inner join t2 on (t1.sn=t2.sn) group by t1.id having nb>1 –  Keil May 8 '12 at 18:06
    
@MikeC: But are the 400k results you're obtaining incorrect? Is your question really about how to improve the performance of that query (to which my first answer would be ensure that you have indexes in both tables on their respective sn columns)? –  eggyal May 8 '12 at 18:21
    
@Keil: when I run this on the production DB, I end up with this: id: 51, nb: 1403, id: 360, nb: 1403, id: 477, nb: 1403... So something does not seem right. :/ –  MikeC May 8 '12 at 18:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
SELECT
  t1.name AS name,
  t2.loc AS loc,
  t1.sn AS sn
FROM t1
INNER JOIN t2 ON t1.sn=t2.sn
share|improve this answer
    
@which makes it clear, that the structure of your production DB and the structure of the sample are different: a query with only INNER JOINs can never give more records, than the smallest joined table (provided the joinfields are unque) –  Eugen Rieck May 8 '12 at 19:07
    
Thanks for your answer, Eugen. That explains a lot, and looking back at the data I was provided I found that the initial premise was not correct. There are duplicate sn's in t2, which is causing the returned values to be beyond the expectation were they unique. Thanks all for your contributions. –  MikeC May 8 '12 at 19:15

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