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I have a C++ program that has the following form:

int main(){
    int answer;

    ...

    MEMORY_CONSUMING_DATA_ARRAY temp;
    a few operations on the above;
    answer=result of these operations;

    ... //More code
}

That is, I have a small block of code which doesn't seem to warrant its own function, but which uses a great deal of memory.

I'd like to bring the memory-consuming variable (a class) into existence within a limited scope to produce a result and then have it destroyed. A helper function would do this easily enough, but it seems like over-kill in the scenario in which I'm working.

Any thoughts on how to accomplish this?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Why doesn't it warrant its own function?? –  Crazy Eddie May 8 '12 at 21:06
1  
@CrazyEddie, I hope I haven't misinterpreted, but I see your question as an oblique way of saying that I should use a helper function. We could discuss this at length, but our discussion would boil down to the meta-question of whether it is always better to use helper functions - at which point we'd agree that it isn't always so. Please, trust my design choice or suggest technical reasons as per the answers below why I should use a helper function. It's certainly an option if there are sound reasons behind it. –  Richard May 8 '12 at 21:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

if destruction is what you need:

int main() {
    int answer;

    ...
    { // << added braces
      MEMORY_CONSUMING_DATA_ARRAY temp;
      a few operations on the above;
      answer=result of these operations;
    }
    ... //More code
}

so that would work for a collection/object backed by a dynamic allocation, such as std::vector.

but for large stack allocations... you're at the compiler's mercy. the compiler may decide it's best to cleanup the stack after your function returns, or it may incrementally perform cleanup within the function. when i say cleanup, i am referring to the stack allocations your function required -- not destruction.

To expand on this:

Destruction of a dynamic allocation:

int main() {
    int answer;
    ...
    { // << added braces
      std::vector<char> temp(BigNumber);
      a few operations on the above;
      answer=result of these operations;
      // temp's destructor is called, and the allocation
      // required for its elements returned
    }
    ... //More code
}

versus a stack allocation:

int main() {
    int answer;
    ...
    {
      char temp[BigNumber];
      a few operations on the above;
      answer=result of these operations;
    }

    // whether the region used by `temp` is reused
    // before the function returns is not specified
    // by the language. it may or may not, depending
    // on the compiler, targeted architecture or
    // optimization level.

    ... //More code
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you expound on your last line? I'm pretty sure destruction is what I want... but maybe you could clarify? –  Richard May 8 '12 at 18:38
    
@Richard np - expanded –  justin May 8 '12 at 18:51
2  
@Richard correct. the language does not specify whether or not the allocation will be 'returned' by the time ... //More code is executed. it will be out of scope, but the stack position may or may not be restored. in other words, whether the region used by MEMORY_CONSUMING_DATA_ARRAY temp; is or is not reused within the function is not defined by the language. –  justin May 8 '12 at 19:48
1  
@Richard just to expand on this: the c++ language (as well as c) is aimed at portability and performance, and its specifications are written for an abstract machine. it's (generally) the compiler's job to determine how the c++ program (written for an abstract machine) is represented/interpreted as instructions for the architecture being targeted. therefore, changing compilers and/or architectures may produce different results in this (and several other) regard; e.g. MEMORY_CONSUMING_DATA_ARRAY temp;'s region may be reused in an embedded environment, an it may not on a 64 bit desktop system. –  justin May 8 '12 at 20:15
1  
The documentation for MSVC's alloca on MSDN clarifies that memory with alloca remains in scope until the function ends, which gives evidence that VC++ keeps stack space that long. –  Mooing Duck May 8 '12 at 20:43

Justin's answer is fine but if you are performing this operation again and again then you may want to reuse this memory.

EDIT

As pointed out static will make the memory not allocate on the stack which may benefit you, also it would be optional if you needed to zero the memory each time, if you were going to copy over the same amount each time and not going to read past this point then you could save a call to zeromemory or other initialisation call.

int main(){
    int answer;

    ...

    {
      static MEMORY_CONSUMING_DATA_ARRAY temp; // make this static or a member perhaps
      temp = 0; // initialise it every time to clear the memory or zeromemory or other op
      a few operations on the above;
      answer=result of these operations;
    }
    ... //More code
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This makes no sense... the cost of allocating in the stack is just an increment to a pointer (as a matter of fact, many times not even that, since the compiler will calculate the required space up front). The main cost is that of initialization of the array (if needed) and that is also endured in your approach. The advice is sound, but for other reasons. A static local variable will not be allocated in the stack, which can be an advantage if the object is big enough (as in this case). The advantage, again, is not performance of allocation, but rather not using stack memory. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 8 '12 at 20:13
1  
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas fair point, I wanted to make the point that if you were repeatedly requesting the same large amount of memory then you could re-use it, making it static does not allocate on the stack as you point out, in fact if the memory being reused was going to overwrite the same amount of memory each time then we would not need to wipe it in between calls but we don't know how this memory is being used by the OP. –  EdChum May 8 '12 at 20:19

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