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I'm using the styles from twitter bootstrap and have a question about inheritance.

I'd like to make two label classes that'd inherit the label styles from bootstrap.

.label-new {
    .label; .label-important;
}
.label-updated {
    .label; .label-warning;
}

However, the above would result in LESS parse error "NameError: .label-important is undefined" because .label-important and .label-warning are defined using the following in bootstrap:

.label,
.badge {
  // Important (red)
  &-important         { background-color: @errorText; }
  &-important[href]   { background-color: darken(@errorText, 10%); }
  // Warnings (orange)
  &-warning           { background-color: @orange; }
  &-warning[href]     { background-color: darken(@orange, 10%); }
}

Is there any special syntax to inherit the .label-important/warning?

Thanks in advance.

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I believe that just mixing in .label in your two new classes will give you .lable-new-important and .label-new-warning (etc.). I'm guessing you only want the important properties for new and the warning properties for updated, is that your goal? –  ScottS May 8 '12 at 19:24
    
Yes, that's correct. And I'd prefer not to redefine the colors like suggested below. So it seems like a limitation of LESS unfortunately. –  Cat May 9 '12 at 0:28
    
Yes, it does seem like a functionality that would be useful. I've added another suggestion if you don't want color definitions in two places. These are the only two suggestions I have. –  ScottS May 9 '12 at 0:39
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1 Answer 1

I think you can only inherit the .label which should give .label-new-important and .label-new-warning (and equivalent for updated). If that is not desireable, and you want new added extensions, you probably need to define the colors again directly for the .label to isolate and define what you want. Like so:

.label { 
  // New (red) 
  &-new           { background-color: @errorText; } 
  &-new[href]     { background-color: darken(@errorText, 10%); } 
  // Updated (orange) 
  &-updated       { background-color: @orange; } 
  &-updated[href] { background-color: darken(@orange, 10%); } 
} 

EDIT (If you don't want to redefine the colors but use a mixin)

To avoid a redefining of the colors, then you need to change the original definition, and do this:

First, delete the original .label and .badge definitions, and then second, define them more explicitly like so:

.label-important,
.badge-important {
  // Important (red)
  { background-color: @errorText; }
  { background-color: darken(@errorText, 10%); }
}

.label-warning,
.badge-warning {
  // Warnings (orange)
  { background-color: @orange; }
  { background-color: darken(@orange, 10%); }
}

.label-new {
    .label-important;
}

.label-updated {
    .label-warning;
}
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