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I currently have a windows service that runs every 5 minutes. The code selects rows from a database for processing. There is a cap (maximum rows allowed to be selected) so the number of rows selected could be anywhere from 0-100.

I am looking to do some processing on these rows based on a random percentage selection.

  • Task 1 25%
  • Task 2 50%
  • Task 3 100%

For simplicity, let's assume the service selects 100 rows, then 25 randomly selected rows will run Task 1, 50 randomly selected rows will run Task 2, and all of the rows will run Task 3.

The code I have currently looks something like:

var rows = repository.GetRows(100);

foreach(var row in rows)
{
    task1.Run(row);
    task2.Run(row);
    task3.Run(row);
}

This will run all three tasks on all rows. How would I go about only selecting the allotted percentages to each task?

share|improve this question
    
you mean selecting a random row from rows based on precemtage – COLD TOLD May 8 '12 at 19:50
up vote 2 down vote accepted

probably a bit rustic...

var rows = repository.GetRows(100);

rows.OrderBy(Guid.NewGuid()).Take(25).ToList().ForEach(m => task1.Run(m));
rows.OrderBy(Guid.NewGuid()).Take(50).ToList().ForEach(m => task2.Run(m));
rows.ToList().ForEach(m => task3.Run(m));
share|improve this answer
1  
NewGuid() is... passable as a source of random data, and "random enough" for your everyday shuffle, but as mentioned in comments to another answer, GUIDs themselves are supposed to be unique, not necessarily random (the equivalent would not work in T-SQL for instance, which uses a different GUID algorithm). – KeithS May 8 '12 at 23:37

You can define a Shuffle() extension method that performs a Fisher-Yates-Durstenfeld shuffle (which executes in linear time as opposed to OrderBy's NlogN time):

public static IEnumerable<T> Shuffle<T>(this IEnumerable<T> input)
{
    var buffer = input.ToArray();
    //Math.Random is OK for "everyday" randomness;
    //you should use RNGCryptoServiceProvider if you need 
    //cryptographically-strong randomness
    var rng = new Math.Random();

    //as the loop proceeds, the element to output will be randomly chosen
    //from the elements at index i or above, which will then be swapped with i;
    //the yield return gives us each shuffled value as it is chosen, and
    //allows the shuffling to happen "lazily".
    for (int i = 0; i < buffer.Length; i++)
    {
        int j = rng.Next(i, buffer.Length);
        yield return buffer[j];
        //if we cared about the elements in the buffer this would be a swap,
        //but we don't, so...    
        buffer[j] = buffer[i];
    }
}

//simple extension method to provide List.ForEach()-like functionality
//on any collection or IEnumerable.
public static void ForEach(this IEnumerable<T> collection, Action<T> action)
{
    foreach(var element in collection) action(element);
}

//Usage - pretty much the same as Raphael's, 
//but now you don't have to convert to a List to use ForEach:
rows.Shuffle().Take(25).ForEach(m => task1.Run(m));
rows.Shuffle().Take(50).ForEach(m => task2.Run(m));
rows.ForEach(m => task3.Run(m));
share|improve this answer
    
in the second call, the () is missing from the rows.Shuffle. ;) – Lucas Reis May 8 '12 at 20:49
    
Edited. Thanks. – KeithS May 8 '12 at 21:06

You can get a random sub collection with something like this:

task1.Run(rows);
task2.Run(rows.OrderBy(x => Guid.NewGuid()).Take(25));
task2.Run(rows.OrderBy(x => Guid.NewGuid()).Take(50))
share|improve this answer
    
Wow I need to look into this more I had no idea you could grab a random sub collection like that, – K'Leg May 8 '12 at 20:04
1  
AFAIK Guids are not random. – Paul Phillips May 8 '12 at 20:22
1  
@scottm How can that be? My intuition is that you're treating GUIDs like a random number here. If they're not random, you can't get a truly random ordering. Am I making an oversight? (This is mostly academic, since it's not clear how strongly "random" the question needs, but I'm curious) – Paul Phillips May 8 '12 at 20:32
1  
@PaulPhillips, I'm treating the sort order of a given set of GUIDs as random, not the GUIDs themselves. For most scenarios, this is "random enough". – scottm May 8 '12 at 20:42
1  
@scottm: Technically you're right, but using NewGuid() as a source of random data is generally not something to be encouraged. GUID values are guaranteed to be unique, not random, and it's only the fact that 95% of the data of a V4 GUID (which NewGuid() generates) is generated via PRNG that makes this work. If the GUID were instead a V1 GUID, the values would trend predictably upwards and the shuffle wouldn't work at all. – KeithS May 8 '12 at 23:16

You can use Knuth's approach to Random Sampling (select m items from n) for this case:

var rows = repository.GetRows(100);
int[] maxTake = new[] {25,50,100};
int remaining = rows.Length;
Random rand = new Random();

for (int i = 0; i < rows.Length; i++)
{
    var num = rand.Next() % remaining;
    if (num < maxTake[0])
    {
        task1.Run(rows[i]);
        maxTake[0]--;
    }
    if (num < maxTake[1])
    {
        task2.Run(rows[i]);
        maxTake[1]--;
    }
    if (num < maxTake[2])
    {
        task3.Run(rows[i]);
        maxTake[2]--;
    }
    remaining--;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks biased; all of the elements that are passed to task1 are also passed to task2. Most other answers are shuffling the collection before choosing each of the sample sets, so an element that is part of the "task1 group" is not guaranteed to also be in the "task2 group". – KeithS May 8 '12 at 23:53
    
The random selection will probably also bias unnaturally towards either the latter half of the collection, or towards an even distribution based on the current order. Each element selected reduces the chance that elements immediately after it will be selected, while each element not selected will increase the chances of the next one being selected. This will either pick roughly every Nth one, or arrive at a state where it must use all the remaining elements in order to fill the quota. Probably both. – KeithS May 9 '12 at 0:00

obtain 25 Random Unique numbers

 Random rand=new Random()

 int[] task1nums = new int[25];
 for (int i=0;i<25;i++);
 {
    int r=rand.Next(100);

    while (task1nums.Contains(r))
    {
        r=rand.Next(100);
    }
    task1nums[i]=r;
}

obtain 50 Random Unique numbers

 int[] task2nums = new int[50];
 for (int i=0;i<50;i++);
 {
    int r=rand.Next(100);

    while (task2nums.Contains(r))
    {
        r=rand.Next(100);
    }
    task2nums[i]=r;
}

So now you have 25 random numbers and 50 random numbers

var rows = repository.GetRows(100);
int counter=0
foreach(var row in rows)
{
    if (task1nums.Contains(counter))
    task1.Run(row);
    if (task2nums.Contains(counter))
    task2.Run(row);


    task3.Run(row);

    counter++;
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Yes I really spread this out to make it easier to read. It can be simplified considerably. – K'Leg May 8 '12 at 20:02
    
Apparently my answer is no where near as nice as the above ones. While I do believe it will work it is far too cumbersome. – K'Leg May 8 '12 at 20:04
    
N-squared complexity; you must iterate through your collections of random numbers (which are bound to the size of the input) once per row. Like you said, it'll work but most of the other answers are more elegant. – KeithS May 9 '12 at 0:15

You can use a Random instance to generate a random value – between 0.0 and 1.0 – for each row.

Approximately 25% of your rows would have a generated value of less than 0.25; and approximately 50% of your rows would have a generated value of less than 0.5.

var rows = repository.GetRows(100);

Random random = new Random();

task1.Run(rows.Where(_ => random.NextDouble() <= 0.25));
task2.Run(rows.Where(_ => random.NextDouble() <= 0.5));
task3.Run(row);

If you want to guarantee that you will get exactly 25% and 50% of your rows collection (rounded down), use:

Random random = new Random();

var rows = repository.GetRows(100);
var rowsRandomized = rows.OrderBy(_ => random.NextDouble());

task2.Run(rowsRandomized.Take((int)(0.25 * rows.Count())));
task2.Run(rowsRandomized.Take((int)(0.5 * rows.Count())));
task3.Run(rowsRandomized);
share|improve this answer
1  
But you don't guarantee that 25 in 100 rows will be selected with this method... – Lucas Reis May 8 '12 at 20:01
    
Fixed in latest edit. – Douglas May 8 '12 at 20:19
    
Um, rowsRandomized will be an IEnumerable<double>; you'll have lost all the original row data. In addition, the cast of a float to an integer will always round down instead of to the nearest integer, which will understate the number of rows that should be taken when the total number doesn't divide evenly by 4. – KeithS May 9 '12 at 0:15
    
You’re right on the first point; now corrected. As for the rounding down, I had already mentioned that in my answer. – Douglas May 9 '12 at 18:18

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