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I had this question on my test:

What kind of programming / design pattern is this:

FileReader fr = new FileReader("file.txt");
BufferedReader bf = new BufferedReader(fr);

I'm sorry for the trouble, but definitions of programming patterns are unclear for me and I don't know how to answer this question correctly.

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I believe they're looking for the decorator pattern. –  James Montagne May 8 '12 at 19:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

That's an example of the Decorator Pattern.

As the linked Wikipedia article states:

Decorator pattern is a design pattern that allows behaviour to be added to an existing object dynamically.

In your example, you're adding buffering to a FileReader, which provides more efficient reading than a regular, un-buffered FileReader.

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This is Decorator pattern. From Design Patterns book:

Intent: attach additional responsibilities to an object dynamically. Decorators provide a flexible alternative to subclassing for extending functionality

...

Applicability: Use Decorator

  • to add responsibilities to individual objects dynamically and transparently, that is, without affecting other objects.
  • for responsibilities that can be withdrawn.
  • when extension by subclassing is impractical. Sometimes a large number of independent extensions are possible and would produce an explosion of subclasses to support every combination. Or a class definition may be hidden or otherwise unavailable for subclassing.

In case of BufferedReader, it attaches buffering feature to FileReader.

If you want to know more about patterns, I recommend reading this book (or more lighter "Head First Patterns"). Additionally, there's brilliant answer on SO about patterns usage inside JDK -- very cool stuff!

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