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I have the following grammar, which I'm told is LR(1) but not SLR(1):

S ::= a A | b A c | d c | b d a

A ::= d

I don't understand why this is. How would you prove this?

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5  
If you are going to make a career in the computer business, you need to learn to read when you don't know something. Read Wikipedia on LR languages carefully, and work this out. If it takes some time to stare at it and understand, so be it; this is typical. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LR_parser –  Ira Baxter May 8 '12 at 20:35
    
Thanks, you've been very helpful! –  Konstantinos Georgiadis May 9 '12 at 15:53
    
In a gruff sort of way, yes :-} –  Ira Baxter May 9 '12 at 16:05

2 Answers 2

I don't have enough karma to comment on the above answer, and I'm a bit late to this question, but...

I've seen this grammar as an example elsewhere and the OP actually made a typo. It should be:

S ::= A a | b A c | d c | b d a

A ::= d

i.e., the very first clause of S is 'A a', not 'a A'.

In this case the FOLLOWS set for A is { $, a, c} and there is an SLR conflict in state 8.

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One way to figure this out would be to try to construct LR(1) and SLR(1) parsers for the grammar. If we find any shift/reduce or reduce/reduce conflicts in the course of doing so, we can show that the grammar must not belong to one of those classes of languages.

Let's start off with the SLR(1) parser. First, we need to compute the LR(0) configurating sets for the grammar. These are seen here:

(1)
S -> .aA
S -> .bAc
S -> .dc
S -> .bda

(2)
S -> a.A
A -> .d

(3)
S -> aA.

(4)
A -> d.

(5)
S -> b.Ac
S -> b.da
A -> .d

(6)
S -> bA.c

(7)
S -> bAc.

(8)
S -> bd.a
A -> d.

(9)
S -> bda.

(10)
S -> d.c

(11)
S -> dc.

Next, we need to get the FOLLOW sets for all the nonterminals. This is shown here:

FOLLOW(S) = { $ }
FOLLOW(A) = { $, c }

Given this, we can go back and upgrade the LR(0) configurating sets into SLR(1) configurating sets:

(1)
S -> .aA    [ $ ]
S -> .bAc   [ $ ]
S -> .dc    [ $ ]
S -> .bda   [ $ ]

(2)
S -> a.A    [ $ ]
A -> .d     [ $, c ]

(3)
S -> aA.    [ $ ]

(4)
A -> d.     [ $, c ]

(5)
S -> b.Ac   [ $ ]
S -> b.da   [ $ ]
A -> .d     [ $, c ]

(6)
S -> bA.c   [ $ ]

(7)
S -> bAc.   [ $ ]

(8)
S -> bd.a   [ $ ]
A -> d.     [ $, c ]

(9)
S -> bda.   [ $ ]

(10)
S -> d.c    [ $ ]

(11)
S -> dc.    [ $ ]

Interestingly enough, there are no conflicts here! The only possible shift/reduce conflict is in state (8), but there is no conflict here because the shift action is on a and the reduce is on $. Consequently, this grammar actually is SLR(1). Since any SLR(1) grammar is also LR(1), this means that the grammar is both SLR(1) and LR(1).

Hope this helps!

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1  
Just note that every grammar SLR (1) is LR (1) grammar but not all LR (1) is SLR (1) –  Tom Sarduy Sep 5 '12 at 4:24
    
If you are looking for an example you can use this grammar: 1) S –> XX 2) X –> aX 3) X –> b –  Tom Sarduy Sep 5 '12 at 4:32

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