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When creating a certificate with makecert on Windows Server 2003, I'd have to set the permissions on the private key to be accessible to NETWORK SERVICE so that the private key could be read by the WCF service. I could access the file by navigating to C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Microsoft\Crypto\RSA\MachineKeys. Once I set read permissions for NETWORK SERVICE, everything worked fine.

I'm looking at Windows Server 2008, and can't find a similar locaiton in C:\Users or anywhere else. What is the proper mechanism for setting permissions to the private key? Where are they located? I'm using makecert to directly install it to TrustedPeople / localmachine

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Looks like the tool to use here is WinHttpCertCfg.exe. This is the cleaner way to set permissions on a certificate private key than the method I described above. My guess is that in Windows 2008 and beyond, MS decided to hide the keys in a more discrete location.

I used WinHttpCertCfg to set the permissions. Here's an example command to grant read permissions to NETWORK SERVICE for a cert named MyCert01 in LOCAL_MACHINE\TrustedPeople.

winhttpcertcfg.exe -g -c LOCAL_MACHINE\TrustedPeople -s MyCert01 -a "NETWORK SERVICE"
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Warning: the "-s" param of winhttpcertcfg is a case-insensitive substring search of the "Subject" name of the cert and -g only grants to the first cert that is found. This is a problem if you have two certs and one does't have a specific enough Subject name. eg: if the first cert has "Subject: CN = ABC, O = MyCompany" and the second cert has "Subject: CN = MyCompany" then there is no way to find the second cert... –  Peter McEvoy Jan 14 at 9:21

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