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I have two build environments to target; Release and Staging. The Web.config looks like this:

<system.web>     
    <authentication mode="Windows">
    </authentication>

    <authorization>
        <deny users="?" />
    </authorization>
</system.web>

I want to transform it by building to staging config: Web.Staging.config

<system.web>     
    <authentication mode="Windows">
    </authentication>

    <authorization xdt:Transform="Replace">
        <deny users="?" />
        <allow roles="StagingRoles" />
        <deny users="*" />
    </authorization>
</system.web>

I build from command line like this:

msbuild buildscript.build /p:Configuration=Staging

After the build, I don't see the web.config file transformed in the build artifacts folder. Is there something wrong here?

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

If you add the following xml to the bottom of the .csproj file for your web application, you'll ensure that the config transformation occurs before every build:

<Import Project="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath32)\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v10.0\WebApplications\Microsoft.WebApplication.targets" />
<Target Name="BeforeBuild">
    <TransformXml Source="Web.Base.config" Transform="Web.$(Configuration).config" Destination="Web.config" />
</Target>

Edit: In response to your comment, you should be able to use Web.config as the source parameter in the TransformXml task (see step #2). If you only want to perform the config transform in the build script, follow these instructions:

1) Import WebApplication.targets in your build script like so:

<Import Project="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath32)\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v10.0\WebApplications\Microsoft.WebApplication.targets" />

2) Execute the TransformXml build task in your build script target:

<Target Name="MyBuildScriptTarget">
    <TransformXml Source="Web.config" Transform="Web.$(Configuration).config" Destination="Web.config" />
    ...other build tasks...
</Target>
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Thanks for the quick response. The problem with this is, I will need to maintain another config file: Web.base.config. When I build solution with VS, it will transform the Web.config which is not necessary. I want the transformation when I run the build script. –  sheldon_cooper May 8 '12 at 21:35
    
@sheldon_cooper I updated my answer. –  Jonathan McIntire May 8 '12 at 22:10
    
This works but one problem. When the transform happens, I get an error somewhat like this: Web.config file is being used by another process. I called this after the compilation target. –  sheldon_cooper May 9 '12 at 1:34
1  
If you move your Web.config to another directory, you can change the Source parameter of TransfromXml to something like Source="ConfigDir\Web.config". If you do that, you'll probably want to perform the config transformation in the BeforeBuild target so that changes made to ConfigDir\Web.config are always copied to the root directory. The other option is to create a Web.Base.config file that you will have to maintain. –  Jonathan McIntire May 9 '12 at 2:03
    
Thanks jmac, worked beautifully. –  sheldon_cooper May 9 '12 at 17:57

Jonathan's answer is good. I tweaked it slightly to allow the original Web.config file to be retained. These are the lines I added to the bottom of my .csproj file:

  <!-- the step to copy the config file first avoids a 'File is being used by another process' error -->
  <Target Name="BeforeBuild">
    <Copy SourceFiles="Web.config" DestinationFiles="Web.temp.config" OverwriteReadOnlyFiles="True" />
    <TransformXml Source="Web.temp.config" Transform="Web.$(Configuration).config" Destination="Web.config" />
  </Target>
  <Target Name="AfterBuild">
    <Copy SourceFiles="Web.temp.config" DestinationFiles="Web.config" OverwriteReadOnlyFiles="True" />
    <Delete Files="Web.temp.config" />
  </Target>

I can see that the web.config file is transformed by running a build within Visual Studio (or from a command line).

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