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Let me start off by saying that I am not an expert in C. I have been reviewing the code of a JSON parser.

I am trying to understand this piece of code.

/* Render the cstring provided to an escaped version that can be printed. */
static char *print_string_ptr(const char *str)
{
    const char *ptr;
    char *ptr2,*out;
    int len=0;
    unsigned char token;

    if (!str)
        return cJSON_strdup("");
    ptr = str;
    while ((token = *ptr) && ++len) {
        if (strchr("\"\\\b\f\n\r\t", token))
            len++;
        else if (token < 32)
            len += 5;
        ptr++;
    }

    out = (char*)cJSON_malloc(len + 3);
    if (!out)
      return 0;

    ptr2 = out;
    ptr = str;
    *ptr2++ = '\"';
    while (*ptr) {
        if ((unsigned char)*ptr > 31 && *ptr != '\"' && *ptr != '\\')
            *ptr2++ = *ptr++;
        else {
            *ptr2++ = '\\';
            switch (token = *ptr++) {
                case '\\':      *ptr2++='\\';   break;
                case '\"':      *ptr2++='\"';   break;
                case '\b':      *ptr2++='b';    break;
                case '\f':      *ptr2++='f';    break;
                case '\n':      *ptr2++='n';    break;
                case '\r':      *ptr2++='r';    break;
                case '\t':      *ptr2++='t';    break;
                default:
                    /* escape and print */
                    sprintf(ptr2, "u%04x", token);
                    ptr2 += 5;
                    break;
            }
        }
    }
    *ptr2++ = '\"';
    *ptr2++ = 0;
    return out;
}

A really general summary of how this code actually works would be really great, my impression has been that it is "beautifying" the JSON string, is that correct?

At first glance it appears to be replacing \r with r, but what would the point of this be?

I have been researching the functionality of sprintf, but for simple things such as printing out currency values or other formatting issues. But I haven't got a clue what the sprintf function is doing here:

sprintf(ptr2,"u%04x",token);ptr2+=5;

And what is the purpose of the ptr2+=5 ?

Any insight into this would really be helpful.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What it's doing is turning control characters into the escape sequences you'd normally use in C source code.

if ((unsigned char)*ptr>31 && *ptr!='\"' && *ptr!='\\') 
    *ptr2++=*ptr++;

This is basically saying "if we have a normal character like a letter, digit, etc., just copy it directly from input to output."

 else
 {
     *ptr2++='\\';

Otherwise, we're going to produce an escape sequence in the output, which will start with a backslash.

     switch (token=*ptr++)
     {
         case '\\':      *ptr2++='\\';   break;
         case '\"':      *ptr2++='\"';   break;
         case '\b':      *ptr2++='b';    break;

Then, depending on which control character it finds, it generates the second character of the escape sequence, so an actual 'backspace' character in the input (which will compare equal to '\b') will produce the two characters `\' and 'b' in the output.

          case '\f':      *ptr2++='f';    break;
          case '\n':      *ptr2++='n';    break;
          case '\r':      *ptr2++='r';    break;
          case '\t':      *ptr2++='t';    break;

and the same for form-feed, new-line, carriage return and tab.

          default: sprintf(ptr2,"u%04x",token);ptr2+=5;   break;  

Otherwise, render the control character in hexadecimal, so it becomes something like \1234.

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Very well explained, ty for the time it took! –  Doug Molineux May 8 '12 at 21:20

What this code is doing is replacing non-printable characters such as U+000A (line feed) with escape sequences in the string such as \n (two characters, \\ and n).

The variable ptr2 points to the current point in the output, and the variable ptr points to the current point in the string that is being written to the output.

// Write "u" followed by a 4-digit hexadecimal number to the output
sprintf(ptr2,"u%04x",token);
// Advance the output pointer by five spaces
ptr2 += 5; 

By comparison,

*ptr2++ = 'r';

Is the same as,

// Write "r" to the output
*ptr = 'r';
// Advance the output pointer one space
ptr++;
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Brilliant thank you so much –  Doug Molineux May 8 '12 at 21:12

The function is escaping the string content, not beautifying it - for example it converts a carriage return character (ASCII code 13) into the string \r, it converts other non-printable characters in their code ect.

sprintf(ptr2,"u%04x",token);

places into ptr2 the hexadecimal representation of token (the x), padded with 0s to be four character in lenght (the 04), and prefixed with u - the following

ptr2+=5;

moves the ptr2 pointer right after the string that has been just generated by sprintf - that is 5 characters long.

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