Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need an algorithm or a standard library function for comparing two vector elements, like below:

class Utility
{
    template <class T>
    static bool CheckIfVectorsEquivalent(   const std::vector<T> & Vec1,
                                            const std::vector<T> & Vec2)
    {
        // ???
    }
};

Working under the following specifications:

std::vector<int> v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7, v8;

// Returns false when not all the elements are matching between vectors
v1.push_back(1);
v1.push_back(3);
v1.push_back(5);
v2.push_back(2);
v2.push_back(3);
v2.push_back(8);
Utility::CheckIfVectorsEquivalent(v1, v2);  // Must return false

// Returns true when all the elements match, even if the are not in the same order
v3.push_back(3);
v3.push_back(1);
v3.push_back(7);
v4.push_back(7);
v4.push_back(3);
v4.push_back(1);
Utility::CheckIfVectorsEquivalent(v3, v4);  // Must return true

// Returns false when one of the vectors is subset of the other one
v5.push_back(3);
v5.push_back(1);
v5.push_back(7);
v6.push_back(7);
v6.push_back(3);
v6.push_back(1);
v6.push_back(18);
v6.push_back(51);
Utility::CheckIfVectorsEquivalent(v5, v6);  // Must return false

// Returns true when the both vectors are empty
Utility::CheckIfVectorsEquivalent(v7, v8);  // Must return true

Is there any standard (with STL) way of doing this? If not, how can I write this algorithm? It confused me too much.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you can live with just a c++11 solution, then std::is_permutation is exactly what you want

template <class FI1, class FI2>
bool is_permutation ( FI1 first, FI1 last, FI2 d_first );

If you can't do that, then in the upcoming boost 1.50 release, there will be

boost::algorithm::is_permutation

with the same interface.

share|improve this answer
2  
Standard says, that std::is_permutation, compares elements at most O(n^2), so this is probably slower, but it's short to write. – Rafał Rawicki May 8 '12 at 21:44
    
It's O(N^2) though. – Alan Stokes May 8 '12 at 21:46
    
I think this is the best answer, as it doesn't make assumptions of order on the type T. – ex0du5 May 9 '12 at 0:29
    
Definitely O(N^2) in the worst case, but it uses no additional memory. – Marshall Clow May 9 '12 at 13:16

The standard way will be sorting these two vectors and using operator ==, which compares corresponding values.

The sample solution realizing this algorithm is:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

template<typename T>
bool compare(std::vector<T>& v1, std::vector<T>& v2)
{
    std::sort(v1.begin(), v1.end());
    std::sort(v2.begin(), v2.end());
    return v1 == v2;
}

Its complexity is O(n*log(n)), because of the sorting.

share|improve this answer
3  
Doing a O(n^2) comparison might be faster for very small sets, but only for small sets. This answer is accurate for 99% of the time. – Mooing Duck May 8 '12 at 21:24
    
"It is also the fastest possible algorithm" Proof? – SigTerm May 8 '12 at 21:28
1  
Not using sets or other things like that, but simply sorting vectors comes from my experience. From the complexity point of view this is O(n log n). That means, you have (without any other assumptions) to recognize n! different vectors as equal, and the size of that decision tree is log(n!) = Omega(n log n). More precise proof can be done similarily to the sorting lower bound. – Rafał Rawicki May 8 '12 at 21:40
1  
@AlanStokes: And there are O(N) best case sorts. As I said "the fastest possible" is not a guarantee and IMO should be removed. – SigTerm May 8 '12 at 22:06
1  
@RafałRawicki: Did you just get bullied into changing one wrong answer into another, worse answer? Your answer still only makes sense with an order, but now you've removed an interesting (and correct) comment on complexity in that case. – ex0du5 May 9 '12 at 15:53

Create a multiset from each vector, then just compare them for equality.

share|improve this answer

There's an O(n) solution to this problem for unsorted inputs:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/function_output_iterator.hpp>

template <typename T>
T xorfunc(const T& a, const T& b) {
  return a^b;
}

template <typename T>
bool compare(const std::vector<T>& v1, const std::vector<T>& v2) {
  if (v1.size() != v2.size())
    return false;

  T result = 0;
  std::transform(v1.begin(), v1.end(), v2.begin(), boost::make_function_output_iterator([&result](const T& r) { result ^= r; }), std::ptr_fun(&xorfunc<T>));
  return !result;
}

that works for integer inputs and exploits the fact that a ^ b ^ c ^ d == 0 for any combination of paired values. It will never give false negatives, it might give false positives potentially, but you can reduce those further in O(n) space/time. If you're mostly hitting negatives then this might be useful as a pre-sort+compare step to rule them out quickly. It works for all the test cases you've shown:

int main() {
    std::vector<int> v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7, v8;

    // Returns false when not all the elements are matching between vectors
    v1.push_back(1);
    v1.push_back(3);
    v1.push_back(5);
    v2.push_back(2);
    v2.push_back(3);
    v2.push_back(8);
    std::cout << compare(v1, v2) << " (false)" << std::endl;  // Must return false

    // Returns true when all the elements match, even if the are not in the same order
    v3.push_back(3);
    v3.push_back(1);
    v3.push_back(7);
    v4.push_back(7);
    v4.push_back(3);
    v4.push_back(1);
    std::cout << compare(v3, v4) << " (true)" << std::endl;  // Must return true

    // Returns false when one of the vectors is subset of the other one
    v5.push_back(3);
    v5.push_back(1);
    v5.push_back(7);
    v6.push_back(7);
    v6.push_back(3);
    v6.push_back(1);
    v6.push_back(18);
    v6.push_back(51);
    std::cout << compare(v5, v6) << " false" << std::endl;  // Must return false

    // Returns true when the both vectors are empty
    std::cout << compare(v7, v8) << " true" << std::endl;  // Must return true

}

Gives:

0 (false)
1 (true)
0 false
1 true
share|improve this answer
    
If they are sorted already, you can just use operator== on vectors. – Rafał Rawicki May 8 '12 at 21:22
2  
How is mismatch an improvement on straight equality after sorting? – Alan Stokes May 8 '12 at 21:23
    
The iterator it gives you tells you where the difference lies which may/may not be of interest – Flexo May 8 '12 at 21:26
1  
@awoodland There are cases where this returns true incorrectly. – Alan Stokes May 8 '12 at 21:50
1  
@awoodland: Judging from a quick glance, you want to xor all elements and expect to get zero if they're all equal, right? Here's the problem: Vec1[0, 12]; Vec2[4, 8]. – SigTerm May 8 '12 at 22:02

Simplest way to do it is to create copies of Vec1 and Vec2, sort them and compare using ==.

Another way to do it is to build two multisets from Vec1 and Vec2 and compare them using ==.

Yet another way to do it is to use maps (std::map or unordered_map) to store counters - i.e. increment stored value for every element of Vec1 and decrement for every stored element of Vec2, then check if map contains non-zero elements. If there are non-zero elements stored in map, vectors are non-equal.

messy pseudocode example:

std::vector<Value> vec1, vec2;
//initialize vec1 and vec2, fill with data
typedef int Counter;
typedef unordered_map<Value, Counter> CounterMap;

CounterMap counters;
for (size_t i = 0; i < vec1.size(); i++)
    counters[vec1[i]]++;
for (size_t i = 0; i < vec2.size(); i++)
    counters[vec2[i]]--;

bool equal = true;
for (CounterMap::const_iterator i = coutners.begin(); equal && (i != counters.end()); i++)
    if (i->second != 0)
        equal = false;

Depending on your STL (or boost) implementation, data type, and order of stored data in vectors) one of those methods will be faster, but it is hard to tell which one.

share|improve this answer
2  
Equality comparison of unordered multisets is worst-case O(N^2), so probably worth avoiding. – Alan Stokes May 8 '12 at 21:43

If we consider an int to be large enough for the computations done in the following algorithm, there is a simple O(N) algorithm.

0: initialization: There are primes to the size of max(v1,v2), product1=1, product2=1

1: return false if size of v1 != size of v2

2:

foreach (  i in v1 ) {
   product1 *= primes[v1[i]]
   product2 *= primes[v2[i]]
}

3.

result product1 == product2;
share|improve this answer
  v7.push_back(3);
  v7.push_back(1);
  v7.push_back(7);

  v8.push_back(7);
  v8.push_back(3);
  v8.push_back(1);
  v8.push_back(1);
  v8.push_back(7);

  std::cout << compare(v7, v8) << " true or false" << std::endl;  

the condition as above, the function compare will return true or false.I lost count. if return true. we can't use the way: The standard way will be sorting these two vectors and using operator ==, which compares corresponding values.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.