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Using global variables in a function other than the one that created them

Hello Guys! I have the following script:

COUNT = 0

def increment():
    COUNT = COUNT+1

increment()

print COUNT

I just want to increment global variable COUNT, but this gives me the following error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 6, in <module>
    increment()
  File "test.py", line 4, in increment
    COUNT = COUNT+1
UnboundLocalError: local variable 'COUNT' referenced before assignment

Can anyone explain me why it is so?

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marked as duplicate by Kev May 9 '12 at 0:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This should answer your question: stackoverflow.com/questions/423379/… Looks like Python won't change the global value unless you specify that it's what you want to do. –  Phil Nicholson May 8 '12 at 21:46
1  
The use of global among beginners is usually a sign of bad design. –  Rik Poggi May 8 '12 at 21:51
    
without using global you can't modify the value of a global variable inside a function, you can only use it's value inside the function. But if you want to assign a new value to it then you've to use the global keyword first. –  undefined is not a function May 8 '12 at 21:53
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2 Answers

its a global variable so do this :

COUNT = 0

def increment():
    global COUNT
    COUNT = COUNT+1

increment()

print COUNT

Global variables can be accessed without declaring the global but if you are going to change their values the global declaration is required.

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This is because globals don't bleed into the scope of your function. You have to use the global statement to force this for assignment:

>>> COUNT = 0
>>> def increment():
...     global COUNT
...     COUNT += 1
... 
>>> increment()
>>> print(COUNT)
1

Note that using globals is a really bad idea - it makes code hard to read, and hard to use. Instead, return a value from your function and use that to do something. If you need to have data accessible from a range of functions, consider making a class.

It's also worth noting that CAPITALS is generaly reserved for constants, so it's a bad idea to name your variables like this. For normal variables, lowercase_with_underscores is preferred.

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