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I'm looking to use a LEFT JOIN query to acquire some results from two tables with a one-to-many relationship, but limit the result set based on the count of "children". I have two tables structured like:

customers
id    name    ...
1     "bob"   ...
2     "jill"  ...

orders
id    customer_id    ...
100   1              ...
101   2              ...
102   1              ...

(The rest of the data in the tables is irrelevant for this query.)

What I'd like to do is acquire all customer IDs and their order IDs, sorted by customer, but limited to customers that have placed more than one order. In this example, the results would look like:

cust_id    order_id
1          100
1          102

I've started with a basic LEFT JOIN to pair order IDs with their customer, but can't figure out how to leave out all customers that haven't ordered at least twice.

SELECT 
    `customers`.`id` AS `cust_id`,
    `orders`.`id` AS `order_id`
FROM
    `customers`
LEFT JOIN `orders` ON
    `customers`.`id` = `orders`.`customer_id`
ORDER BY
    `cust_id`

Thanks all.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

One way is to create an inline view that gets the customers that have more than one order and the inner join to it. You could also do an IN or EXISTS if you don't like the JOIN

SELECT 
    `customers`.`id` AS `cust_id`,
    `orders`.`id` AS `order_id`
FROM
    `customers`
LEFT JOIN `orders` ON
    `customers`.`id` = `orders`.`customer_id`
INNER JOIN 
      (SELECT `customer_id `    
       FROM `orders`
       GROUP BY `customer_id`    
       HAVING COUNT(id) > 1) as `morethanone`
On
    `customer`.`id`  = `morethanone`.`custmor_id`
ORDER BY
    `cust_id`
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Taking my answers before I say them! –  Andrew Willis May 8 '12 at 22:08
    
Thanks! This seems to be giving me the result set I was looking for. –  inspector-g May 8 '12 at 22:47
    
Glad I could help, but you should note that Marlin Pierce was correct that the LEFT JOIN doesn't really do anything since we've eliminated any customer that didn't have any orders. –  Conrad Frix May 9 '12 at 14:56

Heh, guess I'm a little slow, but I'll post my answer anyway. It is slightly different, but still works.

SELECT `customers`.`id` AS `cust_id` , count( orders.id ) AS count_orders
FROM `customers`
JOIN `orders` ON `customers`.`id` = `orders`.`customer_id`
GROUP BY customers.id
HAVING count( orders.id ) >1
ORDER BY `cust_id`
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First, you won't need the join to be left outer, because the only difference between that and an inner join will be including customers who have no orders, and you won't need them in the results because they have fewer than two orders.

SELECT customers.id AS `cust_id`, orders.id AS `order_id`
FROM customers
     INNER JOIN orders ON `customers`.`id` = `orders`.`customer_id`
     INNER JOIN orders count_orders ON customers.id = count_orders.customer_id
GROUP BY count_orders.id, orders.id
HAVING count(count_orders.id) >= 2
ORDER BY `cust_id`
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This comes close... Conrad Frix's answer appears to give the proper result set, and yours gives the same number of rows; however, the order IDs "under" each customer ID are duplicated. For example, instead of "1, 100; 1, 102" it gives "1, 100; 1, 100" (to extend the example in my question). –  inspector-g May 8 '12 at 22:49
1  
answer edited with the fix. SQL really takes trying and tweaking, so that's the problem with off the cuff SQL answers. –  Marlin Pierce May 8 '12 at 23:19
    
+1 Interesting solution. I've never seen anyone solve this problem by creating a cartesian square allowing you to count and group by the same field –  Conrad Frix May 9 '12 at 15:04
    
Joining a table multiple times in a FROM clause is a common SQL technique. –  Marlin Pierce May 9 '12 at 15:25
    
@MarlinPierce hmm joining a table multiple times yes. Doing it to create a Cartesian Product so you can group and count... I can't remember seeing (and variations of this particular question comes up a lot) –  Conrad Frix May 9 '12 at 19:18

If you're excluding customers who haven't ordered, then the LEFT JOIN is unnecessary, no?

Since you want the order IDs in the result set, the COUNT query will need to be run first.

In SQL Server, 2005+, a CTE will do the trick for the count query, and then the result set you want can be produced based on that count query:

WITH customerWithMoreThanOneOrder AS
(
    SELECT 
        `customers`.`id` AS `cust_id`
    FROM
        `customers`
    INNER JOIN `orders` ON
        `customers`.`id` = `orders`.`customer_id`
    GROUP BY 
        `customers`.`id`
    HAVING COUNT(0) > 1
)

SELECT 
    `customers`.`id` AS `cust_id`,
    `orders`.`id` AS `order_id`
FROM
    `customers`
INNER JOIN `orders` ON
    `customers`.`id` = `orders`.`customer_id`
WHERE `customers`.`id` IN (SELECT cust_id FROM customerWithMoreThanOneOrder)
ORDER BY
    `cust_id`

If the database you're using doesn't support this structure, then simply place the count query in the parentheses for the IN subquery, like so:

SELECT 
    `customers`.`id` AS `cust_id`,
    `orders`.`id` AS `order_id`
FROM
    `customers`
INNER JOIN `orders` ON
    `customers`.`id` = `orders`.`customer_id`
WHERE `customers`.`id` IN (SELECT 
                               `customers`.`id` AS `cust_id`
                           FROM
                               `customers`
                           INNER JOIN `orders` ON
                               `customers`.`id` = `orders`.`customer_id`
                           GROUP BY 
                               `customers`.`id`
                           HAVING COUNT(0) > 1)
ORDER BY
    `cust_id`

Let me know if you have any questions

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This is for MySQL, so I can't comment on whether the first suggestion would work. However, the second suggestion appears to send the mysqld process into an infinite loop. The query seems logical to me, so it may be an issue with MySQL itself. Their releases have been getting buggier and buggier lately... –  inspector-g May 8 '12 at 22:48

An alternative to the other answers, you could using an IN clause.

SELECT 
    `customers`.`id` AS `cust_id`,
    `orders`.`id` AS `order_id`
FROM
    `customers`
LEFT JOIN `orders` ON
    `customers`.`id` = `orders`.`customer_id`
WHERE `customer_id` IN (SELECT `customer_id` FROM `orders` GROUP BY `customer_id` HAVING COUNT(*) > 1)
ORDER BY
    `cust_id`
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