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I am getting started with SignalR, and it works great once everything is configured. However, almost all the applications that I work on use Castle Windsor, so it would be great to be able to use them together. The reason that I want to do this is so that I can use Castle dependencies/services inside of a persistent connection.

I dug around in the source code, and it looks like I could either replace DependencyResolver with a Castle based one (i.e., Castle implementing IDependencyResolver), or I could change the usage of DependencyResolver to Castle.

Which one of these is a better idea? Is there another approach that I could use to combine Castle and SignalR?

Thanks, Erick

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I went with the first option of setting our own DependencyResolver

AspNetHost.SetResolver(new SignalResolver(_container));

I can provide SignalResolver if desired but leaving out for readability for now.

Another important note is that the hubs must have an empty constructor so our castle container injects through properties, e.g.

public class NotificationHub : Hub, INotificationHub
    { 

public INotificationService NotificationService { get; set; }

and the resolver requested

public class SignalResolver : DefaultDependencyResolver
    {
        private readonly IWindsorContainer _container;

        public SignalResolver(IWindsorContainer container) 
        {
            if (container == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException("container");
            }
            _container = container;
        }

        public override object GetService(Type serviceType) 
        {
            return TryGet(serviceType) ?? base.GetService(serviceType);
        }

        public override IEnumerable<object> GetServices(Type serviceType)
        {
            return TryGetAll(serviceType).Concat(base.GetServices(serviceType));
        }

        private object TryGet(Type serviceType)
        {
            try
            {
                return _container.Resolve(serviceType);
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                return null;
            }
        }

        private IEnumerable<object> TryGetAll(Type serviceType)
        {
            try
            {
                var array = _container.ResolveAll(serviceType);
                return array.Cast<object>().ToList();
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                return null;
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I am going to go with something similar, but I'm finding some challenges in combining the way that Castle and SignalR manage lifestyles. For some reason my PersistentConnections keep getting messed up. It's good to hear that someone was able to do it! I will keep chugging along (unless your solution allowed for persistent connections from the Windsor container?) –  Erick T May 12 '12 at 7:34
    
what version of IIS are you running? what kind of lifestyle issues do you have, singleton? It would be interesting to figure out how Castle would do a per web request lifestyle for a persistant connection. It might be best to keep things transient. –  dove May 12 '12 at 13:33
    
Can you include SignalResolver? –  rball Jul 10 '12 at 2:59
    
@rball bit late, but there's the resolver you asked for –  dove Oct 2 '12 at 11:29
    
@dove where, the one I found in my answer? –  rball Oct 3 '12 at 17:19

Here's what I ended up doing. First I followed along with the Windsor wiki to get my ASP.NET MVC3 setup. My Global.asax.cs:

private static IWindsorContainer _container;

    protected void Application_Start()
    {
        BootstrapContainer();
        RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);
        AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();
        RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);
    }

    protected void Application_End()
    {
        _container.Dispose();
    }

    private static void BootstrapContainer()
    {
        _container = new WindsorContainer().Install(FromAssembly.This());
        RouteTable.Routes.MapHubs(new CastleWindsorDependencyResolver(_container));
        var controllerFactory = new WindsorControllerFactory(_container.Kernel);
        ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(controllerFactory);
    }
    ...

CastleWindsorDependencyResolver came from here

Copied:

public class CastleWindsorDependencyResolver : DefaultDependencyResolver
{
    private readonly IWindsorContainer _container;

    public CastleWindsorDependencyResolver(IWindsorContainer container)
    {
        if (container == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("container");
        }

        _container = container;

        // perform the lazy registrations
        foreach (var c in _lazyRegistrations)
            _container.Register(c);

        _lazyRegistrations.Clear();
    }

    public override object GetService(Type serviceType)
    {
        if (_container.Kernel.HasComponent(serviceType))
            return _container.Resolve(serviceType);
        return base.GetService(serviceType);
    }

    public override IEnumerable<object> GetServices(Type serviceType)
    {
        IEnumerable<object> objects;
        if (_container.Kernel.HasComponent(serviceType))
            objects = _container.ResolveAll(serviceType).Cast<object>();
        else
            objects = new object[] { };

        var originalContainerServices = base.GetServices(serviceType);
        if (originalContainerServices != null)
            return objects.Concat(originalContainerServices);

        return objects;
    }

    public override void Register(Type serviceType, Func<object> activator)
    {
        if (_container != null)
            // cannot unregister components in windsor, so we use a trick
            _container.Register(Component.For(serviceType).UsingFactoryMethod<object>(activator, true).OverridesExistingRegistration());
        else
            // lazy registration for when the container is up
            _lazyRegistrations.Add(Component.For(serviceType).UsingFactoryMethod<object>(activator));

        // register the factory method in the default container too
        //base.Register(serviceType, activator);
    }

    // a form of laxy initialization is actually needed because the DefaultDependencyResolver starts initializing itself immediately
    // while we now want to store everything inside CastleWindsor, so the actual registration step have to be postponed until the
    // container is available
    private List<ComponentRegistration<object>> _lazyRegistrations = new List<ComponentRegistration<object>>();
}

public static class WindsorTrickyExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Overrideses the existing registration:
    /// to overide an existiong component registration you need to do two things:
    /// 1- give it a name.
    /// 2- set it as default.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="componentRegistration">The component registration.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static ComponentRegistration<T> OverridesExistingRegistration<T>(this ComponentRegistration<T> componentRegistration) where T : class
    {
        return componentRegistration
        .Named(Guid.NewGuid().ToString())
        .IsDefault();
    }
}

I wasn't sure WTF the HubsInstaller was trying to do from that same project but I made my own which seems to work fine (I am of course open to any suggestions why this could suck):

public class HubsInstallers : IWindsorInstaller
{
    public void Install(IWindsorContainer container, IConfigurationStore store)
    {
        container.Register(Classes.FromThisAssembly()
                            .BasedOn<IHub>()
                            .LifestyleTransient());
    }
}

Also this is for the newer SignalR versions 0.5+

share|improve this answer
    
I made mine singleton, but guess that depends on what your hubs are doing. –  dove Oct 2 '12 at 11:32
    
Care to share the code? What are the pro's and con's of doing it this way? –  rball Oct 3 '12 at 17:19
    
used LifestyleSingleton instead of transient, that's all i meant about that comment. anything else you meant? –  dove Oct 3 '12 at 18:10
    
Well I don't know if I grok the reasons why to really even use LifestyleTransient other than it worked. Just wondering what the differences were. –  rball Oct 5 '12 at 15:06

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