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I'm writing a program which converts decimal numbers, characters, strings to binary numbers and works with them. But I got stuck because I want to divide Bin by Bin. something like this:

  11010110110000
/ 10011
  --------------
= 01001110110000 

so the new number will be 1001110110000 / 10011... until the very last result.

Here is my code:

import Data.Char (ord)
import Data.List

toBinary :: Int -> [Int]
toBinary 0 = []
toBinary x = reverse (kisegf x)

kisegf 0 = []
kisegf x | x `mod` 2 == 1 = 1 : kisegf (x `div` 2)
         | x `mod` 2 == 0 = 0 : kisegf (x `div` 2)

chrToBinary :: Char -> [Int]    
chrToBinary x 
                |length (toBinary (ord x)) == 8 = (toBinary (ord x)) 
                |otherwise = take (8-(length (toBinary (ord x))))[0,0..] ++ (toBinary (ord x))

strToBinary :: String -> [Int]
strToBinary [] = []
strToBinary (x:xs) = [l | l <- chrToBinary x] ++ strToBinary xs

bxor :: [Int] -> [Int] -> [Int]
bxor [] [] = []
bxor (x:xs) (y:ys)
            |length (x:xs) == length (y:ys) && (x /= y) = 1 : bxor xs ys
            |length (x:xs) == length (y:ys) && (x == y) = 0 : bxor xs ys
            |length (x:xs) < length (y:ys) && (x /= y) = 1 : bxor (take (length (y:ys)-(length (x:xs)))[0,0..] ++ xs) ys
            |length (x:xs) < length (y:ys) && (x == y) = 0 : bxor (take (length (y:ys)-(length (x:xs)))[0,0..] ++ xs) ys
            |length (x:xs) > length (y:ys) && (x /= y) = 1 : bxor xs (take (length (x:xs)-(length (y:ys)))[0,0..] ++ ys)
            |length (x:xs) > length (y:ys) && (x == y) = 0 : bxor xs (take (length (x:xs)-(length (y:ys)))[0,0..] ++ ys)
{-this will compare 2 bin if a bigger than true else false-}
(%>=%) :: [Int] -> [Int] -> Bool
(%>=%)[] [] = True
(%>=%)[] _ = False
(%>=%)_ [] = True
(%>=%) (x:xs) (y:ys) = x==1 && y==1 && elemIndex 1 (x:xs) == elemIndex 1 (y:ys)

bmod :: [Int]{-number-} -> [Int]{-div-} -> [Int]{-result-}
bmod (x:xs) (y:ys)
            |length(x:xs) >= length(y:ys) && (take (length (y:ys)) (x:xs)) %>=% (y:ys) = ???
            |length(x:xs) >= length(y:ys) = ???
            |otherwise = (x:xs)

what should i write in the place of "???"

another and bigger for example:

Példa: bmod 11010110110000 10011.

       _______________
10011 ) 11010110110000
        10011,,.,,....
        -----,,.,,....
         10011,.,,....
         10011,.,,....
         -----,.,,....
          00001.,,....
          00000.,,....
          -----.,,....
           00010,,....
           00000,,....
           -----,,....
            00101,....
            00000,....
            -----,....
             01011....
             00000....
             -----....
              10110...
              10011...
              -----...
               01010..
               00000..
               -----..
                10100.
                10011.
                -----.
                 01110  
                 10011  <- bigger so cant div again
                 -----
                  1110 = what i want
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2 Answers 2

your function as written isn't what you want.

bmod xs ys | not (xs %>=% ys) = xs
           | otherwise = ????

will probably work better. In the ????, you want to take successive amounts of digits from the beginning of xs until you find a prefix of xs is greater than ys, then recurse with

bmod ((xsPrefix %-% ys)++xsSuffix) ys

For getting the prefix of xs, inits combined with filter is pretty much what you need. Obviously, there are also some more binary functions you will need to implement.

The issue with your design is that there is nothing for you to recurse to in the second case -- you want to end up using the code from your first case somehow, but there isn't an easy way to do that short of copying the code.

Also, your kisegf function could be cleaned up a bit - why not

kisegf 0 = []
kisegf x = (x `mod` 2) : kisegf (x `div` 2)
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Although not an answer to your question, I would keep the bit strings LSB first, rather than MSB first (i.e. don't reverse in toBinary). In this way, the list index corresponds to the bit significance, so you don't have to worry about adding leading zeros to align operands. For instance, the bxor function becomes much simpler:

bxor [] bs = bs
bxor as [] = as
bxor (a:as) (b:bs) = (a `xor` b) : bxor as bs where
  a `xor` b | a /= b    = 1
            | otherwise = 0

Having the bits in this order will also make addition/subtraction simpler, since carries propagate from the LSB to the MSB:

badd :: [Int] {- a -} -> [Int] {- b -} -> Int {- carry-in -} -> [Int]
badd []     []     0 = []  -- no carry-out
badd []     []     1 = [1] -- carry-out
badd []     (b:bs) c = s : badd [] bs c' where (c', s) = add 0 b c -- zero-extend as
badd (a:as) []     c = s : badd as [] c' where (c', s) = add a 0 c -- zero-extend bs
badd (a:as) (b:bs) c = s : badd as bs c' where (c', s) = add a b c

add a b c = (s `div` 2, s `mod` 2) where s = a+b+c

Left and right shifts are also simpler since they affect LSBs:

as `rsh` n = drop n as
as `lsh` n = replicate n 0 ++ as

For signed numbers, you implicitly assume that the last bit repeats indefinitely.

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