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I have a simple question. I designed a C# class where I got some property getters who are responsible for doing some performance expensive tasks. I have many properties like that in my class. My question, are those property getters are evaluated as soon as the the instance of the class is loaded into the memory ? If so, then, I will consider breaking them into methods. I hope they evaluated only when the property is used for the first time, but I need to be sure about it about this assumption.

I know I should use methods for expensive tasks, but I just found using Properties are more maintainable where I have many many members in a class.

Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Property getters/setters are evaluated for every call to/from them. They are nothing more than syntactic for methods.

public class Foo
{
   private int actual = 0;
   public int Bar
   {
      get { return actual++; }
      set { value = actual; value++ }
   }
}

int v = foo.Bar; //0
v = foo.Bar; // 1
v = foo.Bar; // 2
foo.Bar = v; // actual = 3
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Hi, thanks for the clarification. Now I got it. –  Emran Hussain May 9 '12 at 0:42

Property getters are not for instantiation, since getters/setters only run when you call the property. Use the constructor for instantiating properties. The exception to this rule is lazy initialization, when a (usually readonly) property's value is initialized the first time it is accessed.

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No, they will not be evaluated when the class is instantiated. They will only be evaluated when they are accessed (and every time thereafter). This allows you to implementat "lazy-loading". It may be wise (depending on your situation) to save the result in a private field after evaluating once, and returning that result for every subsequent call.

private string foo;
public string Foo
{
  get
  { 
    if (foo == null)
      foo = "expensive operation";
    return foo;
  }
}
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Thank you for the idea. I think, we need to be careful with singleton pattern if we do not want to keep the memory occupied with the return value. unless the return value object is a heavy object, I usually follow this pattern. –  Emran Hussain May 9 '12 at 0:46

Getters/setters are evaluated when you do call them. Consider this:

    private string sample;
    public  string Sample
    {
        get
        {
            return (sample = sample ?? SomeExpensiveMethod());
        }
    }

This way you can control when to call your expensive method.

Also consider static properties are populated only once in your application lifetime. So that can also be a choice, depending on your scenario.

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hi, thank you for your answer, it will help. –  Emran Hussain May 9 '12 at 0:47

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