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Reading through Apple's docs here, the example code declares the primitive accessor and mutator as separate methods in a category. Is it possible to use @property to declare the primitives? Is there a disadvantage to do it this way; it seems like it saves boiler plate code, but are there performance implications in the way the methods are generated when declared this way? What are the optional attributes - (strong, nonatomic)?

Apple's Example Code

@interface Department : NSManagedObject

@property(nonatomic, retain) NSString *name;

@end

@interface Department (PrimitiveAccessors)
- (NSString *)primitiveName;
- (void)setPrimitiveName:(NSString *)newName;
@end

Suggested Change

@interface Department : NSManagedObject

@property(nonatomic, retain) NSString *name;

@end

@interface Department (PrimitiveAccessors)

@property (strong, nonatomic) NSString *primitiveName;

@end
share|improve this question

You should generate classes for your Core Data entities automatically. You do this by pressing the Editor menu and selecting "Create NSManagedObject subclass". This will automatically create a class for each of your entities, and those will have the properties you want.

If you want to customize these classes I strongly recommend that you do it in a category. I recommend this because, you may want to go back to your datamodel and add or remove an attribute, and thus you will have to generate new subclasses. In that event, any changes you may've made to the subclasses will be overwritten and that can be painful :)

share|improve this answer
    
I prefer to use mogenerator for this work. – thom_ek May 9 '12 at 9:33
    
Me too, untill the new version of Xcode that does these things out of the box! :) – Rasmus Taulborg Hummelmose May 9 '12 at 9:40

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