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First, I set Timeout Requests after (seconds) to 20 in CF Admin.

Then I run a cfm with a line like while(true);

The page will run way past 20 seconds, and the thread is still alive as I wrote this.

Below is a snapshot taken with Server Monitor

Thread  jrpp-3 request type - TEMPLATE REQUEST
*Template Path - D:\Projects\infiniteLoop.cfm
*Request Parameters - {}
*Request Method - GET
*Client IP address - 127.0.0.1
*Thread elapsed time - 322659 milliseconds

Is this normal?? This is CF9.0.1., developer edition. Multi-instance setup, with JRun.

The only way to stop the infinite loop is to restart CF.

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2  
Henry... what are you doing inside of the infinite loop. There are some things that preempt the global timeout (db calls, ftp, things that require outside resources). –  Mark A Kruger May 9 '12 at 2:56
    
Guys... this question doesn't make any mention of CFTHREAD... not sure where that is coming from. –  Mark A Kruger May 9 '12 at 13:20
    
@MarkAKruger I'm in the process of implementing something new. The codes are still unstable. I wrote it in CFScript and didn't expect the codes that end up being executed infinitely not get killed by CF's Request Timeout. –  Henry May 9 '12 at 15:30
1  
Well I think Barny's answer is probably definitive. I'm asking a few Adobe folks about it but the consensus seems to be that yes - loops inside of cfscript don't respond to global timeout values. If you rewrite your loop in tag format I'm guessing you would get the timeout you expect. Remember though native calls (file I/O, DB etc) will still be subject to this issue. –  Mark A Kruger May 9 '12 at 15:59
1  
Just had a thought on this issue, wouldn't it be troublesome for CF share hosting? –  Henry May 10 '12 at 2:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Request timeouts in ColdFuison don't behave in the way you expect. They way it's presented you'd imagine that there's a watchdog which checks how long your request has been running and kills it on or shortly after the request timeout. What actually appears to happen is that only when certain tags are run does CF check whether the elapsed time of the request is over the set limit. <cfoutput> is one of the tags where it checks, which is why you often see the timeout exceeded message pointing to a cfoutput, even though you know it can't be taking long to execute.

<cfsetting requesttimeout="5" enableCFoutputOnly="no" />

<!--- Looping with a condition <cfloop blamed --->
<cfset request.counter=0 />
<cfloop condition="true">
    <cfset sleep(1000) />
    <cfset request.counter=request.counter+1>

    <cflog file="timeout" text="#request.counter#">

    <cfif request.counter GT 8>
        <cfbreak>
    </cfif>

</cfloop>

<!--- Looping with an index, times out, naming CFLOOP as the offending tag --->
<cfloop index="foo" from="1" to="8">
    <cfset sleep(1000) />
</cfloop>

<!--- Looping with an index, times out, naming CFOUTPUT as the offending tag --->
<cfloop index="foo" from="1" to="8">
    <cfset sleep(1000) />
    <cfoutput>Hello</cfoutput>
</cfloop>


<!--- Same loop, but in script. No timeout warning at all --->
<cfscript>
for(foo=1;foo<=8;foo++){
    sleep(1000);
}
</cfscript>

<!--- Same loop, now with WriteOutput() called. Still no timeout --->
<cfscript>
for(foo=1;foo<=8;foo++){
    sleep(1000);
    writeoutput("tick...");
}
</cfscript>

The code above shows some of the odd behaviour of the requesttimeout. As Mark Kruger pointed out, any call to an external resource will mean no checking for timeout, and its my guess that large blocks of script which are just executing your own logic will also not be checked, leaving the next output statement to be blamed.

If you need to trace where code is lagging and the timeout messages are pointing to the wrong place, I'd either use logging or jstack to grab stack traces from the server whilst the long-running code is running. Grab a few stack traces a few seconds apart, then run the log file through Samurai to find what the code is doing.

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1  
Barny - that is an awesome answer. I love it. Thanks for the examples. Looks like a good choice for a blog post and some further investigation. –  Mark A Kruger May 9 '12 at 13:32
    
I'd plus for the answer, just for recommending Samurai. (But overall a great answer too!) –  Sharondio May 9 '12 at 14:08
    
Thank you very much for your investigation! Very interesting / odd result. Who would have thought, same loop, but in cfscript, would not be checked against the request timeout. This should either be corrected, or documented somewhere... Are you using CF 9.0.1 as well? Maybe we should test it against CF7 or 8 to see if it's indeed the same result. –  Henry May 9 '12 at 15:22
1  
@barnyr your investigation lead me to think.. if I call my cfscript in a strategic way, I can still get the Request Timeout behaviour. –  Henry May 9 '12 at 15:37
1  
@Henry ColdFusion checks for request timeout before "executing" a limited number of tags. cfoutput is one of those tags, and the reason why most timeout errors report cfoutput as the culprit. So if you have a function that only has a cfoutput in it, then you will just be getting CF to check if the request timeout has expired, with little other overhead. Having it inside the loop will make the loop respect the request timeout. –  nosilleg Jul 24 '12 at 18:15

I'm finding the same thing as Henry. Here's my test code:

Before thread<br />
<cfthread action="run" name="t1">
    <cfloop condition="true">
        <cfparam name="count" default="0">
        <cfset sleep(3000)>
        <cflog file="cfthreadTest" text="Log entry #++count#">
    </cfloop>
</cfthread>
After thread<br />

My request timeout is set to 20sec in CFAdmin, and this thread has now been running for 15min. That said, a thread is not "a request" so am not sure I would expect it to respect the request timeout. There's nothing documented that I can find that suggests it should respect the request timeout. That said... having some way of killing a thread would be "handy".

I guess this is only an "answer" in the context that I don't think your expectations are correct in that you expect it to respect the request timeout.

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Thx for the answer, but I shouldn't have include the word 'thread' in the title, as I didn't use cfthread at all. Question updated. –  Henry May 9 '12 at 15:18
    
OK, well in that case one can't go past @barnyr's answer. –  Adam Cameron May 10 '12 at 8:00

What you have described is unfortunately expected behaviour when you know the constraints of request timeout checking in ColdFusion. (Granted, it shouldn't be the expected behaviour.)

There is an long blog post by Charlie Arehart covering timeout issues. One section is titled "CF checks the time at the start of the next operation, but sadly only on SOME tags". Unfortunately cfscript is not one of those, and timeout will not be checked with pure script code. However, one of the tags that does trigger a timeout check is cfoutput and with that knowledge it's possible to make script based code respect request timeout. It is however a manual process in that you need to decide yourself where you should be checking for timeout.

<cffunction name="cf_checkRequestTimeout" access="public" output="false" returntype="void" hint="Force CF to check if the request has timed out.">

    <!--- CF checks Request timeout on cfoutput tag use.  --->
    <cfoutput></cfoutput>

</cffunction>

<cfscript>
    for(foo=1;foo<=61;foo++){
        sleep(1000);
        cf_checkRequestTimeout();
    }
</cfscript>

The error generated will blame line 4, which is misleading, but the stacktrace will show that the function was called from line 11, which then allows you to know which bit of code timed out. Obviously the granularity of that knowledge is based on the frequency of checking the timeout.

The cf_checkRequestTimeout (not checkRequestTimeout because that's an undocumented internal CF function) can be called outside of cfscript as well, so if, for example you have a cfquery you think is causing timeout issues then you can put the cf_checkRequestTimeout call after the cfquery and get timeout errors where they should be instead of further down the code execution.

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@Henry Getting the request to timeout, and figuring out what was happening to make the request timeout are two different things. This answer is just about getting the timeout to happen. You say "which invoke was throwing" do you mean which iteration of the loop? You would need to add in some more logic to figure that out. –  nosilleg Aug 1 '12 at 15:49

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