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I'm creating a simple tic tac toe game. I initialized my 3x3 board using a single space character.

private char[][] board;
private char player; // 'X' or 'O'

public TicTacToe() {
 for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
   {
     for(int j = 0; j <3; j++)
     {
       board[i][j] = ' ';
     }
   }
 player = 'X';
 }

I ask the user to enter the coordinates as shown below:

   1  2  3
A |  |  |  |
B |  |  |  |
C |  |  |  |

so if X enters B2 and O enters A3, the board will look like this:

   1  2  3
A |  |  |O |
B |  | X|  |
C |  |  |  |

Right now, I'm trying to code a method that checks to see if a current player's move is valid.

Question: How do I convert the user string input (A=1,B=2,C=3) so that I can see if board[x][y] contains a ' ' character?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use String.charAt(int) to get a character from any point in the string. Note that, like arrays, the first character in a string is index 0, not 1.

You can then convert these to indices, like so:

input = input.toUpperCase(); // Makes code work for all cases
int x = input.charAt(0) - 'A';
int y = input.charAt(1) - '1';
char currentValue = board[x][y];

After that, currentValue will contain the value currently on the game board at that location.

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Do you mind elaborating on what is going on in your second and third line of code? I don't get why you're subtracting 'A' and '1'. –  Huy May 9 '12 at 1:56
3  
It's because arrays start from 0, if the user inputs 1, he actually refers to the 0 cell in the array. same for 'A'. it's the ASCII code. 'A' - 'A' = 0. 'B'-'A' = 1 (if i'm not mistaken, 'A' s code is 49, since it's an int.) –  La bla bla May 9 '12 at 2:01
    
@Lablabla Thank you for the explanation. Makes sense. –  Huy May 9 '12 at 2:03
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you can simply check. since you only have 3 options you could do something like that:

int row = input.charAt(0);
int col = input.charAt(1) - 1;

if(row == 'A')
    row = 0;
else if(row == 'B')
    row = 1;
else if(row == 'C')
    row = 2;

now you can get the coordinated

if(board[row][col]).equals("X") {
....
}
else if(board[row][col]).equals("O") {
...
}
else {
...
}
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I like Jake King's solution, it is very short and elegant, but in my preference, it is not "debuggable by looking"

I would have done something like this, which in my personal opinion is more explicit

    Map<Character, Integer> rowMap = new HashMap<Character, Integer>();
    rowMap.put('A', 0);
    rowMap.put('B', 1);
    rowMap.put('C', 3);

    // Validations of input come here first...

    int row = rowMap.get(input.charAt(0));
    int col = Character.getNumericValue(input.charAt(1))-1;

    char place = board[row][col]; 

    if(place!=' '){
        throw new RuntimeException("Place is not empty");
    }
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