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I want my application to check if another version of itself is already running.

For example, demo.jar started, user clicks to run it again, but the second instance realizes "oh wait, there is already a demo.jar running." and quits with a message.

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11 Answers 11

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you are looking for can probably best be accomplished with a lock file. By lock file I simply mean a file that will have a predefined location and whose existence is your mutex.

Test if that file exists when your program starts, if it does, exit immediately. Create a file in a known location. If your program exits normally, delete the lock file.

Probably best is if you can also populate the file with a pid (process id) so that you can detect abnormal exits that didn't delete the file but this get OS specific.

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1  
just an addendum : I have not tried the pid thing which is safer if the system has PID available. I have tried this earlier, but found a little problem (just a false-positive). Now this may be machine-specific. So, when my program closes, it would delete the file. The file did not get deleted immediately (due to buffering or whatever) and when I ran the program again quickly, it would find the file (even when it is deleted) –  Ankit May 9 '12 at 2:30
    
I did not think of this, great idea thanks :) –  Epicblood May 9 '12 at 2:53
    
You'll probably want to give the user a way to remove the lock file, just in case the application crashes and doesn't delete it automatically. –  MadcoreTom May 9 '12 at 5:24
    
will do, is there anyway to make the file auto delete upon reboot? –  Epicblood May 9 '12 at 5:42
    
@JorisBolsens put the file in the systems tmp directory. I know this clears on reboot for linux and I think there is a similar location for Windows. –  Andrew White May 9 '12 at 12:28

Simple yet powerful tested solution.

    static File file;
    static FileChannel fileChannel;
    static FileLock lock;
    static boolean running = false;

    @SuppressWarnings("resource")
    public static boolean checkIfAlreadyRunning() throws IOException {
        file = new File(FilePath.FILEPATH + "az-client.lock");
        if (!file.exists()) {
            file.createNewFile();
            running = true;
        } else {
            file.delete();
        }

        fileChannel = new RandomAccessFile(file, "rw").getChannel();
        lock = fileChannel.tryLock();

        if (lock == null) {
            fileChannel.close();
            return true;
        }
        ShutdownHook shutdownHook = new ShutdownHook();
        Runtime.getRuntime().addShutdownHook(shutdownHook);

        return running;
    }

    public static void unlockFile() {
        try {
            if (lock != null)
                lock.release();
            fileChannel.close();
            file.delete();
            running = false;
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    static class ShutdownHook extends Thread {
        public void run() {
            unlockFile();
        }
    }

Put these methods in some Util class and before launching your main class just check that if already exists then show some dialog to user otherwise launch an application. It works even if you abnormally shutdown java process or what ever you do. It is robust and efficient, no need to set up DataGram listeners or whatever...

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Please don't forget to Vote Up +1 if it helps :-) –  AZ_ Nov 16 '13 at 7:06
    
your FilePath.FILEPATH is not from JDK, I don't have Jenkins available in my project. This statement, file = new File(FilePath.FILEPATH + "az-client.lock");, should be changed to apply to my case. Could you please tell me how? –  5YrsLaterDBA Jul 29 '14 at 14:02
    
what? I didn't understand question –  AZ_ Aug 11 '14 at 9:15

If your application is running on Windows, you can call CreateMutex through JNI.

jboolean ret = FALSE;    
HANDLE hMutex = CreateMutex(NULL, FALSE, mutexName); 
ret = TRUE;    
if(WAIT_TIMEOUT == WaitForSingleObject(hMutex, 10))  
{    
    ret = FALSE;  
}
else if(GetLastError() != 0)  
{    
    ret = FALSE;  
}

This returns true if nobody else is using this mutex, false otherwise. You could provide "myApplication" as a mutex name or "Global\MyApplication" if you want your mutex to be shared by all Windows sessions.

Edit: It's not as complicated as it looks :) and I find it clean.

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I'd like to be able to use on mac and linux as well, but this does help xD –  Epicblood May 9 '12 at 2:51

The strategy of this code is to keep the PID around from the last run in the registry, if that PID is found running on the system, don't start. If you finish, reset.

The preferences are stored on Windows Registry in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\JavaSoft\Prefs

import java.io.*;
import java.util.prefs.Preferences;
public class JavaApplication3 {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        if(isRunning()){
            System.out.println("Two instances of this program cannot " +
                    "be running at the same time.  Exiting now");
        }
        else{
            onStart();
            epicHeavyWorkGoesHere();
            onFinish();
        }
    }
    public static void epicHeavyWorkGoesHere(){
        try {
            Thread.sleep(15000);
        } catch (InterruptedException ex) {}
    }
    public static void onStart(){
        Preferences prefs = Preferences.systemRoot().node("JavaApplication3");
        prefs.put("RUNNINGPID", getCurrentPID());
    }
    public static void onFinish(){
        Preferences prefs = Preferences.systemRoot().node("JavaApplication3");
        prefs.put("RUNNINGPID", "");
    }
    public static boolean isRunning(){
        Preferences prefs = Preferences.systemRoot().node("JavaApplication3");

        if (prefs.get("RUNNINGPID", null) == null || prefs.get("RUNNINGPID", null).equals(""))
            return false;

        if (isProcessIdRunningOnWindows(Integer.parseInt(prefs.get("RUNNINGPID", null))))
            return true;
        return false;
    }
    public static String getCurrentPID(){
        //This function should work with Windows, Linux and Mac but you'll have to 
        //test to make sure.  If not then get a suitable getCurrentPID function replacement.
        try{
            java.lang.management.RuntimeMXBean runtime = java.lang.management.ManagementFactory.getRuntimeMXBean();
            java.lang.reflect.Field jvm = runtime.getClass().getDeclaredField("jvm");
            jvm.setAccessible(true);
            sun.management.VMManagement mgmt = (sun.management.VMManagement) jvm.get(runtime);
            java.lang.reflect.Method pid_method = mgmt.getClass().getDeclaredMethod("getProcessId");
            pid_method.setAccessible(true);
            return pid_method.invoke(mgmt) + "";
        }
        catch(Exception e){
            throw new RuntimeException("Cannot get the current PID");
        }
    }
    public static boolean isProcessIdRunningOnWindows(int pid){
        //This Function only works for windows, if you want it to work on linux
        //or mac, you will have to go find a replacement method that 
        //takes the processID as a parameter and spits out a true/false 
        //if it is running on the operating system.
        try {
            Runtime runtime = Runtime.getRuntime();
            String cmds[] = {"cmd", "/c", "tasklist /FI \"PID eq " + pid + "\""};
            Process proc = runtime.exec(cmds);

            InputStream inputstream = proc.getInputStream();
            InputStreamReader inputstreamreader = new InputStreamReader(inputstream);
            BufferedReader bufferedreader = new BufferedReader(inputstreamreader);
            String line;
            while ((line = bufferedreader.readLine()) != null) {
                if (line.contains(" " + pid + " ")){
                    return true;
                }
            }
            return false;
        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            throw new RuntimeException("Cannot run the tasklist command to query if a pid is running or not");
        }
    }
}

If the program is hung and the pid remains in the task list this will be blocked. You could add an additional registry key that will store the last successful run time, and if the run time becomes too great, the stored PID is killed, and the program re-run.

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1) How this would find out if the program hangs? If a previous program hangs, both the PID in registry and the process in the tasklist still remains. You could not distinguish between a running process or a hanged process. 2) I could just scan the tasklist to find the process(may be running or hanged). What more could you achieve by saving the PID in registry? –  Lai Aug 8 '13 at 1:04
    
Ah, good catch. I meant to add another key which stores the last successful completion time. Also keep a variable for "max amount of time allowed to run". When the program starts, the time the PID runtime can be calculated and killed if it runs too long. –  Eric Leschinski Aug 8 '13 at 3:20

Enforce one instance of a program running with a ServerSocket Lock

Java Code. Put this into a file called Main.java:

import java.net.*;
import java.io.*;
public class Main{
  public static void main(String args[]){
    ServerSocket socket = null;
    try {
      socket = new ServerSocket(34567);
      System.out.println("Doing hard work for 100 seconds");
      try{ Thread.sleep(100000); } catch(Exception e){ }
      socket.close();
    }
    catch (IOException ex) {
      System.out.println("App already running, exiting...");
    }
    finally {
      if (socket != null)
          try{ socket.close(); } catch(Exception e){}
    }
  }
}

Compile and run it

javac Main.java
java Main

Test it in a normal case:

Run the program. You have 100 seconds to run the program again in another terminal, it will fall through saying its already running. Then wait 100 seconds, it should allow you to run it in the 2nd terminal.

Test it after force halting the program with a kill -9

  1. Start the program in terminal 1.
  2. kill -9 that process from another terminal within 100 seconds.
  3. Run the program again, it is allowed to run.

Conclusion:

The socket occupation is cleaned up by the operating system when your program is no longer operating. So you can be sure that the program will not run twice.

Drawbacks

If some sneaky person, or some naughty process were to bind all of the ports, or just your port, then your program will not run because it thinks its already running.

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If you use a Mutex, logically that Mutex would need to be accessible from any JVM which was running a copy of "the program". In C programming, this might be accomplished via shared memory, but Java doesn't have such a thing by default.

With that understanding, there are plenty of ways to implement what you want. You could open a server socket on a designated port (the operating system assures that only one process is the recipient of the server socket, and subsequent opens fail).

You could use a "lock file" but it is a bit complicated, as the file you would need to use would really be a directory (and it becomes heavily dependent on whether directory creation is atomic for your file system, even though most directory creations are). If a sysadmin decides to run you via NFS, then things get even harder (if not impossible).

You can also do a number of nifty tricks with JVMs and debugging / JMI, provided you can somehow assure youself that all relevant JVMs are launched with the same configurations (in time, an impossible task).

Other people have used the exec facility to run the equivalent of a process listing, but it is a bit tricky due to the possibility of race condition (two processes simultaneously check, and fail to see each other).

In the end, the server socket route is probably the most stable, as it is guaranteed to only bind to one process by the TCP/IP stack (and is mediated by the operating system). That said, you will have to flush the socket of incoming messages, and it opens up the possibility of other security issues.

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Contrary to several other answers, the most reliable method is to create a ServerSocket on a fixed port known only to you, way up in the paint cards. It will automatically be released when your application exits, unlike any lock file, and its prior existence via a BindException is a pretty infallible sign that another instance is already running.

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This is also a good solution if your Appication can schedued in task manager with a unique name

 "tasklist /FI \"IMAGENAME eq "+MyApplication+".exe
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Following solution work in two deadly scenerio too. 1> Even your launched exe scheduled as javaw.exe in task manager. 2> You can install your application at two location and from launching both location it also works.

String tempDir = System.getProperty("java.io.tmpdir");// dependent to OS find any tem dir.
        String filePath = tempDir + "lockReserverd.txt";
        try {
            final File file = new File(filePath);

            if(file.exists())
                return false;

            final RandomAccessFile randomAccessFile = new RandomAccessFile(file, "rw");
            final FileLock fileLock = randomAccessFile.getChannel().tryLock();
            if (fileLock != null) {
                Runtime.getRuntime().addShutdownHook(new Thread() {
                    public void run() {
                        try {
                            fileLock.release();
                            randomAccessFile.close();
                            file.delete();
                        } catch (Exception e) {
                            //log.error("Unable to remove lock file: " + lockFile, e);
                        }
                    }
                });
                return true;
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            //log.Error("Unable to create and/or lock file");
        }
        return false

or

This will work if your application.exe is listed in task manager

"tasklist /FI \"IMAGENAME eq "+MyApplication+".exe
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Check PID and file lock technique

We can write the process id of the process that created the lock file into the file. When we encounter an existing lock file, we do not just quit, but we check if the process with that id is still alive. If not, then create a new application instance. I think MongoDB use this technique.

    static File file;
    static FileChannel fileChannel;
    static FileLock lock;
    static boolean running = false;
    static String currentPID = null;
    static String lockFilePID = null;
    public static final String USER_DIR = System.getProperty("user.dir");
    public static final String LOCK_FILE = "az-client.lock";

    public static boolean checkInstance() {
        try {
            file = new File(USER_DIR + File.separator + LOCK_FILE);
            currentPID = Integer.toString(getCurrentPID());
            if (!file.exists()) {
                file.createNewFile();
                writePID(currentPID);
                lockFile();
                addShudDownHook();
                running = true;
                return running;
            } else {
                if (isFileLocked()) {
                    syso("App already running");
                    System.exit(0);
                } else {
                    lockFilePID = getPIDFromLockFile();
                    if (isProcessIdRunningOnWindows(Integer.parseInt(lockFilePID))) {
                        lockFile();
                        addShudDownHook();
                        running = true;
                        return running;
                    } else {
                        file.delete();
                        file.createNewFile();
                        writePID(currentPID);
                        lockFile();
                        addShudDownHook();
                        running = true;
                        return running;
                    }
                }
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            syso(e + "App already running");
            System.exit(0);
        }
        return running;
    }

    /**
     * 
     * @return
     * @throws IOException
     */
    @SuppressWarnings("resource")
    private static boolean isFileLocked() throws IOException {
        fileChannel = new RandomAccessFile(file, "rw").getChannel();
        lock = fileChannel.tryLock();
        if (lock == null) {
            fileChannel.close();
            fileChannel = null;
            return true;
        } else {
            lock.release();
            fileChannel.close();
            fileChannel = null;
        }
        return false;
    }


    public static int getCurrentPID() {
        // This function should work with Windows, Linux and Mac but you'll have
        // to
        // test to make sure. If not then get a suitable getCurrentPID function
        // replacement.
        try {
            java.lang.management.RuntimeMXBean runtime = java.lang.management.ManagementFactory.getRuntimeMXBean();
            java.lang.reflect.Field jvm = runtime.getClass().getDeclaredField("jvm");
            jvm.setAccessible(true);
            sun.management.VMManagement mgmt = (sun.management.VMManagement) jvm.get(runtime);
            java.lang.reflect.Method pid_method = mgmt.getClass().getDeclaredMethod("getProcessId");
            pid_method.setAccessible(true);
            return (int) pid_method.invoke(mgmt);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            throw new RuntimeException("Cannot get the current PID");
        }
    }

    public static boolean isProcessIdRunningOnWindows(int pid) {
        // This Function only works for windows, if you want it to work on linux
        // or mac, you will have to go find a replacement method that
        // takes the processID as a parameter and spits out a true/false
        // if it is running on the operating system.
        try {
            Runtime runtime = Runtime.getRuntime();
            String cmds[] = { "cmd", "/c", "tasklist /FI \"PID eq " + pid + "\"" };
            Process proc = runtime.exec(cmds);

            InputStream inputstream = proc.getInputStream();
            InputStreamReader inputstreamreader = new InputStreamReader(inputstream);
            BufferedReader bufferedreader = new BufferedReader(inputstreamreader);
            String line;
            while ((line = bufferedreader.readLine()) != null) {
                if (line.contains(" " + pid + " ")) {
                    return true;
                }
            }
            return false;
        } catch (Exception ex) {
            throw new RuntimeException("Cannot run the tasklist command to query if a pid is running or not");
        }
    }

    /**
     * This method write PID to Lock file
     * 
     * @param pid
     * @throws Exception
     */
    private static void writePID(String pid) throws Exception {
        try {
            // To Do write PID to LockFile
        } catch (Exception e) {
            syso(e);
            throw e;
        }
    }

    /**
     * This method return PID from Lock File
     * 
     * @return
     * @throws Exception
     */
    private static String getPIDFromLockFile() throws Exception {
        try {
            return //To Do getPID from File
        } catch (Exception e) {
            syso(e);
            throw e;
        }
    }

    private static void addShudDownHook() {
        try {
            ShutdownHook shutdownHook = new ShutdownHook();
            Runtime.getRuntime().addShutdownHook(shutdownHook);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            LogWriter.logger.error(e);
        }
    }

    private static void unlockFile() {
        try {
            if (lock != null) {
                lock.release();
            }
            fileChannel.close();
            file.delete();
            running = false;
        } catch (IOException e) {
            syso(e);
        }
    }

    private static void lockFile() {
        try {
            fileChannel = new RandomAccessFile(file, "rw").getChannel();
            lock = fileChannel.tryLock();
            if (lock == null) {
                fileChannel.close();
                fileChannel = null;
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            syso(e);
        }
    }

    static class ShutdownHook extends Thread {
        public void run() {
            unlockFile();
        }
    }
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FileLock does not work on Linux. Please don't use FileLock. I think getting the Process's Name (by creating a unique name if possible) would be a way to tackle this problem. I think Process ID is auto-assigned.

Refer to this on getting the Process:

http://www.itechp2pexchange.com/content/linux-unix-run-only-one-instance-script

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1  
the java file channel lock doesn't work in linux? reference please? –  rogerdpack Jan 31 '13 at 18:07
    
I gathered it from working at it not from any article anywhere. –  Mukus Feb 1 '13 at 3:23
    
'Any article anywhere' isn't an answer to the question, nor is it any kind of normative reference or authoritative source. Please cite a reliable source that says so, such as an accepted bug report. This is simply not credible. The solution you mention is subjec to a major timing-window problem. -1 –  EJP Nov 16 '13 at 7:22
    
That reference is for running one instance of a script. The only way would be to add create a FileLock and then run two instances with and without the script. That article has it's purpose in that sense. You will see plenty of other stackoverflow answers that have references to other "articles" (your way of putting it). In fact, it is better than copy pasting and making it look your own work. –  Mukus Nov 21 '13 at 4:04
    
@EJP Also I noticed that your Gender answer "stackoverflow.com/questions/4175878/…; had a reference cited as "My father, MD BS FRACP." If that is more appropriate than an "article" somewhere, I will stop using the computer immediately. –  Mukus Nov 21 '13 at 4:08

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