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So, basically I need to find a good way to "flip" a char array used for a sprite in order to make him/it look to the left and vice versa. Here is my array ->

WARRIOR = (

" " +         
 "!!!!!     " +        
 "!!oo! ^   " +
 "!!!!! ^   " +
 "##### ^   " +
 "#######   " +
 "#####     " +
 "** **     ").toCharArray();

The display routine looks like this:

public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
    super.paintComponent(g);
    for (int i = 0; i < WARRIOR.length; i++) {
        int x = (i - 1) % 10;
        int y = (i - 1) / 10;
        if (WARRIOR[i] == '!') {
            g.setColor(new Color(0, 0, 204));
            g.fillRect(x_pos + x * 5, y_pos + y * 5, 5, 5);
        }
        else if (WARRIOR[i] == 'o') {
            g.setColor(new Color(204, 0, 0));
            g.fillRect(x_pos + x * 5, y_pos + y * 5, 5, 5);
        }
        // other characters here...
    }
}​
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1  
How do you know how many columns wide he is? Are all the sprites a fixed width? Also, what's up with the single leading space? –  Dagg Nabbit May 9 '12 at 2:23
    
I use the leading space to "omit" the 0 element. This is entirely one dimension so no width, but I use the + and new lines for organizational purposes. –  user1322905 May 9 '12 at 2:26
2  
It's meant to be displayed as a two dimensional sprite, though, right? Does the display routine break lines every 10 characters, or what? Also you should probably tag your question with either .NET or Java, I just realized I have no idea what language this is. –  Dagg Nabbit May 9 '12 at 2:29
    
This is java, also it doesn't break anything, it only tells that the next line is part of the array –  user1322905 May 9 '12 at 2:31
1  
What I'm saying is your game displays this more or less like it is displayed in the code, right? If so, how does it know where each row begins? –  Dagg Nabbit May 9 '12 at 2:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd suggest having an alternate display routine to draw sprites backwards instead of storing a reversed copy of the sprite.

Try changing this line:

int x = (i - 1) % 10;

to this:

int x = 10 - (i - 1) % 10;

This should draw sprites backwards.


Also, you may want to take a look at the XPM format, it is pretty similar to what you are doing.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice and simple, must admit it's much more elegant than my answer... –  Eran Medan May 9 '12 at 3:22
    
@EranMedan I had to keep it simple, my Java knowledge is pretty much zero ;) –  Dagg Nabbit May 9 '12 at 3:27
    
@GGG, you sir, thank you from the bottom of my java library. My mind is tired right now and therefore rendered useless. Would you care to explain the "10 -" to my feeble mind? –  user1322905 May 9 '12 at 3:32
    
@user1322905 for (var i = 1; i < 21; ++i) console.log((i - 1) % 10, 10 - (i - 1) % 10) <-- type that in your browser's console and see if the output clears things up... the best way I know how to put it is x is "reversed." –  Dagg Nabbit May 9 '12 at 3:43

You should consider handling your sprites in another way. For example, since you seem to be fond of char [], you could use a char [] []. If your sprites always have the same width, you can consider something like that:

//Slices your WARRIOR into pieces
final StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
short i = 0;
for (final char a:WARRIOR) {
    if (++i != 10) {    //You should be able to find it
        builder.append(a);
    } else {
        i = 0;
        builder.append('\n');   //Line sep
    }
}

//Print the right oriented WARRIOR
System.out.println(builder);

//And flip it ! yay !
final String [] slicedWarrior = builder.toString().split("\n");   //Line sep
for (final String slice : slicedWarrior) {
    final char [] slicesOfSlice;
    for (int j = (slicesOfSlice = slice.toCharArray()).length - 1; j != 0; j--) {
        System.out.print(slicesOfSlice[j]);
    }
    System.out.print('\n');   //Line sep
}
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With the OP update, this answer is not really relevant anymore even though it works... like a bulldozer. –  Jerome May 9 '12 at 3:30

Without changing the data structure, here is a solution (I'm sure it can be improved but it works):

Short version

char[] flip = new char[warrior.length];

for(int i=0;i<warrior.length;i++){
    flip[9-i%10+ i/10*10] = warrior[i];   
}

Long version

    char[] warrior= (         
             "!!!!!     " +        
             "!!oo! ^   " +
             "!!!!! ^   " +
             "##### ^   " +
             "#######   " +
             "#####     " +
             "** **     ").toCharArray();

    for(int i=0;i<warrior.length;i++){
        if(i%10==0){
            System.out.println();
        }
        System.out.print(warrior[i]);
    }

    char[] flip = new char[warrior.length];

    for(int i=0;i<warrior.length;i++){
        //9-: 0 goes to 9, 1 to 8 etc 
        //i: cycles from 0 to 9
        //i/10: provides the row (e.g. 25/10=2)
        //*10: gives me the 2d row in 1d array  

        flip[9-i%10+ i/10*10] = warrior[i]; 
    }


    for(int i=0;i<flip.length;i++){
        if(i%10==0){
            System.out.println();
        }
        System.out.print(flip[i]);
    }

this will output

!!!!!     
!!oo! ^   
!!!!! ^   
##### ^   
#######   
#####     
** **     
     !!!!!
   ^ !oo!!
   ^ !!!!!
   ^ #####
   #######
     #####
     ** **

But i would use a different data structure (e.g. 2D array) Or think of it as a matrix, and use the example in this article

share|improve this answer
1  
The OP wants to flip it on the X axis, but your solution would flip on the Y axis (since presumably each row would be horizontal). –  Kirk Woll May 9 '12 at 2:38
    
I'm sorry, I'm not familiar with this, would you care to explain this method along with its variables/parameters? –  user1322905 May 9 '12 at 2:39
    
thanks, updated the answer. was a not trivial as I thought ;) –  Eran Medan May 9 '12 at 3:16
    
also I wrote this before knowing the display routine is X/Y based and not console output... –  Eran Medan May 9 '12 at 3:20

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