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This is something I have been doing recently and was wondering if others do it too and if so what is the name for this type of practice.

I keep shortcut columns in my tables so I can avoid doing too many joins. For example if I have a users table and a geo table:

Users:

id | username | zip       | copy_latitude | copy_longitude | other info
------------------------------------------------------------------------
1  | Bob      | 11345     | 40.81518000   | -73.04550000   | etc...

Geo:

id | zip_code | latitude    | longitude
----------------------------------------
1  | 11345    | 40.81518000 | -73.04550000

Now if I wanted to get Bob's latitude and longitude I can do so in the same select statement that I would use to get bob's other info:

SELECT a_bunch_of_other_columns, copy_latitude, copy_longitude 
FROM users WHERE id = 1;

vs (if I didn't keep the shortcuts):

SELECT a_bunch_of_other_columns, latitude, longitude 
FROM users
INNER JOIN geo ON user.zip = geo.zip_code
WHERE users.id = 1;

By keeping the shortcuts I saved myself a join. Now this may not seem like a big deal for this example table and statement but I have some huge tables and statements with 6 or 7 joins and I feel like this helps.

The only overhead is having to update both places anytime something changes. I take care of that via stored procedures.

My questions are:

  • is this a common practice among developers and if so what is it called?
  • is my database still normalized if I do this? (I would assume so since I am always keeping a valid copy of the data in the proper location even if I don't use it from there, for the sake of data integrity)
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is not normalised anymore as you have duplicated data in your tables.

I guess you could call it "Denormalised".

The only time your would really do it is for speed/optimisation purposes, which is what you are saying in your question, that you have done it to remove complexity.

Honestly I have never got to the point in any of my databases where I have needed to do this to optimise query speed.

I would suggest doing a benchmark to see just how much faster it is then a well indexed join

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Benchmarks are an excellent idea. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' May 9 '12 at 13:23

I don't know if that is common or not, but I feel confident that it is not good practice. Anytime you store data in more than one location it is less than optimal. Certainly de-normalized databases are used to increase performance at times for example a reporting database or data warehouse. In those cases the database is usually a read only denormalized copy of the transactional database.

If you really needed to reduce your joins couldn't you just create views that would satisfy those situations?

All of this duplicate data your are creating for what you think is increasing your query performance is of course decreasing your insert/update performance. How do you keep track of all of this extra data, what happens if it becomes out of sync? What happens when you leave and someone else has to discover all the extra places that data needs to be updated?

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A view built with joins doesn't reduce joins. In the OP's case--but not in the general case--the duplicate data can't get out of sync if the tables are built correctly. (See my answer, for example.) –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' May 9 '12 at 13:22
    
@Catcall my suspicion is the de-normalization is motivated by the lack of desire to write the queries not really performance. –  Gratzy May 9 '12 at 13:27

is this a common practice among developers and if so what is it called?

I can only speak for myself - I do not do this

is this a common practice among developers and if so what is it called? is my database still normalized if I do this? (I would assume so since I am always keeping a valid copy of the data in the proper location even if I don't use it from there, for the sake of data integrity)

No

BTW - You have another overhead - storage

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Let's look at it this way for a minute. You already know some of this. (PostgreSQL syntax; the dbms doesn't matter for normalization, only for implementation.)

create table geo (
  zip_code char(5) not null,
  -- CHECK constraints on lat and long omitted.
  latitude float not null,
  longitude float not null,
  primary key (zip_code),
  unique (latitude, longitude)
);

create table users (
  user_id integer not null,
  username varchar(10) not null,
  zip_code char(5) not null, 
  primary key (user_id),
  foreign key (zip_code) references geo (zip_code) 
    on update cascade on delete restrict
);

It's clear that both these tables are in 5NF.

You can create an id number for the geo table, and you can replace users.zip_code with that id number. But replacing real data with surrogate id numbers has nothing to do with normalization, and it doesn't change these tables' normal form.

Replacing real data with an id number does change performance; every time you need the user's ZIP code, you'll need to do a join to get it. It's not a completely predictable change; actual performance varies with the dbms, the server, the width of your keys, and so on. You shouldn't have trouble testing your own tables. You'll probably find that, up to several million rows, the natural key performs better than the surrogate id number. (That's what I found when I tested designs for our production database here.)

Now let's change the structure a little bit.

create table geo (
  zip_code char(5) not null,
  -- CHECK constraints on lat and long omitted.
  latitude float not null,
  longitude float not null,
  primary key (zip_code),
  unique (latitude, longitude),
  -- Allows all three columns to be the target for a foreign key.
  unique (zip_code, latitude, longitude)
);

create table users (
  user_id integer not null,
  username varchar(10) not null,
  zip_code char(5) not null, 
  latitude float not null,
  longitude float not null,
  primary key (user_id),
  -- This FK has to reference all three columns. If split, it's possible
  -- to reference the latitude and longitude for the wrong zip code.
  foreign key (zip_code, latitude, longitude) 
    references geo (zip_code, latitude, longitude) 
    on update cascade on delete restrict
);

Although this change does introduce a transitive dependency, in that user_id -> zip_code, and zip_code -> latitude, etc, it doesn't cause any insert, update, or delete anomalies. That's because all the values involved in the transitive dependencies are covered by a single foreign key reference to a 5NF table.

The table geo is still in 5NF; users is now in 2NF. What have we gained or lost here?

  • We lose disk space to storage for the wider foreign key data and indexes.
  • Up to some number of rows (probably several million), we get faster performance on SELECT queries. (I didn't test your schema, because I don't have time. But I've measured speed increases of 20 to 30 times by using natural keys. Your differences will probably be much less dramatic.)
  • We get slower performance on INSERT statements, and on most UPDATE statements. (Slower doesn't mean slow. 5msec is slower than 3msec, but 5msec isn't necessarily slow. Most of my own inserts and updates run in fractions of a millisecond.)

So build a test schema, populate it with a few million rows, and measure performance. Test the performance with

  • a foreign key on zip_code, and a join to get the latitude and longitude, then
  • restructure and test with a foreign key on {zip_code, latitude, longitude}, then
  • restructure and test with a surrogate id number and a join to get zip_code, latitude, and longitude.

And post the results here. I'd love to see them.

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